1. anon1727506's Avatar
    BYOD: If You Think You're Saving Money, Think Again


    "It's the battle hymn of the mobile worker: They want to use their personal iPhones, iPads and Android devices instead of company-issued BlackBerry smartphones and PlayBooks to get their jobs done. It's part of a growing trend called BYOD, or bring-your-own-device. ..."
    04-05-12 01:34 PM
  2. ekv's Avatar
    BYOD: If You Think You're Saving Money, Think Again


    "It's the battle hymn of the mobile worker: They want to use their personal iPhones, iPads and Android devices instead of company-issued BlackBerry smartphones and PlayBooks to get their jobs done. It's part of a growing trend called BYOD, or bring-your-own-device. ..."
    I have said this earlier also. Will say it again.

    I will agree with byod, when police depth and armed forces say bring your own gun.
    Welcome to the army. And by the way, bring your own tank.

    Won't that be a winner
    Barljo likes this.
    04-06-12 12:01 AM
  3. Rootbrian's Avatar
    If I ever manage to land a job in an area that uses blackberries, my wind blackberry will be brought into it and blackberry balance installed on it, if they use BES, BESx or mubile fusion. I'll also gladly accept a work blackberry too, if they strongly recommend it. I'm not picky. Heck, I wouldn't complain if they handed me a big blue!
    04-06-12 03:42 AM
  4. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    The Purely financial factor of BYOD vs CO devices shows long term increased costs with BYOD.

    BUT often in the BYOD markets the Employee's are the income generating source for the company and if they are disenfranchised with their company because the company issued devices don't meet their needs, then they wont perform as well.

    it is a balancing act for company's to decide which is more important, and which will result in better employee's and better balance sheets.
    Hopefully with the introduction of RIM having Full touchscreen devices and that being a popular form factor more people will choose RIM devices and company's can return to a CO program from a BYOD for the cost savings while maintaining happy employee's
    quik4life likes this.
    04-06-12 08:43 AM
  5. Economist101's Avatar
    I have said this earlier also. Will say it again.

    I will agree with byod, when police depth and armed forces say bring your own gun.
    Welcome to the army. And by the way, bring your own tank.

    Won't that be a winner
    Good point. I mean, I see tanks down at the AT&T store all the time. Cell phone, tank. . .no real distinction there.

    As for "bring your own gun," many police officers would love to bring their own guns, as they don't care for what is issued to them.
    JBenn911 likes this.
    04-06-12 09:00 AM
  6. sleepngbear's Avatar
    The Purely financial factor of BYOD vs CO devices shows long term increased costs with BYOD.

    BUT often in the BYOD markets the Employee's are the income generating source for the company and if they are disenfranchised with their company because the company issued devices don't meet their needs, then they wont perform as well.

    it is a balancing act for company's to decide which is more important, and which will result in better employee's and better balance sheets.
    Hopefully with the introduction of RIM having Full touchscreen devices and that being a popular form factor more people will choose RIM devices and company's can return to a CO program from a BYOD for the cost savings while maintaining happy employee's
    I still think that part of this disenfranchisement many users feel in regards to being 'stuck with' a BB has to do with the fact that they are locked down to varying degrees depending on the rules applied through BES by different organizations. I was fortunate enough to have purchased my own BB with the intent of connecting to my company's BES, so I was aware of its capabilities before it was 'locked down'. But for other people who are issued a phone that is already secured and are unable to load anything or alter the device in any way, it is very easy to understand why so many people have the perception that the fault lies with the BB brand as a whole. Yes, BB has its obvious deficiencies in some areas when compared to other platforms, particularly in the area of apps. But that perception is exacerbated by limitations placed on such a significant population of these users that are on a BES plan.

    Even when employees are allowed to BYOD, those other devices still will not be as limited as most BB's on a BES. To your point, though, I have to wonder if users' perceptions will change if their own devices are suddenly limited due to restrictions placed on them in order to be connected to their businesses. Still, it will be interesting to see how businesses react if/when they determine that BYOD is costing them more in the long run than BB; i.e., will they stay the course and suck it up or revert to company-issued BB's for business use.
    04-06-12 09:07 AM
  7. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    I still think that part of this disenfranchisement many users feel in regards to being 'stuck with' a BB has to do with the fact that they are locked down to varying degrees depending on the rules applied through BES by different organizations. I was fortunate enough to have purchased my own BB with the intent of connecting to my company's BES, so I was aware of its capabilities before it was 'locked down'. But for other people who are issued a phone that is already secured and are unable to load anything or alter the device in any way, it is very easy to understand why so many people have the perception that the fault lies with the BB brand as a whole. Yes, BB has its obvious deficiencies in some areas when compared to other platforms, particularly in the area of apps. But that perception is exacerbated by limitations placed on such a significant population of these users that are on a BES plan.

    Even when employees are allowed to BYOD, those other devices still will not be as limited as most BB's on a BES. To your point, though, I have to wonder if users' perceptions will change if their own devices are suddenly limited due to restrictions placed on them in order to be connected to their businesses. Still, it will be interesting to see how businesses react if/when they determine that BYOD is costing them more in the long run than BB; i.e., will they stay the course and suck it up or revert to company-issued BB's for business use.
    RIM is addressing the locked down issue with BlackBerry Balance for BlackBerry's, and Mobile fusion for non BlackBerry's

    As Enterprise IT departments really start to get control over the BYOD devices which is something they haven't had the same time to do and learn as they did with BlackBerry's and BES, the happiness factor of having an iPhone with no apps, and Android phones stuck at stock the feeling of how bad BlackBerry is will hopefully be realized that the controls limit the devices,
    but that isn't to say if you are a "viewer" vs a "doer" the iPhone/Android even without apps can still be more enjoyable than the company issued 9360
    04-06-12 09:26 AM
  8. undone's Avatar
    As for "bring your own gun," many police officers would love to bring their own guns, as they don't care for what is issued to them.
    Well I wouldnt want to see that. There are usually decent reasons for not letting them use there own weapons, whether its cost, shell type/penetration, servicability etc. I could be wrong, but I think back up weapons can be 'whatever' within some sort of reasonable list of acceptable calibers.
    04-06-12 09:52 AM
  9. 1magine's Avatar
    As I have indicated on these boards several times, my firm along with a half dozen others allowed users to drop their BBs in favor of I-phones. The I-phones connect through VPN to our BES using Airwatch. Password protection and device encryption are strictly enforced. Nearly a year later and more and more associates and partners have left their BB devices behind.

    Here's the thing about security - Not every business, even one that deals in secure information, and that is our entire lifeblood, needs to have all matter of BES security pushed down to their device. A JAG officer in Fort Dix does not need an armored up HumVee or a Sherman tank to take him to the mess hall, sure he is a soldier in a time of war, and sure he would be as safe and secure as humanly possible to getting there - - but it is an unnecessary and expensive waste. I often find the same is true in the corporate world. Where dozens of unneccessary BES policies are deployed. And even with that said, BBs are very capable handsets, but even fully outside the scope of available applications are not as robust as other handsets. The Java enviroment is terribly limitited and limiting. It's why the Playbook abandoned it, and the handhelds will abandon it before year's end.
    04-06-12 10:03 AM
  10. undone's Avatar
    Still, it will be interesting to see how businesses react if/when they determine that BYOD is costing them more in the long run than BB; i.e., will they stay the course and suck it up or revert to company-issued BB's for business use.
    When RIM has there comparable devices and is off there JAVA based OS you should see some changes in the dynamic. Significant upgrade discounts for existing corporate clients can help give the new platform a cost difference from BYOD.
    04-06-12 10:04 AM
  11. rrrebo's Avatar
    Thorsten stated they wanted to make BB10 the device employees WANTED to bring for BYOD. I hope they can sell it.
    04-06-12 12:51 PM
  12. YorkieRay's Avatar
    BYOD actually should mean Buy Your Own Device.
    I wasn't aware that my own company had been allowing iPhones and Androids on to the networks until I saw a note on the IT support website saying that they had run out of Good licences. The standard company issue smartphone is currently a BB.
    I don't have a company phone, but I don't think that if I had an iPhone I would tollerate having my employers restricting how I can use my own phone. Also, from the company's point of view, an employee is less likely to switch off or ignore their own phone when they are off duty.
    04-08-12 06:46 AM
  13. OniBerry's Avatar
    Good Points.

    My own company does not have a byod plan in place, nor is it planning on one. They allowed iPads and PlayBooks to be used and I believe they are taking a wait and see approach to decide how they want to proceed.

    More often than not, people who are issued a work phone usually have a personal one as well. I would not want my personal device to have anything to do with work. When I leave work (unless I am on call) my work phone goes off everyday after work and on week-ends and holidays.

    From an employer's pov. If said employee has an agreement to answer his/her phone after hours (personal or issued) and they do not, they will be usually looking for another employer soon.
    04-08-12 07:02 AM
  14. qbnkelt's Avatar
    RIM is addressing the locked down issue with BlackBerry Balance for BlackBerry's, and Mobile fusion for non BlackBerry's

    As Enterprise IT departments really start to get control over the BYOD devices which is something they haven't had the same time to do and learn as they did with BlackBerry's and BES, the happiness factor of having an iPhone with no apps, and Android phones stuck at stock the feeling of how bad BlackBerry is will hopefully be realized that the controls limit the devices,
    but that isn't to say if you are a "viewer" vs a "doer" the iPhone/Android even without apps can still be more enjoyable than the company issued 9360
    The bolded part is what gets me.

    As an aside.....I do not want to have to deal with work emails, calls or work communications while on weekends or holidays. My work BB is very lightly monitored on weekends and left behind on holidays. And I like it that way.
    04-08-12 07:08 AM
  15. qbnkelt's Avatar
    BYOD actually should mean Buy Your Own Device.
    I wasn't aware that my own company had been allowing iPhones and Androids on to the networks until I saw a note on the IT support website saying that they had run out of Good licences. The standard company issue smartphone is currently a BB.
    I don't have a company phone, but I don't think that if I had an iPhone I would tollerate having my employers restricting how I can use my own phone. Also, from the company's point of view, an employee is less likely to switch off or ignore their own phone when they are off duty.
    To say nothing of the fact that Good does not even come close to full BES functionalities that we deem necessary at work.
    04-08-12 07:10 AM
  16. berklon's Avatar
    My company doesn't have an official BYOD plan in place... right not it's requires special permission to have your own iPhone/Android device on our infrastructure. But that will change any day now - as we're currently using Good to handle these device exceptions.

    Now with RIM's Mobile Fusion platform, it's all guaranteed.

    We have a ton of users who will drop their BBs and go with their already existing personal device or will run out and buy one. A lot of our users have been wanting to jump ship for a long time - the BB7 devices many currently have just didn't cut it.
    04-08-12 08:42 AM
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