03-09-11 12:10 AM
125 123 ...
tools
  1. sleepngbear's Avatar
    Hampus Jakobsson, former head of TAT, current director of strategic alliances at RIM has some very interesting thoughts on where mobile devices should be going. One line in the article that particularly caught my attention is, "Jakobbson also said earlier that he was 'extremely impressed' after two months at the company with RIM's focus on efficiency, security and quality in its corporate operations and devices."

    My take, these are the very things we BB 'fans' insist are what make our BB's preferable to us over the spec- and feature-dominant devices from other manufacturers. This is not to suggest that any one is better than another, nor is it to suggest that RIM doesn't need to step up its game in the spec department. Rather, it illustrates pretty clearly that these qualities are a big part of what makes BB's in general more desirable, at least to some of us, and that this focus is no accident.

    Smartphones driving you nuts? Industry execs take note.

    If nothing else, I think the points in this article give us a good idea of the challenges these manufacturers face when designing devices and making those all-critical decisions of what to put in and what to leave out when positioning themselves not just for today, but for where the industry as a whole will be going in the future.

    I just have to admire guys who think like this, because as smart as I like to think I am, I ain't one of 'em.
    02-17-11 05:45 PM
  2. Rickroller's Avatar
    Jakobbson also said earlier that he was 'extremely impressed' after two months at the company with RIM's focus on efficiency, security and quality in its corporate operations and devices."

    My take, these are the very things we BB 'fans' insist are what make our BB's preferable to us over the spec- and feature-dominant devices from other manufacturers.
    Sooo..BB "fans" prefer them because of how the company carry's itself? Because RIM is effecient and they run a quality organization is NOT why I would say most people buy RIM products (or don't buy)..nor do I think those are reason's to buy ANY phone companies products. People buy what they buy because it does the job THEY want it to..be it gaming, texting, emails, or browsing.
    02-17-11 07:00 PM
  3. K Bear's Avatar
    So Jakobbson believes that people should demand less from their devices because society is becoming more dependent on technology for communication. This from a person who works for a company that pimps out BBM. I'm sorry, but that is not a justification for providing users with less options.

    Seriously, people need to vote with their pocketbooks with where they want technology to go and what they want their device to do.
    02-17-11 07:53 PM
  4. i7guy's Avatar
    So Jakobbson believes that people should demand less from their devices because society is becoming more dependent on technology for communication. This from a person who works for a company that pimps out BBM. I'm sorry, but that is not a justification for providing users with less options.

    Seriously, people need to vote with their pocketbooks with where they want technology to go and what they want their device to do.
    You are right I voted. There is something to providing a device you don't have to fight with. RIM does need to step up its game, which allegedly it has.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-17-11 10:05 PM
  5. grncherry1's Avatar
    Hampus Jakobsson, former head of TAT, current director of strategic alliances at RIM has some very interesting thoughts on where mobile devices should be going. One line in the article that particularly caught my attention is, "Jakobbson also said earlier that he was 'extremely impressed' after two months at the company with RIM's focus on efficiency, security and quality in its corporate operations and devices."

    My take, these are the very things we BB 'fans' insist are what make our BB's preferable to us over the spec- and feature-dominant devices from other manufacturers. This is not to suggest that any one is better than another, nor is it to suggest that RIM doesn't need to step up its game in the spec department. Rather, it illustrates pretty clearly that these qualities are a big part of what makes BB's in general more desirable, at least to some of us, and that this focus is no accident.

    Smartphones driving you nuts? Industry execs take note.

    If nothing else, I think the points in this article give us a good idea of the challenges these manufacturers face when designing devices and making those all-critical decisions of what to put in and what to leave out when positioning themselves not just for today, but for where the industry as a whole will be going in the future.

    I just have to admire guys who think like this, because as smart as I like to think I am, I ain't one of 'em.
    Sounds like some pep rally in a corporate lunch room. Cheer up the troops and get out there and continue with the excellent jobs you all have been doing. Give me a break, he just got the job and wants to keep it for a while.
    02-17-11 10:24 PM
  6. sleepngbear's Avatar
    '... impressed ... with RIM's focus on efficiency, security and quality in its corporate operations and devices.'
    Did anybody actually read the article, or do y'all just pick a phrase or two to rip on?

    Yes, to a very large degree, corporate culture is reflected in a company's products and services. Just look at MS and Windows. My point is, there are those of us who don't want our phones to be an all-in-one/do-everything device. My opinion, you get one device that tries to do everything, it's quite likely that it won't do any of them well. So take a few things that it can do well, focus on those and making them work smoothly and efficiently. Jakobsson's comments seem to suggest that's been RIM's strategy all along. Not everybody needs to carry around a home theater system in their pocket.

    I guess I should have known better than to seek some intelligent, positive discussion here.
    tgellr likes this.
    02-18-11 06:35 AM
  7. i7guy's Avatar
    ^^^this. Intelligent post, thank you. Efficient company begets efficient device. Mor so than droid or apple. Neither of which imo are efficient yet there is more of a fun factor in droid and apple. That said I'd rather play with my wife than my phone.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-18-11 06:43 AM
  8. dkingsf's Avatar
    ^^^this. Intelligent post, thank you. Efficient company begets efficient device. Mor so than droid or apple. Neither of which imo are efficient yet there is more of a fun factor in droid and apple. That said I'd rather play with my wife than my phone.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I'd rather play with your wife than my phone too!
    02-18-11 07:09 AM
  9. Rickroller's Avatar
    Did anybody actually read the article, or do y'all just pick a phrase or two to rip on? My opinion, you get one device that tries to do everything, it's quite likely that it won't do any of them well. So take a few things that it can do well, focus on those and making them work smoothly and efficiently. Jakobsson's comments seem to suggest that's been RIM's strategy all along. Not everybody needs to carry around a home theater system in their pocket.

    I guess I should have known better than to seek some intelligent, positive discussion here.
    Did you actually read the article? I've read it three times..and the whole tone of the article is about how society as a whole is getting drawn into their phones, and whether that is good or bad.

    "several industry executives publicly dared to call for fewer devices per person -- not more -- that won't interrupt us as much."

    "We're not talking to each other, but talking to devices. That's something we have to think about ... Do we want a future where people stare at screens or a future where people talk to each other?"


    NOWHERE did I get out of the article that Jakobsson's comments suggest RIM has been trying to accomplish this all along

    In answering a question from the audience about what RIM was planning to do about device interruptions, Jakobsson suggested that RIM might want to prevent games from running on its BlackBerry smartphones to cut back on the crush of inputs users receive that keep them from interacting with one another.

    "Maybe BlackBerry shouldn't have games," he said. "Maybe there should be no games at all on BlackBerry. Actually, I'm not sure my [new] company is brave enough to do that." (Jakobbson also said earlier that he was "extremely impressed" after two months at the company with RIM's focus on efficiency, security and quality in its corporate operations and devices.)
    I know you enjoy your Blackberry..but how you inferred out of this article that RIM has been trying all along not to try to do everything and only focus on a few things is beyond me..

    If anything..what I got from the article is that developers are trying to cut down on the number of extra things people carry on them..and have one or two devices that do it all..

    "Donovan predicted that mobile devices will continue to proliferate in the next few years, but said they should "disintegrate" down to fewer devices per person.

    Donovan said he's been known to carry several devices to work, including a laptop, cell phone and e-reader but he wants fewer.

    Jan Uddenfeldt, CTO for Sony Ericsson, argued in favor of reducing the number of personal devices that users carry in coming years to one
    As far as "intelligent" discussions go..when you try to spin an article into something that it's not..then expect some negative feedback.
    02-18-11 08:03 AM
  10. Sirhill's Avatar
    I understood this article in a slightly different way. I got out of the article that the devices that we currently have and those to come out are more about consumption and less about what they are meant to be and thats communication devices. Jakobsson is saying that these device were meant to complement our daily lives but they have become more of an interference because of the way interact with social media (like twitter). Instead of buying a device that gives us the best way to communicate we would weather have a device that gives us the best gaming and social media options. The major point was that there is no one device that does this so more devices are made in which we (the consumer) buy into and continue to add to our ever growing collection. This is also highlighted when the AT&T guy say please keep playing and downloading games. They more we act on our need to have the best the more these companies make and the more device will be made.

