01-26-10 02:03 PM
264 1234 ...
tools
  1. jlsparks's Avatar
    Well, if everyone else gets these outlandish deals from sprint, Why should I pay full price?
    "Everyone else" isn't. Only those looking to shirk, shortcut, and manipulate.
    12-09-09 11:25 AM
  2. Jo_795's Avatar
    This charge is for ASL customer's only, you don't want to pay it then sign up for auto pay...plain as that. .
    I just wanna clarify this. So if my bill is automatically deducted from my bank account already i wont have to pay this .40 charge? its only for the people who are suppose to send in there bills right?
    12-09-09 01:59 PM
  3. Jo_795's Avatar
    I understand were your coming from Babyk80 it all make sense BUT
    When I call to get out due to rate hike ,tell them Im moving onto Verizon I will then get transferred to cancellations were lets make a deal kicks in.
    Some may think its pretty lame to use such tactic but hey ,Sprint out to make money and I want to save some.
    you stated you did it last time.. and your tryign to do it again. in my eyes you seem shabby and greedy.. but thats my eyes .. stuff like this hurts the company you already saved on your plans... just my 2 cents...
    12-09-09 02:05 PM
  4. papped's Avatar
    you stated you did it last time.. and your tryign to do it again. in my eyes you seem shabby and greedy.. but thats my eyes .. stuff like this hurts the company you already saved on your plans... just my 2 cents...
    So then it would be justified if you didn't feel like you were saving on your plans?

    It's called the terms of the contract, and if they break some terms, then they are SOL... Not to mention they don't even really make it easy to get out when times like this come around even though you can legally.

    If you think the company is in trouble, then you can donate them some $10 checks here and there to keep them afloat. I somehow don't think people at Sprint are worried when the customer breaks some terms and ends up owing them money that it might hurt the customer financially...
    12-09-09 03:22 PM
  5. michikade's Avatar
    I pay $20-$30 less for my plan than I would for a similar plan elsewhere. 40c isn't going to sway me. If it was $40 I'd take issue.

    I'm not necessarily a Sprint fangirl (I signed up originally so I could talk to my friends for free, my family is all on AT&T) but I've compared plan prices. I get excellent coverage with Sprint here (and now we have 4G coverage - wooohoooo!), so something that will change my bill less than a dollar isn't going to make me leave.
    12-09-09 03:31 PM
  6. flyawaymike's Avatar
    Hmm I will get out of contract ,Purchase 9650 at new customer price back on contract.
    Did it last rate hike & will do it on this one
    Exactly what am i thinking right now.

    i love sprint.
    I believe Sprint requires 90 days for you to be a new customer again, so you're not going to be able to do that, without porting your number to a pre-paid carrier for a few months, then porting it back.
    12-09-09 04:44 PM
  7. flyawaymike's Avatar
    What I am still finding hard to understand is, Is it 30 days from being informed of the coming change or 30 days from the day that the change goes into effect?

    I would at least like to get sprint to get me on a retention plan or some sort of deal based on this "materially adverse change."
    I really wouldn't call 40 cents "adverse" change.
    12-09-09 05:06 PM
  8. conan1071's Avatar
    so what this is saying is that when I get my bill I can call and cancel both of my lines by saying a terms of service change??? its that simple?
    12-09-09 05:47 PM
  9. KentuckyHouse's Avatar
    I can understand and appreciate everyone that's taking exception with those of us who are interested in (possibly) taking advantage of this.

    My point would be this. Yes, I signed a contract. Yes, that contract probably stated that Sprint could change things like this at their leisure. Was I forced to sign said contract? No.

    BUT...what good is a contract if they can just change the terms or rates or surcharges just like that? And, that being said, and I'm no contract lawyer, but would it even still be considered a contract and if so, why? How does that contract protect MY interests??? It seems to me, it only protects SPRINT'S interests, and that's just not right.

    Of course I don't think .40 is that big of a deal, I'd be crazy to. But if they're going to change one word of the contract that I signed, then I should be given the opportunity to say no, I don't want to change it and allowed to go on my merry way without penalty. It's their choice to change the terms and it should be my choice not to have to go along with it and not be slammed for doing so.

    I don't think that makes those of us that want to know more or are interested in taking this route bad people and I don't appreciate those of you who've insinuated that.
    12-09-09 06:43 PM
  10. flyawaymike's Avatar
    I can understand and appreciate everyone that's taking exception with those of us who are interested in (possibly) taking advantage of this.

    My point would be this. Yes, I signed a contract. Yes, that contract probably stated that Sprint could change things like this at their leisure. Was I forced to sign said contract? No.

    BUT...what good is a contract if they can just change the terms or rates or surcharges just like that? And, that being said, and I'm no contract lawyer, but would it even still be considered a contract and if so, why? How does that contract protect MY interests??? It seems to me, it only protects SPRINT'S interests, and that's just not right.

    Of course I don't think .40 is that big of a deal, I'd be crazy to. But if they're going to change one word of the contract that I signed, then I should be given the opportunity to say no, I don't want to change it and allowed to go on my merry way without penalty. It's their choice to change the terms and it should be my choice not to have to go along with it and not be slammed for doing so.

    I don't think that makes those of us that want to know more or are interested in taking this route bad people and I don't appreciate those of you who've insinuated that.
    you're statement is completely contradictory. you said you're point is that you are aware that you signed a contract that stated that fee can be changed and that you accept that... but then that it should be your choice not to accept what you just signed if you don't like it?

    that's basically summary, and not to completely come across as an a**, but your statements come across to me as just whining... "yes i signed a contract that said so and so... but I don't think it's fair".

    Look, if you don't agree with the additional charge, and you're eligible to take advantage of that termination - then do it. Otherwise, it just sounds like whining about fairness.
    12-09-09 06:59 PM
  11. Jo_795's Avatar
    So then it would be justified if you didn't feel like you were saving on your plans?

    It's called the terms of the contract, and if they break some terms, then they are SOL... Not to mention they don't even really make it easy to get out when times like this come around even though you can legally.

    If you think the company is in trouble, then you can donate them some $10 checks here and there to keep them afloat. I somehow don't think people at Sprint are worried when the customer breaks some terms and ends up owing them money that it might hurt the customer financially...
    it wouldnt be justified at all.. its called taking advatange of the system.. thats why you see $1 phones on ebay. so you call it justified to cheat or trick the system??
    12-09-09 07:14 PM
  12. KentuckyHouse's Avatar
    flyawaymike, I can see how my statement would be taken that way, and maybe it is contradictory.

    I guess the point I was trying to make is, I don't see how it's fair to the consumer that a company can just change some random charge in your contract. Yes, they're giving notification and apparently giving those of us who might be looking for a way out a way to do it (maybe). But why do we sign a contract at all if they can just change things whenever they feel like it? Isn't that the point of a contract in the first place?

    And sure, I have no doubt that somewhere in all those pages and pages of fine print it states that they reserve the right to do this, but really, who the heck reads every word of their cell phone contract standing there in the store? And I'm sorry, but if a single person says they did, you are flat lying.

    Is that the consumer's fault for not reading all that fine print? Sure, I guess it can be laid at their feet. But why do companies do that? Because THEY KNOW no one reads it and they know they've got you by the b*lls once you sign on the dotted line.

    Now, all that being said, is this .20 increase a big deal? No, absolutely not. And I would think that most people wouldn't take the opportunity to get out of their contract because of it. I'm not even saying I'm going to. And that's what Sprint or any other company is banking on when they do something like this. It's either too much trouble or customers have brand loyalty and most will choose not to take advantage of it.

    I just don't understand why people have to come into this thread and bash the ones that do want to take advantage of it or just express an interest in wanting to know more.
    12-09-09 08:01 PM
  13. empirez32's Avatar
    I love threads designed to encourage people to not live up to their contractual obligations. You signed the contract. Presumably you weren't forced to do so. If you don't like the service then do what's right, pay up, and move on. WTF is happening to personal responsibility?
    Personal responsibilty ha! sprint should be asking them selves that same question. ive worked for sprint and there f' ups on customers bills month after month, and there bad coverage and customer service they shouldnt be surprised people want to leave, and not have any remorse for trying to get out without paying a ETF. Sprint has themselves to blame for this trying happening.
    12-09-09 08:24 PM
  14. papped's Avatar
    It's not even taking advantage... The terms state you can do it. A lot of the time they tell you that you can't even though you can (lying or being stupidly uninformed in other words)...
    12-09-09 08:31 PM
  15. jlsparks's Avatar
    flyawaymike, I can see how my statement would be taken that way, and maybe it is contradictory.

    I guess the point I was trying to make is, I don't see how it's fair to the consumer that a company can just change some random charge in your contract. Yes, they're giving notification and apparently giving those of us who might be looking for a way out a way to do it (maybe). But why do we sign a contract at all if they can just change things whenever they feel like it? Isn't that the point of a contract in the first place?

    And sure, I have no doubt that somewhere in all those pages and pages of fine print it states that they reserve the right to do this, but really, who the heck reads every word of their cell phone contract standing there in the store? And I'm sorry, but if a single person says they did, you are flat lying.

    Is that the consumer's fault for not reading all that fine print? Sure, I guess it can be laid at their feet. But why do companies do that? Because THEY KNOW no one reads it and they know they've got you by the b*lls once you sign on the dotted line.

    Now, all that being said, is this .20 increase a big deal? No, absolutely not. And I would think that most people wouldn't take the opportunity to get out of their contract because of it. I'm not even saying I'm going to. And that's what Sprint or any other company is banking on when they do something like this. It's either too much trouble or customers have brand loyalty and most will choose not to take advantage of it.

    I just don't understand why people have to come into this thread and bash the ones that do want to take advantage of it or just express an interest in wanting to know more.
    1. The contract you voluntarily (by your own admission) entered into contained certain clauses. Included therein were statements made by the carrier that it retained the right to change certain surcharges;
    2. Yes, a contract that allows one party to modify terms is still enforceable, since both parties entered into it and the terms were not unconscionable. Think about your service agreement with your power company (LG&E/KY Utilities, etc...) Yes, you have an agreement with them. By having them connect their utility to your house you implicitly entered into an agreement. Under that agreement you're obligated to pay on time. Additionally, under that agreement they are entitled to (and as you know, frequently do) seek increases in gas and electric rates from the PUC. If the increases are approved your next bill is higher, and you have no recourse. Why? Because the terms of the agreement permit them to seek increases.

    Now, do I agree with the ethics of contracts that permit unilateral modification (even if the modification isn't material)? No. I don't. The contracts law I was taught emphasized agreement between parties based upon bargained for and negotiated terms. That works well when, for example, crafting a marital settlement agreement in a divorce case. But when we have to interact with "big business" it's typically on their terms. So I really do understand where you and others are coming from on this.

    However, at the end of the day, I just morally, ethically, and legally come down on the side of fulfilling ones contractual obligation or, if one doesn't want to do that, paying the price agreed to under the contract.
    12-09-09 08:43 PM
  16. jlsparks's Avatar
    Personal responsibilty ha! sprint should be asking them selves that same question. ive worked for sprint and there f' ups on customers bills month after month, and there bad coverage and customer service they shouldnt be surprised people want to leave, and not have any remorse for trying to get out without paying a ETF. Sprint has themselves to blame for this trying happening.
    If the service was so poor why'd they sign up in the first place? Why'd they agree to the ETF? Sort of like eating 3/4 of a steak then complaining that it was undercooked and you want it for free.
    12-09-09 08:48 PM
  17. papped's Avatar
    I don't think you can really draw a parallel between energy company rate increases and cell phone service various fee increases as simply as you are...

    Regardless, I don't see a single point to this other than you having some moral objection that means nothing to anybody else... Nobody is going to stop doing this because of some statement from random person X about morality on this thread. Matter of fact the opposite might happen from the repeated bumping of this thread...
    Last edited by papped; 12-09-09 at 08:53 PM.
    12-09-09 08:50 PM
  18. empirez32's Avatar
    I completley agree with Papped, ppl are gonna do what they want to regardless of one or multiple peoples moral issue with it. We all know that the united states legal system are a fraud and continually use loop holes and un ethical ways everyday. so we call all stop BS ourselves with this moral speech of whats right and wrong.
    12-09-09 09:10 PM
  19. Dsmithjr's Avatar
    This thread's gone a little off topic. I'll be honest, I don't understand the issue with this at all. It's not a moral issue if you don't agree to the new terms. What the **** are we talking about here?! If, indeed, Sprint asks you to agree to the new terms, then they're admitting that they're changing the original contract terms you signed into. If you don't like their changes, you're free to deny the new terms and leave the contract. How is this a moral issue?

    I also find it amusing that people say you shouldn't complain over an amount like $0.40. Why don't you try this: call Sprint and tell them that you've decided to lower the amount you're going to pay them each month for the entirety of your contract by $0.40 per line. I wonder what they'll do? If $0.40 per line is a big deal to Sprint, then it stands to reason that it's also a big deal to some of Sprint's customers.

    I also think it's worth noting that many of the people here and on fatwallet are interested in getting out of their contract but still remaining with Sprint. It shows that Sprint is doing something right; even if it's only their great prices. That, at least, should be a plus for Sprint.
    12-09-09 09:15 PM
  20. Babyk80's Avatar
    I just wanna clarify this. So if my bill is automatically deducted from my bank account already i wont have to pay this .40 charge? its only for the people who are suppose to send in there bills right?

    Sorry I mixed this article up w/another one. The fee that's coming for ASL's is $4.99 per line per month I believe and if you set yourself up on autopay then the $4.99 per line or per acct is waived.

    Two totally different articles.
    I apologise for the confusion my fault.
    12-09-09 10:49 PM
  21. Babyk80's Avatar
    flyawaymike, I can see how my statement would be taken that way, and maybe it is contradictory.

    I guess the point I was trying to make is, I don't see how it's fair to the consumer that a company can just change some random charge in your contract. Yes, they're giving notification and apparently giving those of us who might be looking for a way out a way to do it (maybe). But why do we sign a contract at all if they can just change things whenever they feel like it? Isn't that the point of a contract in the first place?

    And sure, I have no doubt that somewhere in all those pages and pages of fine print it states that they reserve the right to do this, but really, who the heck reads every word of their cell phone contract standing there in the store? And I'm sorry, but if a single person says they did, you are flat lying.

    Is that the consumer's fault for not reading all that fine print? Sure, I guess it can be laid at their feet. But why do companies do that? Because THEY KNOW no one reads it and they know they've got you by the b*lls once you sign on the dotted line.

    Now, all that being said, is this .20 increase a big deal? No, absolutely not. And I would think that most people wouldn't take the opportunity to get out of their contract because of it. I'm not even saying I'm going to. And that's what Sprint or any other company is banking on when they do something like this. It's either too much trouble or customers have brand loyalty and most will choose not to take advantage of it.

    I just don't understand why people have to come into this thread and bash the ones that do want to take advantage of it or just express an interest in wanting to know more.
    If you're honestly p*ssed about the 40cents then see what you can do about it. I don't think its those people that are being bashed. I think the ones that are getting bashed here are the ones sitting on the sidelines waiting for Sprint to do something minimal like this so they can work the system as much as humanly possible in order to get what they want. And in that case they definately deserve a bashing.
    12-09-09 10:57 PM
  22. snakester9's Avatar
    If you're honestly p*ssed about the 40cents then see what you can do about it. I don't think its those people that are being bashed. I think the ones that are getting bashed here are the ones sitting on the sidelines waiting for Sprint to do something minimal like this so they can work the system as much as humanly possible in order to get what they want. And in that case they definately deserve a bashing.
    I just found out that my bill's going up by $5, with the ASL increase. I don't have horrible credit (I have a short-ish credit history, but everything's been paid on time, I'm just young), I've paid all my bills on time, I'm not a deadbeat. Yet sprint's raising MY bill because other people can't pay THEIRS? I wanna cancel just on principle. That's NOT good business, especially when you're trying to come back from bad history.
    12-10-09 12:25 AM
  23. aaronhome27's Avatar
    Got my Sprint bill today. The regulatory increase is stated on there. I currently pay $.20 per line and it will increase to $.40 per line. I wil have to pay a whole $.60 more on my bills after 1/1/10. I may contact them to cancel the contract so that I dont have that lingering over my head but I am happy with my current phones and service. I just dont like being under contract as any unforeseen event in life might happen and I might have to leave my Sprint service. I just dont like having the ETF hanging over my head.
    12-10-09 09:18 AM
  24. its_miller_time's Avatar
    Just an FYI, you cannot cancel and go Month-to-Month with this, it is either you cancel and go elsewhere or agree to the terms and stay. You can go to retentions and see what they will offer you to "retain" your current contract. I did this when they raised one of the fees on texts or the 411 increase or something back in 2007. I was able to get a free Rumor and a Palm Centro at new customer price for agreeing to stay and retain my current service. (They offered this to me, I didn't ask). I asked what my rights were regarding this change, they told me I could cancel. I said, okay, let's do that. Then she offered me these deals and I was like, okay, that works.

    Oh, and don't pay your bill on it that has the notification if you plan on cancelling - paying your bill means you agree to the new terms...

    I am very happy with Sprint, their service and coverage and have no problems with them. I just want some new blackberry or android devices...
    12-10-09 09:45 AM
  25. aaronhome27's Avatar
    Thanks for the heads up. I was not aware of some of the information you pointed out there. I really do not want to leave Sprint or cancel service with them. I will probably just let this one ride.
    12-10-09 10:27 AM
264 1234 ...
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD