03-09-11 01:10 AM
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  1. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Do you mind clarifying it for me? Either here or in PM. Thanx!
    Depending on the size of the message or attachments, you might not see anything at all. I just sent myself an email with an 8.5 MB .pdf attachment. Here is what I see.


    When I open it in the browser, I am able to view the attachment. However, I would not even know there was an attachment without opening the email in the browser. I've been using BlackBerry long enough to know that when nothing at all appears in an email due to truncation, it is due to large attachments. Otherwise, I will see "Truncated <number of bytes received>" at the bottom of the message.
    Last edited by lak611; 02-24-11 at 12:41 PM.
    aab81901 likes this.
    02-24-11 12:25 PM
  2. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    And to add to that again lak611, if you do get an email that is partially available and truncated after at least some viewable data on the BB, when you upgrade your OS and restore your backup, the email is completely blank (nothing in it, not a single word or anything). Truly annoying if you're trying to keep emails on your BB for historical reasons (having the info readily avalable on you). That sucks even more.

    Even worse, it doesn't look like RIM wants to address this issue as 6.0 still has it (because of the NOC data transfer limitations) and I can't say with any certainty if they'll address this issue in 6.1 either. I honestly believe that because they have to relay all this data themselves to each of the millions of BBs they have out there, that they simply cannot process all the data as efficiently as a true smartphone can (one that doesn't depend upon anything but a network gateway to the cloud to transfer data). This is the kind of limitations BB will always have to deal with in one way or another. They've built the platform to require their NOC to sift through all your transfered data and that's costing them in today's world. This might have been needed when we were limited on wireless speed and sizes vs time, but with today's faster wired and wireless networks, worrying about data transfer rates and trying to cut people's data by these sort of means is just a slap in the face from RIM. Basically, they'll telling me that my email isn't important enough to be able to read it all.
    aab81901 likes this.
    02-24-11 02:56 PM
  3. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    And to add to that again lak611, if you do get an email that is partially available and truncated after at least some viewable data on the BB, when you upgrade your OS and restore your backup, the email is completely blank (nothing in it, not a single word or anything). Truly annoying if you're trying to keep emails on your BB for historical reasons (having the info readily avalable on you). That sucks even more.
    It is not the most convenient option, but I save the email (non-truncated) in Outlook. I also copy the text of the email from Outlook and paste it and save it as a Word .doc or .docx, and then transfer that file to my microSD card in the Documents folder. Word to Go opens it, and OS upgrades are not an issue.

    Folks who do not have Outlook could copy the text of the email when viewing it in the PC's browser, and then paste it into a Word .doc or .docx which they save, and then transfer that file to their microSD card in the Documents folder.

    It is a PITA, but it works.
    02-24-11 10:34 PM
  4. howarmat's Avatar
    It is not the most convenient option, but I save the email (non-truncated) in Outlook. I also copy the text of the email from Outlook and paste it and save it as a Word .doc or .docx, and then transfer that file to my microSD card in the Documents folder. Word to Go opens it, and OS upgrades are not an issue.

    Folks who do not have Outlook could copy the text of the email when viewing it in the PC's browser, and then paste it into a Word .doc or .docx which they save, and then transfer that file to their microSD card in the Documents folder.

    It is a PITA, but it works.
    that does sound like a huge PITA...in 2011 smartphone world its absurd to have go through all of that just to be able to read an email and not worrying about it being "lost"
    02-24-11 10:46 PM
  5. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    that does sound like a huge PITA...in 2011 smartphone world its absurd to have go through all of that just to be able to read an email and not worrying about it being "lost"
    Truth be told, it is not something I do often. I use Outlook, so any important emails are saved on my PC. Since I am not a business user, there is no real need for me to save emails on a smartphone. Once I read them and reply if necessary, they get deleted from handheld. There are only a couple that I've had any need to save on the device.
    02-25-11 12:13 AM
  6. howarmat's Avatar
    see im the other way, used to use outlook for email all the time. now most all email i do is from my phone on the go
    02-25-11 12:17 AM
  7. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    It is not the most convenient option, but I save the email (non-truncated) in Outlook. I also copy the text of the email from Outlook and paste it and save it as a Word .doc or .docx, and then transfer that file to my microSD card in the Documents folder. Word to Go opens it, and OS upgrades are not an issue.

    Folks who do not have Outlook could copy the text of the email when viewing it in the PC's browser, and then paste it into a Word .doc or .docx which they save, and then transfer that file to their microSD card in the Documents folder.

    It is a PITA, but it works.
    Lol, give me some credit. I never said the email doesn't still exist in my mailbox on the server. That's not the issue. The issue is that I don't easily have access to it via the phone. My mentality is this; My mobile email solution needs to be a mirror image to my mailbox on the server. If it cannot do this out of the box natively without bs extra crap (i.e BES) it sucks. Some might not agree with this, but there are those that do.
    02-25-11 12:20 AM
  8. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Lol, give me some credit. I never said the email doesn't still exist in my mailbox on the server. That's not the issue. The issue is that I don't easily have access to it via the phone. My mentality is this; My mobile email solution needs to be a mirror image to my mailbox on the server. If it cannot do this out of the box natively without bs extra crap (i.e BES) it sucks. Some might not agree with this, but there are those that do.
    I actually agree. It is a PITA to check email using the browser.
    02-25-11 12:23 AM
  9. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    see im the other way, used to use outlook for email all the time. now most all email i do is from my phone on the go
    I do have my laptop with me most of the time. When I am sending long emails, I prefer having a 15" screen and full size keyboard.
    02-25-11 12:26 AM
  10. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    see im the other way, used to use outlook for email all the time. now most all email i do is from my phone on the go
    I can't help but think this is why I have such a negatively critical view of RIM's email solution. I think BB people view their platform as a "helper" to mobilize their email when needed. I don't think like that. The only real time I ever use a full email client is when I'm putting together a quote or something for someone that requires attaching files that I either haven't created on the mobile device or that I don't want on it.

    After all, if my mobile's mailbox can be identical to the server's mailbox, WTF else will I see by using the full client as opposed to my phone? With the additional capabilities of the iPhone's email client with perfect HTML rendering and no truncation, I'm set. I even file my emails as needed directly from the phone. It's truly and finally painless now.

    There are those that will argue that BES should have done this for me without issue. Here's my answer to that; Ya, only on a single BES activation. I need that same mailbox navigation on multiple Exchange server accounts. BES can't do that, ActiveSync on the iPhone can. Most people don't understand this small detail for some reason.
    02-25-11 12:32 AM
  11. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I can't help but think this is why I have such a negatively critical view of RIM's email solution. I think BB people view their platform as a "helper" to mobilize their email when needed. I don't think like that. The only real time I ever use a full email client is when I'm putting together a quote or something for someone that requires attaching files that I either haven't created on the mobile device or that I don't want on it.

    After all, if my mobile's mailbox can be identical to the server's mailbox, WTF else will I see by using the full client as opposed to my phone? With the additional capabilities of the iPhone's email client with perfect HTML rendering and no truncation, I'm set. I even file my emails as needed directly from the phone. It's truly and finally painless now.
    If you compose your emails in a manner like your forum posts on your mobile devices, then I would expect to see quality. I also try to compose emails using proper grammar and punctuation, whether using a mail client or my mobile device.

    However, many of the emails I receive from BlackBerry, iPhone, or Android users (with the telltale "sent from my <device>") look like they were written by someone who is not fluent in English.

    Users who cannot master spelling and punctuation on mobile devices should use full mail clients.
    02-25-11 12:41 AM
  12. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    If you compose your emails in a manner like your forum posts on your mobile devices, then I would expect to see quality. I also try to compose emails using proper grammar and punctuation, whether using a mail client or my mobile device.

    However, many of the emails I receive from BlackBerry, iPhone, or Android users (with the telltale "sent from my <device>") look like they were written by someone who is not fluent in English.

    Users who cannot master spelling and punctuation on mobile devices should use full mail clients.
    Ya, I don't have that problem. I use proper everything even on my texts and it bothers me when people reply back with stupid spelling or short lingo for some things because now they've f up my SMS thread. Lol
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    02-25-11 01:07 AM
  13. Jake Storm's Avatar
    No, you're not incorrect about that...
    Is that like a triple negative
    Civic you should go into politics
    02-25-11 01:29 AM
  14. sivan's Avatar
    I can't help but think this is why I have such a negatively critical view of RIM's email solution. I think BB people view their platform as a "helper" to mobilize their email when needed. I don't think like that. The only real time I ever use a full email client is when I'm putting together a quote or something for someone that requires attaching files that I either haven't created on the mobile device or that I don't want on it.
    Yes, and you can still see it with the BlackBerry tethering to the PlayBook, a companion device. After all, the BlackBerry started as a pager. It's a lot harder to grow it into a full OS than it is to cram a desktop OS into a phone, like Apple did with OS X to iOS. Apple basically just waited for the right hardware to come along.

    Still, on balance, the iPhone has been a great mobile computer but a really bad phone and it wasn't just AT&T. The iPhone came on the network without any consideration for bandwidth and congestion, Steve Jobs said it was the full web experience, which looked great in demos, but didn't work very well in real world use.

    Now about the truncation, I think it affects few people, but RIM isn't disclosing it prominently. I'm actually puzzled by the hard limit, but I'm not affected by it. Most of the email I get a plain text or marketing material I'm not interested in opening. Like others, I also now use email and calendar almost exclusively on my phone so synchronization with my desktop is not as important as I once thought.
    02-25-11 01:47 AM
  15. Laura Knotek's Avatar

    Still, on balance, the iPhone has been a great mobile computer but a really bad phone and it wasn't just AT&T. The iPhone came on the network without any consideration for bandwidth and congestion, Steve Jobs said it was the full web experience, which looked great in demos, but didn't work very well in real world use.
    I actually use the "phone" the least out of all of the functions on my BlackBerry, so the "bad phone" would not be an issue for me if I were an iPhone user.

    If I had the option of data-only with pay-per-use voice, I would take it.
    howarmat likes this.
    02-25-11 01:53 AM
  16. sivan's Avatar
    I actually use the "phone" the least out of all of the functions on my BlackBerry, so the "bad phone" would not be an issue for me if I were an iPhone user.

    If I had the option of data-only with pay-per-use voice, I would take it.
    I don't use the phone much myself nowadays. But, I was on AT&T briefly, and just the few calls I had to make and were dropped, absolutely drove me bonkers. I couldn't take it and left for T-Mobile. There's something really aggravating about dropped calls, I think it's the inherent effort in initiating and holding a discussion that we don't want to lose.

    I also heard from iPhone users that lots of text messages and voice mails were often delayed or lost.
    02-25-11 02:00 AM
  17. MrObvious's Avatar
    I honestly find it annoying as well but I just check my email on my web browser. I just made a shortcut on my app list for my Gmail and my business email which runs through Gmail servers.
    02-25-11 05:10 AM
  18. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Is that like a triple negative
    Civic you should go into politics
    That would depend on what your definition of "IS", is...

    Yes, and you can still see it with the BlackBerry tethering to the PlayBook, a companion device. After all, the BlackBerry started as a pager. It's a lot harder to grow it into a full OS than it is to cram a desktop OS into a phone, like Apple did with OS X to iOS. Apple basically just waited for the right hardware to come along.

    Still, on balance, the iPhone has been a great mobile computer but a really bad phone and it wasn't just AT&T. The iPhone came on the network without any consideration for bandwidth and congestion, Steve Jobs said it was the full web experience, which looked great in demos, but didn't work very well in real world use.

    Now about the truncation, I think it affects few people, but RIM isn't disclosing it prominently. I'm actually puzzled by the hard limit, but I'm not affected by it. Most of the email I get a plain text or marketing material I'm not interested in opening. Like others, I also now use email and calendar almost exclusively on my phone so synchronization with my desktop is not as important as I once thought.
    What are you talking about here? I don't think I ever brought up the PB in any way. Also, because the PB doesn't natively support email, the truncation issue that's still prevelent on BB, will happen on the PB because the PB won't display anything that BB already doesn't have in the inbox. So, even with the PB, my issues with email wouldn't have been resolved. Don't let RIM and everyone else fool you, the PB is RIM's "hold-over" device for people that want a more media rich experience. They've thrown everything they have for web browsing and multitasking into the device to distract users from the weaknesses of a BB. RIM's answer is 50 freaking companion devices instead of just one damn good device that can do all the crap you need it to do. I don't work like that and everyone jumping ship doesn't either. It's old school mentality to carry around a pocket protector full of options. Screw that. Give me one device that can do all the stuff I need and I'm good to go. The iPhone handles about 90% of that for me and the other 10% is unlockable via a Jailbreak. So, the choice is mine as to if I want to unlock those other functions or not. I don't view Jailbreaking something as a weakness in terms of lack of functionality. I view it as a restriction set in place by the manufacturer. To me, it's no different than a speed governor or decreased HP/TQ limits via a tune from the factory for a car. Both of these issues are solvable for me via aftermarket ECU flashes. I don't view that as a weakness, I view it as a restriction put in place for the general crowd. I don't belong to that same circle, so I have the knowledge and tools to play outside of the circle and be happy. With BB or PB, the restrictions remain in place no matter what, because RIM controls the backend of the platform. It's big brother like and I don't like that at all.

    And last but no least, I honestly don't have any issues making ANY calls on my iPhone. I have a gut feeling that whatever issues there might have been with that which weren't always limited to AT&T's ishtty network probably had to do with the crap Infenion chipset they had in that device. The Qualcomm chipped ViPhone is rock solid... and because Qualcomm is the LTE chipset manufacturer from now on, you can bet your bank account that the next iPhone will be Qualcomm chipped as well for all carriers, since their chipsets can support multibands without issues and with easy lockouts if Apple wants to play that game.... which they already are with the ViPhone (GSM is disabled, but could have been a world phone easily).
    02-25-11 10:23 AM
  19. i7guy's Avatar
    That would depend on what your definition of "IS", is...



    What are you talking about here? I don't think I ever brought up the PB in any way. Also, because the PB doesn't natively support email, the truncation issue that's still prevelent on BB, will happen on the PB because the PB won't display anything that BB already doesn't have in the inbox. So, even with the PB, my issues with email wouldn't have been resolved. Don't let RIM and everyone else fool you, the PB is RIM's "hold-over" device for people that want a more media rich experience. They've thrown everything they have for web browsing and multitasking into the device to distract users from the weaknesses of a BB. RIM's answer is 50 freaking companion devices instead of just one damn good device that can do all the crap you need it to do. I don't work like that and everyone jumping ship doesn't either. It's old school mentality to carry around a pocket protector full of options. Screw that. Give me one device that can do all the stuff I need and I'm good to go. The iPhone handles about 90% of that for me and the other 10% is unlockable via a Jailbreak. So, the choice is mine as to if I want to unlock those other functions or not. I don't view Jailbreaking something as a weakness in terms of lack of functionality. I view it as a restriction set in place by the manufacturer. To me, it's no different than a speed governor or decreased HP/TQ limits via a tune from the factory for a car. Both of these issues are solvable for me via aftermarket ECU flashes. I don't view that as a weakness, I view it as a restriction put in place for the general crowd. I don't belong to that same circle, so I have the knowledge and tools to play outside of the circle and be happy. With BB or PB, the restrictions remain in place no matter what, because RIM controls the backend of the platform. It's big brother like and I don't like that at all.

    And last but no least, I honestly don't have any issues making ANY calls on my iPhone. I have a gut feeling that whatever issues there might have been with that which weren't always limited to AT&T's ishtty network probably had to do with the crap Infenion chipset they had in that device. The Qualcomm chipped ViPhone is rock solid... and because Qualcomm is the LTE chipset manufacturer from now on, you can bet your bank account that the next iPhone will be Qualcomm chipped as well for all carriers, since their chipsets can support multibands without issues and with easy lockouts if Apple wants to play that game.... which they already are with the ViPhone (GSM is disabled, but could have been a world phone easily).
    Baloney. itouch, ipod, iphone, ipad no integration between these devices. I'm happy the Playbook will have some integration with my Blackberry and it will let me do things in a rich multimedia environment that all small screen phones are unable to do to MY COMPLETE SATISFACTION.

    And yes, I'm not happy with qualify of the phone calls on the two Viphones in the family, but it is what it is.

    I need a solution to handle 100% of my requirements, which is why I have my laptop with me during business hours, can't play games with a small screen at times.

    That said, I do wish RIM would improve the browser just a wee tad.
    02-25-11 01:53 PM
  20. aab81901's Avatar
    I actually use the "phone" the least out of all of the functions on my BlackBerry, so the "bad phone" would not be an issue for me if I were an iPhone user.

    If I had the option of data-only with pay-per-use voice, I would take it.
    Now that you mentioned it, it's funny to realize that my plan includes unlimited data and text and limited minutes.
    02-26-11 12:54 PM
  21. aab81901's Avatar
    Since I am not a business user, there is no real need for me to save emails on a smartphone. Once I read them and reply if necessary, they get deleted from handheld. There are only a couple that I've had any need to save on the device.
    I'm not a business user either, but I don't delete the emails for convenience. Some emails include info I will need later when I'm on the go. So really my mobile inbox constantly has a few emails saved. But like I said, it's more for reference than anything else.
    02-26-11 01:01 PM
  22. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Baloney. itouch, ipod, iphone, ipad no integration between these devices. I'm happy the Playbook will have some integration with my Blackberry and it will let me do things in a rich multimedia environment that all small screen phones are unable to do to MY COMPLETE SATISFACTION.

    And yes, I'm not happy with qualify of the phone calls on the two Viphones in the family, but it is what it is.

    I need a solution to handle 100% of my requirements, which is why I have my laptop with me during business hours, can't play games with a small screen at times.

    That said, I do wish RIM would improve the browser just a wee tad.
    WTF are you talking about? If all these devices are integrated to the same ActiveSync enabled email account, the info on all devices ARE IDENTICAL AND TO THE SECOND. You make one change on one device and as long as the other device is connected to the Internet (which inturn gives it access to the accounts in question), the info is sync'd immediately with no user interaction. And if for some reason the device isn't liked to the web at the time the change happens, the next time it does, the changes are immediately pushed to the device and it matches all the others. I know this is the case because I have a ton of clients who have iPads and iPhones integrated to the same MS Exchange accounts for work and both of their iDevices are in constant sync, not only for email (including all mailbox subfolders) but also for their Contacts and Calendar entries.

    I think you need to experience the seamlessness of ActiveSync integration to an Exchange server from these devices before you share your viewpoint on something you've not seen first hand.
    02-26-11 06:49 PM
  23. i7guy's Avatar
    WTF are you talking about? If all these devices are integrated to the same ActiveSync enabled email account, the info on all devices ARE IDENTICAL AND TO THE SECOND. You make one change on one device and as long as the other device is connected to the Internet (which inturn gives it access to the accounts in question), the info is sync'd immediately with no user interaction. And if for some reason the device isn't liked to the web at the time the change happens, the next time it does, the changes are immediately pushed to the device and it matches all the others. I know this is the case because I have a ton of clients who have iPads and iPhones integrated to the same MS Exchange accounts for work and both of their iDevices are in constant sync, not only for email (including all mailbox subfolders) but also for their Contacts and Calendar entries.

    I think you need to experience the seamlessness of ActiveSync integration to an Exchange server from these devices before you share your viewpoint on something you've not seen first hand.
    That's my point they need the internet. In concept I like the playbook approach better. It interfaces to your BB.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-26-11 11:25 PM
  24. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    That's my point they need the internet. In concept I like the playbook approach better. It interfaces to your BB.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Now you've gone off the deep end. How is that better? You cannot do email on it without a BB. You could do web email, but that requires web access too.

    And I don't understand, why is it so bad to get web access on these other devices? You can use WIFI or pay for a data plan. No one is forcing you to do both. So, again, how is the lame Bluetooth email the PB does any better than these other devices? All it is is just basic remote viewing of the same limited email capabilities your BB is locked down to. (i.e. Poor HTML rendering and 32k limit before truncation.) That's awesome!
    02-27-11 12:24 AM
  25. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    That's my point they need the internet. In concept I like the playbook approach better. It interfaces to your BB.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    How does the Playbook/BlackBerry combination access email without an Internet connection?
    02-27-11 12:26 AM
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