    As far as the whole RIM issue he is just saying that he is impressed that how they focus on certain aspects to how they go about building their devices. In his short time there they have made him understand not only do they have to keep their core but that they also much keep up with the Jones's, although he may not believe that they could just stop adding games to their devices. The whole point of the article again is about consumption, more all-in-one devices that allow us to get through our day and than have time to sit with friends and family to communicate face to face not through a screen.
    sleepngbear likes this.
    02-18-11 10:22 AM
  11. sleepngbear's Avatar
    ^^^this. Intelligent post, thank you. Efficient company begets efficient device. Mor so than droid or apple. Neither of which imo are efficient yet there is more of a fun factor in droid and apple.
    That's one way of putting it ... and that's all I was trying to get to. That's not to say that Androids and iPhones are ineffecient or unproductive; just that they all have a different focus. Jakobsson's quote just got me to thinking ... the focus of RIM that is frequently criticized by many for being too narrow and behind the times is actually the reason why a lot of us prefer its products. Narrow in focus is not necessarily a bad thing if it means that it's going to be better at doing the fewer things it does. On the other hand, if you want, need or expect a product to do more or different things, well, then you're obviously going to have a different opinion on that.

    That said I'd rather play with my wife than my phone.
    Well, I've never seen your wife, but nonetheless I think I'm really glad to know that. (and I'll bet she is too.)

    Did you actually read the article? I've read it three times..and the whole tone of the article is about how society as a whole is getting drawn into their phones, and whether that is good or bad.

    NOWHERE did I get out of the article that Jakobsson's comments suggest RIM has been trying to accomplish this all along
    Ok, I did say that one line in particular caught my interest; that was not to suggest the whole article was about RIM's strategy. I also said that it's my take on Jakobsson's comments, not that it's gospel, just my take. In general, I just thought it would be an interesting article to share.

    Other than that, the tone you said that you drew out of it has some merit as well, but that's still all just a matter of opinion. I mean, we have a whole generation of kids growing up who have no clue of how to carry on a face-to-face conversation because they spend every spare moment of their lives on facebook; and if that's not enough, now we have facebook-themed phones being introduced. That in itself is a sad commentary on where our culture is headed. So yeah, I completely agree that we've taken mobile devices from being productivity tools to being a way of life, and it's kind of refreshing to hear that perspective from somebody pretty high up in the industry that helped to create it.


    I know you enjoy your Blackberry..but how you inferred out of this article that RIM has been trying all along not to try to do everything and only focus on a few things is beyond me..

    If anything..what I got from the article is that developers are trying to cut down on the number of extra things people carry on them..and have one or two devices that do it all..

    As far as "intelligent" discussions go..when you try to spin an article into something that it's not..then expect some negative feedback.
    Again, I'm not trying to spin anything ... just my thoughts on one line in particular and how I think it reflects on RIM and its products in general. And yes, there are other points made by individuals quoted in the article that are also worthy of discussion. If you inferred something completely different from it than I did, well that's great, and that's the whole point of these discussion boards. I posted it because I was interested to hear people's thoughts on it. You got something different out of it than I did, post away saying so. But negative feedback and sarcasm are not required for stating an opposing opinion, especially when the intent was to start a friendly dialog.
    02-18-11 10:28 AM
  12. Rickroller's Avatar
    Other than that, the tone you said that you drew out of it has some merit as well, but that's still all just a matter of opinion. I mean, we have a whole generation of kids growing up who have no clue of how to carry on a face-to-face conversation because they spend every spare moment of their lives on facebook; and if that's not enough, now we have facebook-themed phones being introduced. That in itself is a sad commentary on where our culture is headed.
    Can't argue with that. It seems more people communicate via Facebook than they do in real life now..Me and a friend were joking about that yesterday. We both work long days and extended periods of time away from home..so when we do get days off..they are spent with the immediate family, thus leaving very little time for old friends and whatnot. I suggested we both needed to maybe start a Facebook profile (neither of us use FB) just so that we can keep in touch lol..

    Anyways..i'll apologize if I put words (or tone ) in your mouth..not trying to start an argument here. I definately like open discussions on this site (as few and far between as they are lol )
    02-18-11 10:52 AM
  13. hootyhoo's Avatar
    I don't have a Face Book account. But most people I know do.

    From what I've observed, I think social media is not as bad as some people would have you think. Using FB or whatever allows people to stay in contact with folks they wouldn't normally hang out with. Cb is an example. Sometimes it seems hard to just find time for our family, much less a couple dozen friends. There truely is only so much time in a day.

    As I've said, I don't use social media much (I focus on my family as much as possible), but maybe those who do are on to something. It makes it easy to stay connected to more people who are important to you. People who would otherwise receive none of your time.

    While it is a sea change to see people peering into a small electronic device all the time, I don't think that it is necessarily bad thing as long as people remember to notice those who are still in their physical space.

    I don't think of this device as a mutitasker or a distraction (even though it is sometimes both), I see it as a tool to stay connected to the people who I need and the people who need me and I want one that does it with the least amount of fuss.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-18-11 11:34 AM
  14. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Sounds like some pep rally in a corporate lunch room. Cheer up the troops and get out there and continue with the excellent jobs you all have been doing. Give me a break, he just got the job and wants to keep it for a while.
    Ding!

    Did anybody actually read the article, or do y'all just pick a phrase or two to rip on?

    Yes, to a very large degree, corporate culture is reflected in a company's products and services. Just look at MS and Windows. My point is, there are those of us who don't want our phones to be an all-in-one/do-everything device. My opinion, you get one device that tries to do everything, it's quite likely that it won't do any of them well. So take a few things that it can do well, focus on those and making them work smoothly and efficiently. Jakobsson's comments seem to suggest that's been RIM's strategy all along. Not everybody needs to carry around a home theater system in their pocket.

    I guess I should have known better than to seek some intelligent, positive discussion here.
    While I agree that some products in the past have tried to be the jack of all traits but failed badly, I think it's even worse when you pride yourself on one thing that you cannot do properly. HTML rendering and unlimited email size. Two things that RIM is short on... very short. So, can we still say that RIM's focus on doing email well has failed because of this. I think so, but I'm also well aware that the current predicament they are with email is one they engineered themselves into. As much as visionaries as Mike and Jim like to call themselves, I don't think they saw clearly enough into the future to realize that the backbone infrastructure they were building as a network for their BB devices to rely on would also be their weakness when it comes to unlimited content. They started their business and platform to solve mobilizing of large amounts of data into a compressed and limited fashion. While this was the needed thing during the years of their inception, that's no longer the case now, but it's too late in the game and not enough time to change out the underlying infrastructure to give people what they want now "today". It's like building a house on a slab and a couple of years later your family wants to renovate the basement and turn it into a media room. Well, guess what?... there is no basement. So, it's going to take time to knock it all down and rebuild for the situation or (more along what RIM's doing) living in the house while rebuilding some of it at the same time and telling everyone that it'll take 2 weeks. (The Money Pit reference) I'm sure in the end it'll be nice, but damn, couldn't they have just seen the signs coming and moved quicker? They should have started on the renovations 2 years ago instead of sleeping on it and having Mike fly all over the world telling everyone that a bandwidth doom is coming and to use BB because text based email and limited MultiMedia capabilities are all you really need in a mobile device. Gee, if Mike really believes that, why is he so gung-** to implement NFC on their devices at the same time other mobile manufacturers are doing the same thing? Maybe he is learning...
    02-18-11 11:46 AM
  15. MrObvious's Avatar
    God you guys give BB some flack some times. Frankly I got it just because it does a decent job surfing the web, and I can at least get email on it and the keyboard is one of my favorite things.
    02-18-11 12:09 PM
  16. dutchtender's Avatar
    ^^^this. Intelligent post, thank you. Efficient company begets efficient device. Mor so than droid or apple. Neither of which imo are efficient yet there is more of a fun factor in droid and apple. That said I'd rather play with my wife than my phone.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    you sayin your wife just does what you need?
    02-18-11 11:13 PM
  17. sivan's Avatar
    The devices are not the problem. The dedicated forums nullify any productivity gains.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-19-11 12:34 AM
  18. aab81901's Avatar
    While I agree that some products in the past have tried to be the jack of all traits but failed badly, I think it's even worse when you pride yourself on one thing that you cannot do properly. HTML rendering and unlimited email size. Two things that RIM is short on... very short. So, can we still say that RIM's focus on doing email well has failed because of this. I think so, but I'm also well aware that the current predicament they are with email is one they engineered themselves into. As much as visionaries as Mike and Jim like to call themselves, I don't think they saw clearly enough into the future to realize that the backbone infrastructure they were building as a network for their BB devices to rely on would also be their weakness when it comes to unlimited content. They started their business and platform to solve mobilizing of large amounts of data into a compressed and limited fashion. While this was the needed thing during the years of their inception, that's no longer the case now, but it's too late in the game and not enough time to change out the underlying infrastructure to give people what they want now "today". It's like building a house on a slab and a couple of years later your family wants to renovate the basement and turn it into a media room. Well, guess what?... there is no basement. So, it's going to take time to knock it all down and rebuild for the situation or (more along what RIM's doing) living in the house while rebuilding some of it at the same time and telling everyone that it'll take 2 weeks. (The Money Pit reference) I'm sure in the end it'll be nice, but damn, couldn't they have just seen the signs coming and moved quicker? They should have started on the renovations 2 years ago instead of sleeping on it and having Mike fly all over the world telling everyone that a bandwidth doom is coming and to use BB because text based email and limited MultiMedia capabilities are all you really need in a mobile device. Gee, if Mike really believes that, why is he so gung-** to implement NFC on their devices at the same time other mobile manufacturers are doing the same thing? Maybe he is learning...
    While I agree 100%, truncated emails help me keep the cost of my data plan down. Last month, I used roughly 75MB of data. That was the most usage-heavy month I've encountered in the 2.5 years I've owned my Storm. I would not be able to keep my 150MB/$15 plan if I had my sister's phone - Samsung Galaxy S. She used 2.5GB. Granted, she uses the mobile FB site 24/7 and texts like crazy, which accounts for more than 75% of data used, but I cannot imagine that having full-size emails didn't help her to get to the 2.5GB mark. Another words, I don't complain, because pressing two button will open the entire email. It's just nice to know that I don't automatically incur data charges because of the emails I don't even want to read. And if I really want to, I can download an app that will automatically open the entire email as soon as I select it. I guess it all comes down to choice. I choose the truncated way. But, Civic, you make perfect sense, nonetheless.
    02-19-11 03:11 AM
  19. i7guy's Avatar
    you sayin your wife just does what you need?
    I'm saying the reason I don't need games as a general rule is because I value human interactions. When I have downtime I'd rather cuddle with my wife than pick up my phone and start fiddling with it.

    Now when I travel alone I definitely have mind numbing diversions at hand. I have played word mole on a flight for 3 hours straight.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-19-11 10:03 AM
  20. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    While I agree 100%, truncated emails help me keep the cost of my data plan down. Last month, I used roughly 75MB of data. That was the most usage-heavy month I've encountered in the 2.5 years I've owned my Storm. I would not be able to keep my 150MB/$15 plan if I had my sister's phone - Samsung Galaxy S. She used 2.5GB. Granted, she uses the mobile FB site 24/7 and texts like crazy, which accounts for more than 75% of data used, but I cannot imagine that having full-size emails didn't help her to get to the 2.5GB mark. Another words, I don't complain, because pressing two button will open the entire email. It's just nice to know that I don't automatically incur data charges because of the emails I don't even want to read. And if I really want to, I can download an app that will automatically open the entire email as soon as I select it. I guess it all comes down to choice. I choose the truncated way. But, Civic, you make perfect sense, nonetheless.
    I think you're not aware of the fact that the BB email client only gets a small fragment of the email (any email) without trying to get it all initially. This is why you have a setting in email options for "Auto Get More". If that's enabled, when you scroll beyond a page or so of the email (depending on content), it'll get more of the email and so on until it's finished. If that option is set to Manual, you actually have to pick Get More All or Get More off the Menu to get the remaining parts of the email. Truncation doesn't happen unless the email is beyond the size that's depicted in the KB article I'm referencing in my post header info. So, really, you can easily control the amount of the size of email you get with the existing controls. Having RIM turncate email DOES NOT help you in any way based on the reason you indicated.
    02-19-11 01:02 PM
  21. aab81901's Avatar
    I think you're not aware of the fact that the BB email client only gets a small fragment of the email (any email) without trying to get it all initially. This is why you have a setting in email options for "Auto Get More". If that's enabled, when you scroll beyond a page or so of the email (depending on content), it'll get more of the email and so on until it's finished. If that option is set to Manual, you actually have to pick Get More All or Get More off the Menu to get the remaining parts of the email. Truncation doesn't happen unless the email is beyond the size that's depicted in the KB article I'm referencing in my post header info. So, really, you can easily control the amount of the size of email you get with the existing controls. Having RIM turncate email DOES NOT help you in any way based on the reason you indicated.
    I'm not in any way as technologically savy as some of the ppl on this site, but I was aware of that option. I was talking about the Get Images option BB gives you instead of automatically downloading it for you and using more data. Am I incorrect in thinking that getting images uses more data? Really, that was my main point.
    02-22-11 05:08 AM
  22. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    I'm not in any way as technologically savy as some of the ppl on this site, but I was aware of that option. I was talking about the Get Images option BB gives you instead of automatically downloading it for you and using more data. Am I incorrect in thinking that getting images uses more data? Really, that was my main point.
    No, you're not incorrect about that, but that's not the correct definition of "truncated emails". What you're talking about is image loading of HTML emails, which there are options on other smartphones to not have this done automatically, so RIM's not doing anything special with that. If you don't want imaged automatically downloaded with HTML emails, you can control that on the iPhone, for example with a simple toggle in the email setup options.
    02-22-11 08:56 AM
  23. Laura Knotek's Avatar

    Other than that, the tone you said that you drew out of it has some merit as well, but that's still all just a matter of opinion. I mean, we have a whole generation of kids growing up who have no clue of how to carry on a face-to-face conversation because they spend every spare moment of their lives on facebook; and if that's not enough, now we have facebook-themed phones being introduced. That in itself is a sad commentary on where our culture is headed. So yeah, I completely agree that we've taken mobile devices from being productivity tools to being a way of life, and it's kind of refreshing to hear that perspective from somebody pretty high up in the industry that helped to create it.

    Last night in class we discussed this issue. Technology has just exploded in the last ten years, and there are so many different entertainment options that were not available in the past. All of the vendors of these products are competing for the attention of users. People are bombarded by the many choices: gaming (and all of the platforms), media, streaming, podcasts, social networking (and all of its platforms), etc. Then there are all the various devices that can perform these functions: PCs, game consoles, TV, MP3 players, smartphones, tablets. All of the manufacturers of these items want consumers to purchase their products. Eventually, there will be convergence and certain products will dominate, which will be dictated by market forces.
    02-22-11 10:27 AM
  24. aab81901's Avatar
    No, you're not incorrect about that, but that's not the correct definition of "truncated emails". What you're talking about is image loading of HTML emails, which there are options on other smartphones to not have this done automatically, so RIM's not doing anything special with that. If you don't want imaged automatically downloaded with HTML emails, you can control that on the iPhone, for example with a simple toggle in the email setup options.
    Do you mind clarifying it for me? Either here or in PM. Thanx!
    02-24-11 04:29 AM
  25. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Do you mind clarifying it for me? Either here or in PM. Thanx!
    I pretty much did in Post 20, but here is the info on the KB article in my header notes. KB13677-"Truncated <number of bytes received>" appears in an email on the BlackBerry smartphone

    More than likely you just haven't experienced it and that's why you're not aware of it. That just means one thing; the emails you receive aren't big enough to trigger this issue. The big problem is that people think emails have to be really large to get truncated and that's not correct. For me, the issue came up at least a few times a week. I couldn't deal with it anymore.
    02-24-11 09:20 AM
125 123 ...
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD