03-14-17 04:44 AM
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  1. bobshine's Avatar
    Security is relative to your need. For one person, a landline is secure since no one will go into the hassle of tapping his or her phone since there is nothing valuable to listen to.

    For another, you need an encrypted and locked down phone.

    OP it's possible that for your employer, the iphone is more secure than blackberry. How? Well I don't know where you work but I work in a financial institution. For years, BB was the golden standard with all banking work apps available on it. Today, those apps haven't been updated for years, or isn't just available. But they are up to date on iOS. That's one of the most important aspect of security
    Tien-Lin Chang and early2bed like this.
    12-30-16 12:19 AM
  2. cribble2k's Avatar
    Define "legitimately". If you disqualify Dingleberry because it wasn't an official BlackBerry tool then every CVE on Android and iOS is similarly out the window since Google and Apple consider them bugs, not features.

    Attachment 415019
    You know what I find ironic?

    BlackBerry claims to have the most secure Android devices, yet every BlackBerry Android device would be susceptible to the same CVEs as the other Android devices.

    We heard claims by BlackBerry about how they can fix exploits, and send fixes to their devices directly, but they never have. Not all Priv / DTEK 50/60 are on the December security patch, and BlackBerry is sure not going out of their way to patch CVE issues on their Android devices.

    But it's secure because it can't be rooted! The average Android user does not root, thus the bootloader stays locked.
    Tien-Lin Chang and shaleem like this.
    12-30-16 12:35 AM
  3. StephanieMaks's Avatar
    Apple has also cooperated with Law Enforcement. They do so regularly the San Bernadino thing was for show.

    Posted via CB10
    Well, actually...

    Apple cooperates with legal law enforcement requests. The San Bernadino thing was in their lawyers' opinion an unlawful request.

    They weren't being asked to crack one iPhone, they were asking Apple to build a tool that could bypass iPhone security and crack lots of iPhones.

    It seems to be a subtle difference lost on many Crackberrians.

    The difference is, complying with legal properly executed requests while denying those that are unlawful and/or too over-reaching; compared with just bending over and handing customer data over to anyone in a uniform who happens to ask for it under any situation. Which is what Chen seemed to imply he does or would do.
    12-30-16 06:20 AM
  4. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    Zero and zero.
    What are you basing that on?

    Blind faith?
    Yes, exactly that.
    12-30-16 08:07 AM
  5. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    Well, actually...

    Apple cooperates with legal law enforcement requests. The San Bernadino thing was in their lawyers' opinion an unlawful request.

    They weren't being asked to crack one iPhone, they were asking Apple to build a tool that could bypass iPhone security and crack lots of iPhones.

    It seems to be a subtle difference lost on many Crackberrians.
    It's not even a subtle difference. Doesn't stop it from getting lost, though.
    12-30-16 08:10 AM
  6. z10Jobe's Avatar
    Well, actually...

    Apple cooperates with legal law enforcement requests. The San Bernadino thing was in their lawyers' opinion an unlawful request.

    They weren't being asked to crack one iPhone, they were asking Apple to build a tool that could bypass iPhone security and crack lots of iPhones.

    It seems to be a subtle difference lost on many Crackberrians.

    The difference is, complying with legal properly executed requests while denying those that are unlawful and/or too over-reaching; compared with just bending over and handing customer data over to anyone in a uniform who happens to ask for it under any situation. Which is what Chen seemed to imply he does or would do.
    Well actually.....

    Apple does not co-operate when it comes to tax law requests..... but that is not part of this thread.

    Posted via CB10
    12-30-16 09:31 AM
  7. Linto988's Avatar
    12-31-16 09:16 AM
  8. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    All that proves is that nobody cares enough to try to hack into Blackberry phones anymore.
    Tien-Lin Chang likes this.
    12-31-16 09:42 AM
  9. Linto988's Avatar
    All that proves is that nobody cares enough to try to hack into Blackberry phones anymore.
    And that doesn't mean Apple is secure than BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    12-31-16 10:32 AM
  10. TCB on Z10's Avatar
    All that proves is that nobody cares enough to try to hack into Blackberry phones anymore.
    Because only people like Clinton use them

    BB, Still the One
    12-31-16 10:50 AM
  11. neoberry99's Avatar
    Yeah, I guess.

    Even the best-supported claims are met with this:

    Lol... You're nuts.
    12-31-16 12:04 PM
  12. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Because only people like Clinton use them

    BB, Still the One
    ... and get in trouble...? ;-)

    •   10.3.3 - that's the go for me... ;-D   •
    12-31-16 03:51 PM
  13. stlabrat's Avatar
    PURE BS. IT people hate anything to do with the hardware of a computer. A printer even more! IT people don't like to go onsite. IT people want to warm a comfortable chair and do as little as possible!

    Sent from one of my SE Passports using BB10 superior software.
    lets be fair: before y2k, some of the IT people were amazing (more than 50%). knew a lot of both hardware and software, the Y2K event diluted the pool to 10%, with many so called IT fresh out of few month training school with limited knowledge. That situation corrected somewhat in the 2009 downturn, but not eliminated (at least the true IT support still less than 30%, with many company contracted out their dept to the lowest bidder, even remote site... hardware knowledge is far inferior than on site support... ). It is not IT chaps become lazy, it is the business chaps are too greedy. IT is like QA background design engineer, if you are really good at what you do, you will have little or no follow on work of the project (less patch holes for security or automatic reset reboot the system after power outage - for example). The bean counter most likely not appreciate the value of your work...that resulted less capable chaps in the pool... Know few great IT chaps went to do the Hotel support next to the blue sea, maintaining wifi network after got canned by bean counters, because they were so good that Co didn't see the need for keep their position... (until next upgrade, everything fall apart... ). Guess what, software is follow the IT road now: many code schools get out batch of students that know little every few month, just like Y2K - as the same, the students know little about hardware, scary for the future network and mobile system. God protect us all.
    12-31-16 07:08 PM
  14. JohnKCG's Avatar
    I Know that maybe this is unrelated to IOS's own security overall, but if it is more secure than blackberry why you can Jailbreak in IOS?

    Posted via CB10
    01-01-17 08:15 AM
  15. bobshine's Avatar
    I Know that maybe this is unrelated to IOS's own security overall, but if it is more secure than blackberry why you can Jailbreak in IOS?

    Posted via CB10
    Jailbreaking has nothing to do with security! Why are people fixated on this???

    First, jail broken device are not allowed on most networks. They are detected and kicked out.

    Second, you cannot jailbreak a device remotely.

    Third, the definition of security is different for everyone. For IT departments, its securing the content of the phone. It means encryption, password lock, remote wipe.
    TgeekB, early2bed, shaleem and 1 others like this.
    01-01-17 08:52 AM
  16. shaleem's Avatar
    Ah yes .... the never ending argument.
    01-01-17 10:56 AM
  17. Slash82's Avatar
    It really depends what you see as "security"?
    - Privacy of the OS itself?
    - Privacy when it comes what apps have access to?
    - maleware?
    - viruses?
    - encryption?
    - encrypted texting?
    - cloud solutions?
    - giving metadata to governments?
    - trading user's data?
    etc. many more....

    Each of this point can be discussed over hours.

    Apple's iPhone is a pretty secure device itself.
    But just with installing a single app like Facebook - your whole privacy is gone, doesn't matter how secure iOS itself is.

    There is no "one and only" solution - the user itself might be the biggest "security risk".



    Posted via CB10
    01-01-17 11:27 AM
  18. thurask's Avatar
    There is no "one and only" solution - the user itself might be the biggest "security risk".
    I have a feeling there's at least one person who seriously believes "I don't need a good password/2FA/whatever because I have a BlackBerry".
    01-01-17 12:10 PM
  19. Slash82's Avatar
    I have a feeling there's at least one person who seriously believes "I don't need a good password/2FA/whatever because I have a BlackBerry".
    "best" and "most secure" devices ain't nothing when the users just relies on that device.
    There are way too many un-secure passwords in use.
    01-01-17 03:36 PM
  20. thurask's Avatar
    "best" and "most secure" devices ain't nothing when the users just relies on that device.
    There are way too many un-secure passwords in use.
    "But it's got a hypervisor/microkernel! How could it not be so secure that I can just use the password I always use!"
    01-01-17 04:18 PM
  21. Slash82's Avatar
    "But it's got a hypervisor/microkernel! How could it not be so secure that I can just use the password I always use!"
    Well then.

    Posted via CB10
    01-01-17 04:45 PM
  22. StephanieMaks's Avatar
    "best" and "most secure" devices ain't nothing when the users just relies on that device.
    There are way too many un-secure passwords in use.
    I remember a friend once told me she lost her Q10 and was worried because it had sensitive information on it. I told her it should be fine, it's a BlackBerry, as long as her password wasn't easy to guess nobody would get into her phone.

    Her response was "... password?"



    (Fortunately the phone was found and returned to her.)
    Slash82 and Superdupont 2_0 like this.
    01-01-17 05:18 PM
  23. Slash82's Avatar
    I remember a friend once told me she lost her Q10 and was worried because it had sensitive information on it. I told her it should be fine, it's a BlackBerry, as long as her password wasn't easy to guess nobody would get into her phone.

    Her response was "... password?"



    (Fortunately the phone was found and returned to her.)
    Luckily she got it back.

    I always run my devices fully encrypted, also picture password is pretty great to have!
    Way easier than remembering a huge password/phrase.

    Also password keeper is great to improve the security - when people don't want to remember those long phrases.

    Posted via CB10
    01-01-17 05:24 PM
  24. mkelley65's Avatar
    PURE BS. IT people hate anything to do with the hardware of a computer. A printer even more! IT people don't like to go onsite. IT people want to warm a comfortable chair and do as little as possible!

    Sent from one of my SE Passports using BB10 superior software.
    You are confusing a help desk drone with an IT Person.
    01-01-17 05:26 PM
  25. axeman1000's Avatar
    Tell him to go jailbreak his iPhone while you go and alter the OS of your BlackBerry......Oh wait. You can't cause it's too secure to do something like jailbreak it!!!

    Point.....match...win BlackBerry. