07-23-11 06:34 AM
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  1. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    (Reuters) - Tablets using Microsoft Corp software saw stronger sales than the high-profile Playbook from BlackBerry maker Research In Motion in the second quarter, according to Strategy Analytics.

    Even though Microsoft has yet to launch a version of its Windows software designed specifically for tablet computers it still picked up a 4.6 percent share of the market in the second quarter compared with a 3.3 percent share for Playbook, which is based on RIM's QNX software.

    RIM launched Playbook, its first tablet computer, in April to lackluster reviews. Microsoft, which provides the same software for tablets as it sells to desktop computer makers, is not expected to launch dedicated tablet software until the late next year.

    Meanwhile market leader Apple Inc fought off an increasingly strong challenge from Google Inc, whose Android software is used in tablets from many hardware vendors including Samsung Electronics Co and Motorola Mobility.

    Apple's iPad tablet dominated the market with a 61.3 percent share. But Android increased its market share to 30 percent from 2.9 percent in the same quarter a year ago, when Apple had 94.3 percent of the market, the technology research firm, Strategy Analytics said.

    (Reporting by Sinead Carew; editing by Carol Bishopri
    Tablets using Microsoft software top RIM's touted Playbook | Reuters
    07-21-11 02:28 AM
  2. chuckh0308's Avatar
    The way I see it...

    The PlayBook, while nice, is kind of stuck in a bad position. A truly professional tablet requires Windows or Mac OS (if Apple would do it...I'm waiting...), while the consumer tablet market is well covered by iOS and Android tablets. This leaves RIM stuck in the middle with a tablet that doesn't really fit at either end, mostly because of poor marketing. Basically, RIM is marketing it as a professional tablet, but it really isn't, and I'm not sure it ever could be. Not in it's current hardware and software form anyway. It's a consumer tablet, pure and simple and it's up against the almighty iPad and a HUGE assortment of Android tablets. Apple is probably the only company in a position to release a tablet right now that fully crosses into both categories. Basically, a MacBook Air in a tablet version. Doesn't look like they are going to do it though, unfortunately...

    It will be interesting to see where Microsnot goes with the tablets. If they can create Windows for tablets that retains all the driver capabilities and software support of PC Windows while integrating proper touch UI and functions, they may have something good.

    RIM needs to step up the game with the PB and market it correctly if they want to be major player.
    07-21-11 03:14 AM
  3. Rootbrian's Avatar
    Windows is a malware magnet when internet explorer is used. The casual browser who isn't websavvy will surely, mess up that windows-powered tablet.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-21-11 06:03 AM
  4. lnichols's Avatar
    The way I see it...

    The PlayBook, while nice, is kind of stuck in a bad position. A truly professional tablet requires Windows or Mac OS (if Apple would do it...I'm waiting...), while the consumer tablet market is well covered by iOS and Android tablets. This leaves RIM stuck in the middle with a tablet that doesn't really fit at either end, mostly because of poor marketing. Basically, RIM is marketing it as a professional tablet, but it really isn't, and I'm not sure it ever could be. Not in it's current hardware and software form anyway. It's a consumer tablet, pure and simple and it's up against the almighty iPad and a HUGE assortment of Android tablets. Apple is probably the only company in a position to release a tablet right now that fully crosses into both categories. Basically, a MacBook Air in a tablet version. Doesn't look like they are going to do it though, unfortunately...

    It will be interesting to see where Microsnot goes with the tablets. If they can create Windows for tablets that retains all the driver capabilities and software support of PC Windows while integrating proper touch UI and functions, they may have something good.

    RIM needs to step up the game with the PB and market it correctly if they want to be major player.
    I don't think running OS's that aren't designed for tablets on tablets is better. The things that are hurting RIM with the Playbook right now are:

    - Horrible press coverage and constant beatings in the media (some of it is warranted, but it is over the top)
    - Lack of ability to get corporate mail (or personal) without a Blackberry. I know why they did the bridge and they are the only tablet that can view PIM information securely now, but it requires a BB phone which apparently is a turn off probably to a lot of people.
    - Lack of good VPN or BES capability to access corporate networks securely.
    - Lack of remote management and policy enforcement via BES.
    - Lack of Professional grade apps (or apps anyway). They brought up these companies running apps for the announcements, where are they.

    What I think could make Playbook take off:
    - Release native e-mail and the ability to integrate with a BES.
    - Offer both the 7" and a larger form factor to cover both sides of the market.
    - Release an Office suite, preferably MS Office, for Playbook with full Outlook client.
    - Get Cisco, Juniper and Avaya VPN clients out for the Playbook
    - Get Citrix, Skype, Kindle, Android App Player, etc out.

    Right now they have the best hardware and OS on the market, and you can't do all that much with it other than media consumption. That said I love mine and use it a lot, but know that if RIM doesn't get their act together they won't be selling many of these.
    07-21-11 06:05 AM
  5. JasW's Avatar
    I don't think running OS's that aren't designed for tablets on tablets is better.
    But that's the thing -- the MS software will be designed for tablets, according to the article.

    I use a netbook, and have no use for the PlayBook save for something along the lines of a novelty item. I need the netbook running Windows primarily because I can run MS Word on it, Citrix, which allows me to connect to work apps, etc. (Plus a netbook gives me a physical keyboard.) I would be extremely interested in a tablet with Windows for these reasons, particularly -- and perhaps only -- if it were one of these Asus-style tablets that allowed one to buy a separate keyboard/docking station for another $150 or so.
    07-21-11 08:13 AM
  6. ADGrant's Avatar
    Windows is a malware magnet when internet explorer is used. The casual browser who isn't websavvy will surely, mess up that windows-powered tablet.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Some would say that Windows is Malware.
    07-21-11 09:41 AM
  7. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I don't think running OS's that aren't designed for tablets on tablets is better.
    The problem is that new tablets are hitting the shelves constantly, and Microsoft will soon be offering tablets running an OS specifically designed for tablets.

    What I think could make Playbook take off:
    - Release native e-mail and the ability to integrate with a BES.
    - Offer both the 7" and a larger form factor to cover both sides of the market.
    - Release an Office suite, preferably MS Office, for Playbook with full Outlook client.
    - Get Cisco, Juniper and Avaya VPN clients out for the Playbook
    - Get Citrix, Skype, Kindle, Android App Player, etc out.

    Right now they have the best hardware and OS on the market, and you can't do all that much with it other than media consumption. That said I love mine and use it a lot, but know that if RIM doesn't get their act together they won't be selling many of these.
    All of those features would help the Playbook sell. However, it will quickly become a forgotten has-been in the tablet market if RIM continues to delay any meaningful OS upgrades to add these features.
    07-21-11 10:16 AM
  8. flyersfan76's Avatar
    Windows has been running on Tablets for a very long time. In fact it is called XP Tablet edition.

    http://www.motioncomputing.com/
    http://www.tabletkiosk.com/

    Man it is like people think Apple invented the tablet.
    Last edited by flyersfan76; 07-21-11 at 11:47 AM.
    07-21-11 11:36 AM
  9. flyersfan76's Avatar
    The way I see it...

    The PlayBook, while nice, is kind of stuck in a bad position. A truly professional tablet requires Windows or Mac OS (if Apple would do it...I'm waiting...), while the consumer tablet market is well covered by iOS and Android tablets. This leaves RIM stuck in the middle with a tablet that doesn't really fit at either end, mostly because of poor marketing. Basically, RIM is marketing it as a professional tablet, but it really isn't, and I'm not sure it ever could be. Not in it's current hardware and software form anyway. It's a consumer tablet, pure and simple and it's up against the almighty iPad and a HUGE assortment of Android tablets. Apple is probably the only company in a position to release a tablet right now that fully crosses into both categories. Basically, a MacBook Air in a tablet version. Doesn't look like they are going to do it though, unfortunately...

    It will be interesting to see where Microsnot goes with the tablets. If they can create Windows for tablets that retains all the driver capabilities and software support of PC Windows while integrating proper touch UI and functions, they may have something good.

    RIM needs to step up the game with the PB and market it correctly if they want to be major player.
    There was a rumor that Apple was going to build an actual tablet. Then they announced the iPad. The media forgot all about that OSX powered tablet the next day.

    And Microsoft did create what you are describing BUT the business market buys them. That is what hospitals are using. Not iPads.
    Last edited by flyersfan76; 07-27-11 at 08:32 AM.
    07-21-11 11:38 AM
  10. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Windows has been running on Tablets for a very long time. In fact it is called XP Tablet edition.

    Tablet PC Products, Services and Mobile Computing Solutions
    Tablet PC, Ultra-Mobile PC (UMPC) and Mobile Clinical Assistant (MCA) Systems, Peripherals and Accessories by TabletKiosk

    Man it is like people think Apple invented the tablet.
    Microsoft's History With the Tablet PC | PCWorld
    07-21-11 11:42 AM
  11. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Windows has been running on Tablets for a very long time. In fact it is called XP Tablet edition.

    Tablet PC Products, Services and Mobile Computing Solutions
    Tablet PC, Ultra-Mobile PC (UMPC) and Mobile Clinical Assistant (MCA) Systems, Peripherals and Accessories by TabletKiosk

    Man it is like people think Apple invented the tablet.
    I know somebody who was at this trade show and saw Gates give the keynote speech.
    07-21-11 11:47 AM
  12. Economist101's Avatar
    Man it is like people think Apple invented the tablet.
    No one cares who invented a product that wasn't successful. Microsoft has no excuse for its failure to execute its tablet strategy from 2003.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-21-11 01:58 PM
  13. bquinney's Avatar
    I'm thinking that, based on the cryptographic kernel receiving certification recently (today/yesterday), this could have been anticipated by management & executives at more companies than just RIM. According to the Citrix blog dated May 25,a response by a (supposed) employee responded as to the availability of the Receiver for Playbook as "by the close of Q3 / end of September" and "possible it will ship earlier".

    Citrix Receiver Supporting 1,000,000,000+ Devices and Counting | Citrix Blogs


    It's possible that other vendors were in line with this same timeframe to have their product properly tested and released.
    07-21-11 02:06 PM
  14. Dapper37's Avatar
    PRESS RELEASE: BlackBerry PlayBook Becomes First Tablet Certified for U.S. Government

    14:30 EST Thursday, Jul 21, 2011

    **Advertisement


    Hide advertisment

    BlackBerry PlayBook Wins 'Best in Show' Award at FOSE 2011

    WATERLOO, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - July 21, 2011) - Research In Motion (RIM) (NASDAQ:RIMM)(TSX:RIM) announced today that it has received FIPS 140-2 certification for the new BlackBerry(R) PlayBook(TM) tablet, making the BlackBerry PlayBook the first tablet certified for deployment within U.S. federal government agencies. No other tablet on the market has gained FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) certification from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which is required under the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA).

    "RIM is pleased to announce that the BlackBerry PlayBook is the first tablet approved under FIPS for use within the U.S. federal government," said Scott Totzke, Senior Vice President, BlackBerry Security at Research In Motion. "This certification demonstrates our continued commitment to meeting the needs of security-conscious organizations and enables the U.S. federal government to buy with confidence knowing that the PlayBook meets their computing policy requirements for protecting sensitive information."

    BlackBerry PlayBook is a powerful, ultra-portable tablet that fits comfortably in one hand. It has a stunning 7-inch high resolution display, offers true multi-tasking capabilities and a high-fidelity web experience. It also allows for secure pairing with BlackBerry(R) smartphones via the BlackBerry(R) Bridge(TM) app, which enables users to access their BlackBerry smartphone's email, calendar, address book, memo pad, task list, BBM (BlackBerry(R) Messenger) and browsing functionality using the larger display on the tablet.

    The FIPS-certified BlackBerry PlayBook tablet is being showcased this week in Washington DC at FOSE - the largest Federal government information technology conference in the U.S. - where BlackBerry PlayBook has just been awarded Best in Show, and also Best of FOSE in the Handheld Devices category.
    07-21-11 02:07 PM
  15. flyersfan76's Avatar
    No one cares who invented a product that wasn't successful. Microsoft has no excuse for its failure to execute its tablet strategy from 2003.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Seems pretty successful in hospitals. **** Verizon wireless stores use them now.

    Damn it. I didn't realize who posted the above until after I hit submit. Sorry for feeding the troll.
    07-21-11 02:54 PM
  16. flyersfan76's Avatar
    PRESS RELEASE: BlackBerry PlayBook Becomes First Tablet Certified for U.S. Government

    14:30 EST Thursday, Jul 21, 2011

    **Advertisement


    Hide advertisment

    BlackBerry PlayBook Wins 'Best in Show' Award at FOSE 2011

    WATERLOO, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - July 21, 2011) - Research In Motion (RIM) (NASDAQ:RIMM)(TSX:RIM) announced today that it has received FIPS 140-2 certification for the new BlackBerry(R) PlayBook(TM) tablet, making the BlackBerry PlayBook the first tablet certified for deployment within U.S. federal government agencies. No other tablet on the market has gained FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) certification from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which is required under the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA).

    "RIM is pleased to announce that the BlackBerry PlayBook is the first tablet approved under FIPS for use within the U.S. federal government," said Scott Totzke, Senior Vice President, BlackBerry Security at Research In Motion. "This certification demonstrates our continued commitment to meeting the needs of security-conscious organizations and enables the U.S. federal government to buy with confidence knowing that the PlayBook meets their computing policy requirements for protecting sensitive information."

    BlackBerry PlayBook is a powerful, ultra-portable tablet that fits comfortably in one hand. It has a stunning 7-inch high resolution display, offers true multi-tasking capabilities and a high-fidelity web experience. It also allows for secure pairing with BlackBerry(R) smartphones via the BlackBerry(R) Bridge(TM) app, which enables users to access their BlackBerry smartphone's email, calendar, address book, memo pad, task list, BBM (BlackBerry(R) Messenger) and browsing functionality using the larger display on the tablet.

    The FIPS-certified BlackBerry PlayBook tablet is being showcased this week in Washington DC at FOSE - the largest Federal government information technology conference in the U.S. - where BlackBerry PlayBook has just been awarded Best in Show, and also Best of FOSE in the Handheld Devices category.
    What does this actually mean? I have seen other tablets that are marketed towards government but what does the FIPS mean? Or this only pretaining to the "new" style tablets that are not running full OS's. Serious question.
    07-21-11 03:16 PM
  17. m23haz's Avatar
    What does this actually mean? I have seen other tablets that are marketed towards government but what does the FIPS mean? Or this only pretaining to the "new" style tablets that are not running full OS's. Serious question.
    It means they have a government security certification that Apple and Android don't have still CX said in another thread that Apple has been trying to get this cert clearance on their OS since 2008 and its still not cleared.

    This is why the government and the business world use BlackBerry in the first place. Their security features are 2nd to none.

    I think ultimately this will be a blessing for RIM and the PlayBook. I think if the government and military decide to purchase a lot of them it will jump start more QNX development and it will be up and running!
    07-21-11 03:27 PM
  18. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I hope I'm wrong, since I do like BlackBerry. However, I see their products becoming useful for only a niche market, such as government, and becoming irrelevant to the average consumer. Government security clearances mean nothing to someone purchasing a personal device. Apple, Android, Microsoft, and the other companies do not produce products strictly for business or with government security clearances.
    07-21-11 03:38 PM
  19. flyersfan76's Avatar
    It means they have a government security certification that Apple and Android don't have still CX said in another thread that Apple has been trying to get this cert clearance on their OS since 2008 and its still not cleared.

    This is why the government and the business world use BlackBerry in the first place. Their security features are 2nd to none.

    I think ultimately this will be a blessing for RIM and the PlayBook. I think if the government and military decide to purchase a lot of them it will jump start more QNX development and it will be up and running!
    My point was there are other tablets on the market that do not run Android, Apple or RIM. I.E. this thread is about a tablet that not many consumer know exist.
    07-21-11 03:41 PM
  20. lnichols's Avatar
    How long have Windows Tablets been available? At least 4 years that I know of. And have you seen what they consider a tablet? Its a PC with a swivel touchscreen if they are abiding by the older definition.
    07-21-11 03:48 PM
  21. flyersfan76's Avatar
    How long have Windows Tablets been available? At least 4 years that I know of. And have you seen what they consider a tablet? Its a PC with a swivel touchscreen if they are abiding by the older definition.
    At least 4 years and No they are not swivel screens.

    In fact the newest one that I almost bought is the size of the Playbook but maybe just a little thicker.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    07-21-11 03:51 PM
  22. gord888's Avatar
    Maybe MS or RIM will create an installer too get Windows running on the PB? How hard can it be?
    07-21-11 09:11 PM
  23. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Maybe MS or RIM will create an installer too get Windows running on the PB? How hard can it be?
    I do not see that happening unless Microsoft buys RIM, since I do not think RIM would accept it.

    There already is a tablet from Viewsonic, the ViewPad 10, which runs both Windows and Android.
    Last edited by lak611; 07-21-11 at 09:53 PM.
    07-21-11 09:13 PM
  24. Dapper37's Avatar
    I think the life just got sucked out of the little story..
    07-21-11 09:28 PM
  25. the_sleuth's Avatar
    Confucius says:

    "Lack of patience, even on small issues, can ruin a sound plan. No patience on small matters can mess up a big job."

    I don't think running OS's that aren't designed for tablets on tablets is better. The things that are hurting RIM with the Playbook right now are:

    - Horrible press coverage and constant beatings in the media (some of it is warranted, but it is over the top)
    - Lack of ability to get corporate mail (or personal) without a Blackberry. I know why they did the bridge and they are the only tablet that can view PIM information securely now, but it requires a BB phone which apparently is a turn off probably to a lot of people.
    - Lack of good VPN or BES capability to access corporate networks securely.
    - Lack of remote management and policy enforcement via BES.
    - Lack of Professional grade apps (or apps anyway). They brought up these companies running apps for the announcements, where are they.

    What I think could make Playbook take off:
    - Release native e-mail and the ability to integrate with a BES.
    - Offer both the 7" and a larger form factor to cover both sides of the market.
    - Release an Office suite, preferably MS Office, for Playbook with full Outlook client.
    - Get Cisco, Juniper and Avaya VPN clients out for the Playbook
    - Get Citrix, Skype, Kindle, Android App Player, etc out.

    Right now they have the best hardware and OS on the market, and you can't do all that much with it other than media consumption. That said I love mine and use it a lot, but know that if RIM doesn't get their act together they won't be selling many of these.
    07-21-11 10:01 PM
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