08-02-16 10:26 PM
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  1. sorinv's Avatar
    Baidu isn't installed on the Nexus. You're spreading FUD.
    I did not write that Baidu was installed on Nexus, nor did I write about your apps and the apps on your phone. Don't take it personally;-) I don't know who you are, what phone you use, what apps you download. I have better things to do than to spy or datamine others.

    The link is about Baidu. The Huawei part is unrelated to this link. It is independent of Baidu. It is with or without Baidu. Baidu is just an example of apps that spy on you. In this case introduced intentionally by the Chinese to spy and used speculatively and ironically by the 5-eyes to do the same.
    Just like the Chinese and the Russian secret services take advantage of the flaws introduced by the NSA in Linux, and other public software to spy on all of us and even on US government employees.
    It's an interesting and incestuous collaboration.
    Last edited by sorinv; 04-29-16 at 01:16 AM.
    04-28-16 11:02 PM
  2. Jack Chin's Avatar
    I wasn't referring to Chen. I was referring to those who repeat slogans like "robots from the 1950s". The robots of today are much smarter.
    Yeah. . .we got that.

    What you fail to grasp is that the phrase 'robots from the 1950s' doesn't have an expiration date. Something can be both robotic, and anachronistically or incompetently so. It's precisely for this reason that the term has rhetorical value.

    Posted via CB10
    04-28-16 11:10 PM
  3. Jack Chin's Avatar
    By the way, you know what happens when Chen speaks publicly. He puts his foot in his mouth...
    Good God, I can't imagine he has any teeth left. How does he eat?!

    Posted via CB10
    04-28-16 11:12 PM
  4. sorinv's Avatar
    Good God, I can't imagine he has any teeth left. How does he eat?!

    Posted via CB10
    He doesn't. He is an android.
    raves68 and GadgetTravel like this.
    04-28-16 11:26 PM
  5. Jack Chin's Avatar
    He doesn't. He is an android.
    Hah.

    Posted via CB10
    04-28-16 11:29 PM
  6. johnny_bravo72's Avatar
    Indeed, Elvis and and chairman Jobs rule and support Bb10 from the grave.
    Dead celebrities supporting a dead OS. Perfect!

    *C5303
    JeepBB likes this.
    04-28-16 11:53 PM
  7. Jack Chin's Avatar
    Dead celebrities supporting a dead OS. Perfect!

    *C5303
    I hear Liberace is a big Palm fan. They'll have to take it from his cold, dead hand.



    Posted via CB10
    JeepBB likes this.
    04-29-16 12:14 AM
  8. sorinv's Avatar
    Dead celebrities supporting a dead OS. Perfect!

    *C5303
    Obviously, since they both died before BB10 was released and one of them when Lazaridis was in grade school and was developing apps for android.
    04-29-16 01:17 AM
  9. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    I did not write that Baidu was installed on Nexus, nor did I write about your apps and the apps on your phone. Don't take it personally;-) I don't know who you are, what phone you use, what apps you download. I have better things to do that to spy or datamine others.

    The link is about Baidu. The Huawei part is unrelated to this link. It is independent of Baidu. It is with or without Baidu. Baidu is just an example of apps that spy on you. In this case introduced intentionally by the Chinese to spy and used speculatively and ironically by the 5-eyes to do the same.
    Just like the Chinese and the Russian secret services take advantage of the flaws introduced by the NSA in Linux, and other public software to spy on all of us and even on US government employees.
    It's an interesting and incestuous collaboration.
    Yes, the link is about Baidu. But the Huawei part is totally related because you made it related in the post below, last sentence:

    "The market is rigged and monopolized" is much closer to reality.
    Try using Google or any app and select to pay instead of being spied upon.
    See if you can
    . And the government's are colluding instead of enforcing the existing privacy laws.

    It's like the terrorists put a gun to your head and ask you to choose between death by hanging or by beheading. Some choice, some market!

    The app fiasco has become so ridiculous that chines and 5-eyes security agencies are cooperating for equal opportunity spying on everyone through each other's app security flaws...

    https://citizenlab.org/2016/02/priva...baidu-browser/

    This was on BBC Radio today, adding that the 5-eyes ‎agencies figured it out and use Baidu's apps to spy on everybody.
    It's hilarious. Equal opportunity surveillance shared between the Chinese and the West.
    You are doubly spied upon if you use apps or Chinese android phones like nexus 6p from Huawei, Google's phone
    .
    You can't be "doubly spied on", as you put it, unless you had the app on the phone. But no worries there; the Nexus 6p doesn't come with Baidu, you'd only install it if you lived in the East - we have Google, Baidu is the search giant there. So that's out, and the phone itself can't do anything because it's just parts without software to make it all work. That software is AOSP Android, which does not call home to China or anywhere else other than Google if you allow it to, for use with Google Now and/or On Tap. And speaking of apps, if it has a purchase button, and MANY apps do, it can be purchased if so desired. So I really don't get how nor why you'd equate that with terrorism in addition to saying it's not possible. It's very possible - if I don't want ads, or if the trial period is over, I can then buy those apps if I so choose.

    And lastly, the NSA has not compromised the Linux kernel. They developed and maintain SELinux, but there are no flaws or backdoors. There's a few thousand people that would have noticed and torn the Internet asunder, including Linus Torvalds.
    JeepBB and Ronindan like this.
    04-29-16 02:46 AM
  10. DrBoomBotz's Avatar
    "The market is rigged and monopolized" is much closer to reality.
    Luckily you were able to discern the truth.

    This is why BlackBerry had to go Android-aliensamonguscover.jpg
    johnny_bravo72 and JeepBB like this.
    04-29-16 08:39 AM
  11. anon(6038817)'s Avatar
    Luckily you were able to discern the truth.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is why BlackBerry had to go Android-they-live.jpg
    DrBoomBotz, Uzi, JeepBB and 1 others like this.
    04-29-16 10:08 AM
  12. BlackberryFan777's Avatar
    Here's a visualization I created of Kantar WorldPanel data from the past 4 years.

    Attachment 398160

    Click this link for the interactive dashboard: https://public.tableau.com/views/Kan...es&:showTabs=y

    It's difficult to really understand how far BB10/BBOS market share has fallen - and how long it has been falling - until you see a visualization like this.

    You see the purple section of the area chart? That's BlackBerry's BB10/BBOS. Even at its thickest back in 2012 it was only about 11% of the total worldwide market share (of the countries for which Kantar had data).

    Now it is a few tenths of one percent.

    BlackBerry needed to see that purple section get larger from 2013 forward in order to stay the course with BB10. But that didn't happen. They really had no other alternative but to go Android to try to save their handset business.

    Despite what the armchair CEOs claim, no amount of marketing, apps, or bleeding-edge hardware specs could have stemmed the tide of iOS and Android. It's obvious that, to have any chance of remaining competitive in the handset market, BlackBerry needed to make drastic changes back when they were still called RIM and Mike and Jim were in charge.

    At the end of the day, BB10 is my platform. I'm enjoying my Q10 and Z10 (I've also owned a Q5 and Z30 in the past) and plan to get a Passport. I'll ride the BB10 train to the end of the line and hope that by then BlackBerry's Android offerings are still around and much improved from the PRIV.
    As you probably know if you read my posts, I disagree.

    First, BlackBerry's representation in that visualization will decrease to zero with the transition to Android as each Priv sold is not marketshare for BlackBerry, but marketshare for Google as the Priv runs Google's Android platform. The Priv doesn't help address the problem. And it moves fewer devices than BB10, as well.

    Second, I agree that the visualization shows that BlackBerry 10 is not competing in the overall smartphone market, but it's entirely possible for BlackBerry to succeed as a niche, low volume handset provider if they have their own platform with strong differentation. I don't see that possibility with Android and as I predicted, Android sold fewer units at launch with more marketing resources than BB10 flagships. Quite literally, Android made things much, much worse form a sales volume standpoint, but saved on expenses. In other words, BlackBerry is now just trying to acheive revenue from brand loyalists by providing us phones that say BlackBerry on it without committing itself to the costs of actually making BlackBerry platform devices.

    Also, we'll never know for sure, but it seems to me as if the only time BB10 was actually supported as a platform was under Thor. If MIke L would have returned instead of John Chen as CEO, I think BlackBerry would probably be moving between 10 and 15 million handsets per year, hardware wouldn't be a separate division, but it would still be a little short of breaking even merely devices sold, and the company as a whole would already have returned to profitability with many additional revenue sources for BlackBerry's platform on the horizon.

    The Z10 sold five million units. Heck, Thor had a profitable quarter after the Z10 launch. Much of the problem here was how the Board's consultant, John Chen, handled Thor's move to take the company private and has mismanaged the company since. I've also got to tell you that I think Mike L can make a better phone than Apple. I'm not sure that has anything to do with sales and I suspect the iPhone 7 will be awesome, but with real distinguishing benefits, you can reach 5 million phones a quarter. There are tens of millions of iPhone owners who don't login to the app store at all (because they've lost their password, think it's a hassle, don't use apps, are enterprise users, or whatever) -- there are a lot of niche users who aren't being better served by iOS/Android generics.
    04-29-16 12:01 PM
  13. anon(6038817)'s Avatar
    As you probably know if you read my posts, I disagree.

    First, BlackBerry's representation in that visualization will decrease to zero with the transition to Android as each Priv sold is not marketshare for BlackBerry, but marketshare for Google as the Priv runs Google's Android platform. The Priv doesn't help address the problem. And it moves fewer devices than BB10, as well.
    I thought I made it pretty clear that BlackBerry's OS represented in the charts is BB10 and BBOS (legacy), not BlackBerry's Android phone(s). The point was to illustrate the decline and the reasoning for going Android. Certainly, they have a much better chance if they can carve out even a few percent of Android market share than with three tenths of one percent in BB10/BBOS, wouldn't you agree?

    Second, I agree that the visualization shows that BlackBerry 10 is not competing in the overall smartphone market, but it's entirely possible for BlackBerry to succeed as a niche, low volume handset provider if they have their own platform with strong differentation. I don't see that possibility with Android and as I predicted, Android sold fewer units at launch with more marketing resources than BB10 flagships. Quite literally, Android made things much, much worse form a sales volume standpoint, but saved on expenses. In other words, BlackBerry is now just trying to acheive revenue from brand loyalists by providing us phones that say BlackBerry on it without committing itself to the costs of actually making BlackBerry platform devices.

    Also, we'll never know for sure, but it seems to me as if the only time BB10 was actually supported as a platform was under Thor. If MIke L would have returned instead of John Chen as CEO, I think BlackBerry would probably be moving between 10 and 15 million handsets per year, hardware wouldn't be a separate division, but it would still be a little short of breaking even merely devices sold, and the company as a whole would already have returned to profitability with many additional revenue sources for BlackBerry's platform on the horizon.

    The Z10 sold five million units. Heck, Thor had a profitable quarter after the Z10 launch. Much of the problem here was how the Board's consultant, John Chen, handled Thor's move to take the company private and has mismanaged the company since. I've also got to tell you that I think Mike L can make a better phone than Apple. I'm not sure that has anything to do with sales and I suspect the iPhone 7 will be awesome, but with real distinguishing benefits, you can reach 5 million phones a quarter. There are tens of millions of iPhone owners who don't login to the app store at all (because they've lost their password, think it's a hassle, don't use apps, are enterprise users, or whatever) -- there are a lot of niche users who aren't being better served by iOS/Android generics.
    Did you read about Apple's latest results? Sales of the iPhone are slowing for the first time. Global smartphone sales are slowing, in general, especially the high-end market. BB10 couldn't even compete when there was still growth to be had, so how can it possibly compete now when the market is reaching saturation?

    I know, I know. "Niche, niche, niche." The thing about niche brands is that in the first place there has to actually be a demand for them to keep them viable, and in the second place they usually have to be high-end with high profit margins (expensive) in order to be profitable. Porsche likely has a very small worldwide share of the automobile market, but they make a premium product that people recognize and respect, and enough of them are willing to pay a premium price for it that it keeps Porsche in business.

    How many people were willing to drop $750 USD on a PRIV (even on contract it was like $300)? Obviously not nearly enough to meet Chen's sales targets. The problem is he's trying to be a premium brand when the brand image is still damaged. But he's smart enough that he recognizes this and even acknowledged the high price of the PRIV hurt sales. I have hope for their forthcoming mid-range Android devices.

    But the fact that the high end market has reached saturation means that over the next couple years we are going to see fewer and fewer $700+ smartphones in general. We'll still see them, but not nearly to the same degree we do now. Apple will keep selling iPhones at their high price points because they can, just not in the volumes they have. And that's OK for Apple because their profit margins are still high. People will buy them. Their brand image is still amazingly good. Samsung and other Android OEMs will keep making a couple hi-end smartphone models each year. But we are going to see more and more $200-$400 phones with better and better hardware. And we'll more decent low-end sub $200 offerings.

    BB10 just cannot compete in the smartphone market in such a way that it can be profitable. Maybe if BlackBerry does well with Android and is able to reestablish their good name in the smartphone market, they could reintroduce a "niche" BB10 offering. But even assuming they do everything right, rebuilding their image will take at least a couple years. Who knows what the state of the market will be then? Smartphones could be as ubiquitous as ever, or they could be going the way of tablets in favor of the "next big thing" (whatever that may be).
    04-29-16 01:06 PM
  14. Gajja's Avatar
    Stem the tide of iOS and Android.
    The other way around, according to the chart it's Android then iOS. Just saying.
    04-29-16 01:30 PM
  15. anon(6038817)'s Avatar
    The other way around, according to the chart it's Android then iOS. Just saying.
    I wasn't listing them in order of market share. They clearly are the "big 2" and have both been growing.
    Gajja likes this.
    04-29-16 01:33 PM
  16. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    The Z10 sold five million units. Heck, Thor had a profitable quarter after the Z10 launch. Much of the problem here was how the Board's consultant, John Chen, handled Thor's move to take the company private and has mismanaged the company since. I've also got to tell you that I think Mike L can make a better phone than Apple. I'm not sure that has anything to do with sales and I suspect the iPhone 7 will be awesome, but with real distinguishing benefits, you can reach 5 million phones a quarter. There are tens of millions of iPhone owners who don't login to the app store at all (because they've lost their password, think it's a hassle, don't use apps, are enterprise users, or whatever) -- there are a lot of niche users who aren't being better served by iOS/Android generics.
    1) When did Thor have a profitable quarter after the Z10 launch? I couldn't find any Earnings Report to back that up. The lose from Thor's last quarter was almont $4.4 BILLION, mostly because a large portion of the Z10 inventory cost had been written off as a loses.

    2) The Board hired Chen because there was no money or need interest to take BlackBerry private... how would the company being private improved their product?

    3) You think Mike L could make a better phone than Apple.... based on what? The STORM? The TORCH? The 9900 - probably the best BlackBerry, but still a sales disaster.

    4) We don't need apps... well where have those niche users been these last three years?
    JeepBB, mornhavon and GadgetTravel like this.
    04-29-16 01:55 PM
  17. sorinv's Avatar
    Yes, the link is about Baidu. But the Huawei part is totally related because you made it related in the post below, last sentence:



    You can't be "doubly spied on", as you put it, unless you had the app on the phone. But no worries there; the Nexus 6p doesn't come with Baidu, you'd only install it if you lived in the East - we have Google, Baidu is the search giant there. So that's out, and the phone itself can't do anything because it's just parts without software to make it all work. That software is AOSP Android, which does not call home to China or anywhere else other than Google if you allow it to, for use with Google Now and/or On Tap. And speaking of apps, if it has a purchase button, and MANY apps do, it can be purchased if so desired. So I really don't get how nor why you'd equate that with terrorism in addition to saying it's not possible. It's very possible - if I don't want ads, or if the trial period is over, I can then buy those apps if I so choose.

    And lastly, the NSA has not compromised the Linux kernel. They developed and maintain SELinux, but there are no flaws or backdoors. There's a few thousand people that would have noticed and torn the Internet asunder, including Linus Torvalds.
    And they did notice and reported it. Including Torvalds answered ambiguously when he was asked that very question.

    http://techrights.org/2013/09/20/lin...door-question/

    http://falkvinge.net/2013/11/17/nsa-...into-gnulinux/


    http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2013/11/n...ather-says-yes

    You mix a lot of things up just to confuse people, so I won't bother re-explaining it. The Citizen Lab link and BBC World service radio did a sufficiently good job for those who care to read the link and/or listen to the program.
    I have never made the link between Huawei and Baidu nor did I say that Baidu was installed on all phones or that Baidu is the only app that spies. They are independent points. You made the link.

    Now, for the unrelated Huawei discussion.
    You are clueless (or pretend to be) about how a hardware manufacturer can include software in its ICs to spy on you, without the OS on top of the hardware having control of it.
    Besides, Huawei does install its own stuff on its android phones as they do in their routers. There is a reason why US does not allow those routers in.
    Last edited by sorinv; 04-30-16 at 12:27 AM.
    04-29-16 10:52 PM
  18. sorinv's Avatar
    Doublepost
    04-30-16 12:26 AM
  19. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    And they did notice and reported it. Including Torvalds answered ambiguously when he was asked that very question.

    Linus Torvalds Dodges Question About Requests for NSA Backdoor in Linux | Techrights

    NSA Asked Linus Torvalds To Install Backdoors Into GNU/Linux - Falkvinge on Infopolicy


    NSA Wanted Backdoor Access In Linux, Says Linus Torvalds' Father - OMG! Ubuntu!

    You mix a lot of things up just to confuse people, so I won't bother re-explaining it. The Citizen Lab link and BBC World service radio did a sufficiently good job for those who care to read the link and/or listen to the program.
    I have never made the link between Huawei and Baidu nor did I say that Baidu was installed on all phones or that Baidu is the only app that spies. They are independent points. You made the link.

    Now, for the unrelated Huawei discussion.
    You are clueless (or pretend to be) about how a hardware manufacturer can include software in its ICs to spy on you, without the OS on top of the hardware having control of it.
    Besides, Huawei does install its own stuff on its android phones as they do in their routers. There is a reason why US does not allow those routers in.
    No call for insults. At all.

    Let's start with Linus. He never put a backdoor in Linux. Completely false.

    While it's totally possible to include software in hardware, that requires space and/or extra modules that apparently smart people the world over missed in several teardown videos. Here's one, please point it out for us.




    And even if it did have stowaway software, that requires connections that firewalls can easily pick up. Who's found those? No one.

    You made the link between Huawei and Baidu as I pointed out. You claimed all apps spy because we can't purchase them, and offered Baidu as an example. It's a really good example, but your statement that all apps spy and no one can purchase them is completely false.

    And where do you get the idea that Huawei routers aren't allowed in the US? Explain this order please.

    This is why BlackBerry had to go Android-amazon.png

    And this.

    This is why BlackBerry had to go Android-newegg.png

    Drop a link to that BBC show you mentioned if you would please, I want to see what that's all about.
    Last edited by Fret Madden; 04-30-16 at 01:36 PM. Reason: Updated photos
    04-30-16 01:39 AM
  20. sorinv's Avatar
    No call for insults. At all.
    Sorry. I should not have written "clueless". You obviously consider yourself an expert and I have no reason to doubt that.

    The fact that Linus did not put a backdoor in Linux does not mean that there wasn't one introduced without him being aware.
    One of the more recent ones was the shellshock one

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/09...sh_shell_vuln/

    which also affected bb10 because it used open source software.
    Open source software does not guarantee lack of backdoor.
    As far as I remember it was mentioned at the time that it had been present since the 1990's and was only discovered in 2014.


    While it's totally possible to include software in hardware, that requires space and/or extra modules that apparently smart people the world over missed in several teardown videos. Here's one, please point it out for us.


    Tearing down the hardware does not prove that software was embedded in the Integrated Circuit. To figure that one out you'd have to send the chip for a thorough investigation at Semiconductor Insights or some similar company.
    Even a scanning electron microscope (SEM) crossection is insufficient.


    And even if it did have stowaway software, that requires connections that firewalls can easily pick up. Who's found those? No one.
    How? You do not know easily what the analog transceiver or the processor does if the manufacturer does not describe that part of the functionality of the chip. They can send code without going through android or Bb10.
    Just like nobody knows what a BB10 phone sends to BlackBerry other than BlackBerry.
    Unless you claim you can break the hardware encryption. And BlackBerry doesn't even design the ICs in their phones. Huawei does! There is no way to find out from a hardware tear down.
    This is one of the reasons I have written in these forums in the past that BlackBerry cannot guarantee hardware security. They do not know what the qualcomm processor does if qualcomm hides something from them. They simply do not have the wherewithal to reverse engineer what a big qualcomm processor and baseband processor does. They don't even have money to pay for drivers, supposedly ;-)

    If you are interested, I invite you to attend the International Microwave Symposium in San Francisco in the last week of May. There will be some interesting discussion with Prof. Jan Rabaey from UC Berkeley on how the only way to ensure privacy is to embed it in hardware. Software can't do it.


    You made the link between Huawei and Baidu as I pointed out. You claimed all apps spy because we can't purchase them, and offered Baidu as an example. It's a really good example, but your statement that all apps spy and no one can purchase them is completely false.
    I said no such thing. I never talked about "purchasing" apps or "all apps", or Baidu apps installed on Huawei's Nexus. What I wrote about Huawei was totally unrelated to what I wrote about Baidu. On the contrary, what I meant was that Huawei is likely to spy through embedded code in their hardware. They may very well use apps as well, but that's not what I wrote.


    And where do you get the idea that Huawei routers aren't allowed in the US? Explain this order please.

    Attachment 398582
    Huawei does not show up in the screen shot from amazon, but assuming it is true..
    Please see below some links on why US and Australian governments have banned Huawei from bidding for government business.
    Of course businesses like Google or individuals like you can do whatever they want and order whatever from Amazon.


    On Huawei ban in Australia

    http://qz.com/140896/australias-new-...-spy-briefing/

    In US

    http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29620442



    Drop a link to that BBC show you mentioned if you would please, I want to see what that's all about.
    There isn't a link to the BBC World Service radio program discussing the Citizen Lab Baidu findings and how the five-Eyes are also using Baidu to spy on people who use those apps.
    I provided what I heard on the program in quotes.

    There is an older reference to it on the BBC World website, but the radio program which aired this week does not have a link.
    Here's the old one

    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-35669817
    Last edited by sorinv; 04-30-16 at 03:55 AM.
    04-30-16 02:41 AM
  21. sorinv's Avatar
    Unintended post
    04-30-16 03:42 AM
  22. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    Sorry I should not have written "clueless". You obviously consider yourselfan expert and I have no reason to doubt that.
    Apology accepted, and no, I'm not an expert. I am, however, well-informed.

    Tearing down the hardware does not prove if software was embedded in the Integrated Circuit. To figure that one out even an scanning electron microscope (SEM) crossection is insufficient.
    See below some links on why US and Australian governments have banned Huawei from bidding for government business.
    Of course businesses can do whatever they want. In fact, I am told that WIND in Canada uses Huawei equipment. That's one of the reasons I stopped having my second smartphone on WIND.
    How? You do not know what the analog transceiver does. Just like nobody knows what a BB10 phone sends to BlackBerry other than BlackBerry.
    Unless you claim you can break the hardware encryption. And BlackBerry doesn't even design the ICS in their phones. Huawei does!
    IC provided by Qualcomm. So unless they're altering these chips in ways that Qualcomm never envisioned, I don't think the transciever is an issue. And tracking activity can be done by packet monitoring or by noticing one's data is oddly high OR by how fast the battery drains.

    I said no such thing. I never talked about purchasing apps.
    Then I don't understand what this is:

    Try using Google or any app and select to pay instead of being spied upon. See if you can.
    The fact that Linus did not put a backdoor in Linux does not mean that there wasn't one introduced without him being aware.
    One of the more recent ones was the shellshock one

    Patch Bash NOW: 'Shellshock' bug blasts OS X, Linux systems wide open ? The Register

    Which also affected bb10 because it used open source software.
    Open source software does not guarantee lack of backdoor.
    As far as I remember it was mentioned at the time that it had been present since the 1990's and was only discovered in 2014.
    This is a totally different thing than claiming Linus Torvalds worked with the NSA to put a backdoor in Linux. Sure there's vulnerabilities, that's why there's teams constantly trying to find and fix. It's ongoing and evolutionary. It's just extremely difficult to do something in Linux that's not noticed by everyone constantly working on it. Shellshock is a good reminder to pay more attention before someone else does.

    On Huawei ban in Australia

    Australia?s new government extends Huawei ban after spy briefing ? Quartz

    In US

    Huawei boss says US ban 'not very important' - BBC News

    There isn't a link to the BBC World Service radio lprogram discussing the Citizen Lab Baidu findings and how the five-Eyes are also using Baidu to spy on people who use those apps.
    I provided what I heard on the program in quotes.

    There is an older reference to it on the BBC World website, but the radio program which aired this week does not have a link.
    Here's the old one

    Baidu apps found to be 'leaking' personal data - BBC News
    Ah, this is much more clear. America being hypocritical. Apparently it's not a complete ban here or there, the 6p is sold in both countries.
    04-30-16 04:56 AM
  23. sorinv's Avatar
    Apology accepted, and no, I'm not an expert. I am, however, well-informed.

    IC provided by Qualcomm. So unless they're altering these chips in ways that Qualcomm never envisioned, I don't think the transciever is an issue.
    Obviously, in Huawei's case not the ICs that are from Qualcomm. It does not have to be the processor or the RF transceiver.
    Somewhat unrelated, I read somewhere that one of the latest Samsung phones comes with two versions. One with a Qualcomm processor (selling in US) and one with a Samsung processor (selling outside US).

    Please do not insinuate that I wrote that Huawei puts its own code in Qualcomm's ICs or modifies them. Although, in theory TSMC could do it without Qualcomm knowing it because TSMC manufactures most of those chips, not Qualcomm.

    All I said was that Huawei designs their own ICs. BlackBerry doesn't. They used to in the early 2000 when they had an IC design team in Ottawa. Not anymore and not for many many years.

    And tracking activity can be done by packet monitoring or by noticing one's data is oddly high OR by how fast the battery drains.
    That happens all the time [battery drain] even on BB10 devices. So a regular user can't really tell from battery drain or packet data when it happens that it happens because the developer wrote bad code, or the phone manufacturer is doing something, or if it is doing it on purpose.

    Besides, not everybody has to be monitored all the time for a long time.
    Afterall, data mining occurs most of the time but for very brief periods.



    These things have been reported in the citizen Lab link and BBC Radio program. My job is not to sniff out spies on the internet. I am merely reporting what I read or heard. By now you should have figured out that I am not manufacturing these incidents.


    This is a totally different thing than claiming Linus Torvalds worked with the NSA to put a backdoor in Linux. Sure there's vulnerabilities, that's why there's teams constantly trying to find and fix. It's ongoing and evolutionary. It's just extremely difficult to do something in Linux that's not noticed by everyone constantly working on it. Shellshock is a good reminder to pay more attention before someone else does.
    I absolutely never said that Linus worked with the NSA. Please go back and read my first post. What I stated was that the NSA has/had agents among the Linux volunteers introducing vulnerabilities and/or ignoring and not reporting them when they identify them. Again, this is well documented.

    I merely mentioned the incident that Linus did not deny that the NSA asked him to collaborate. That does not mean that he accepted to collaborate. It means that he confirmed that he was asked.

    What it confirms is that NSA wanted to do it.

    Again, this has been very well documented by a large number of credible media outlets, like BBC, NYT, the Guardian, CBC, ABC Australia, etc.

    Ah, this is much more clear. America being hypocritical. Apparently it's not a complete ban here or there, the 6p is sold in both countries.
    I only wrote that Huawei routers were banned by US and Australian governments, not that nexus 6p was banned from being sold to the public in US or Australia. I know that much.

    Anyway, I think I have spent enough energy on this. You are just picking straws and rewriting my sentences trying to confuse the issue. Your also posted a picture that had nothing to do with Huawei and no links to refute the links and issues I pointed to.
    Obviously what you are doing is important or you wouldn't spend so many posts trying to re-write my sentences.
    Cheers.
    Last edited by sorinv; 04-30-16 at 10:50 AM.
    04-30-16 10:11 AM
  24. TheAuthority's Avatar
    ...I agree that the visualization shows that BlackBerry 10 is not competing in the overall smartphone market, but it's entirely possible for BlackBerry to succeed as a niche, low volume handset provider if they have their own platform with strong differentation...

    ...I'm not sure that has anything to do with sales and I suspect the iPhone 7 will be awesome, but with real distinguishing benefits, you can reach 5 million phones a quarter. There are tens of millions of iPhone owners who don't login to the app store at all (because they've lost their password, think it's a hassle, don't use apps, are enterprise users, or whatever) -- there are a lot of niche users who aren't being better served by iOS/Android generics.
    I agree that BlackBerry absolutely can succeed as a niche, low volume handset provider with BlackBerry 10. People who criticize the niche and say that there is no niche are wrong. There are still millions of BlackBerry users. Thar's a niche.

    I was reading an article on TheGuardian this morning about Icahn selling all his apple shares and came across this in the article's comments that expresses what's happening in the smartphone market:

    "Let's face it. The ONLY thing that would entice MOST of us to upgrade an Iphone5 or 6 would be a 7 with a LARGER BATTERY. Like laptops, smartphones have run out of steam --- features and capabilities above their predecessors that justify an additional $700 investment. Put a new battery in a 5 or 6 every two years and until you break it or wear out the home button, you're good to go. Apple's stock has nowhere to go but down from it's insane peak. Icahn just happens to be in a position to act on this reality unlike the rest of us."

    So, what is this "development" that the enthusiastic "BlackBerry 10 is dead" posters think BlackBerry 10 users will miss out on even if BlackBerry a) does not issue any new BlackBerry 10 models for the next two years and b) issues only security updates in the next two years with no new development? My BlackBerry 10 phone already does browsing, email, messaging, voice, and video calling. What am I supposedly missing out on? Games? Facebook's Whatsapp? A dedicated facebook app? I don't care about any of those, and my BlackBerry 10 smartphone still does everything else I need it to do.

    https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...stake-in-apple
    04-30-16 10:18 AM
  25. TheAuthority's Avatar
    That happens all the time [battery drain] even on BB10 devices. So you can't really tell from battery drain or packet data when it happens that it happens because the developer wrote bad code, or the phone manufacturer is doing something, or if it is doing it on purpose.
    Though I'm with you on many points, I wanted to stress that the only times I ever see battery drain on my BlackBerry10 handset are in low signal strength areas and when android Skype pegs and spies or does whatever else it does e.g. runs poorly, etc. Thus far those have been the only battery drain culprits. (That's not to say that BlackBerry couldn't flip a switch and drain my battery by doing something in the background if it chose to.)
    04-30-16 10:24 AM
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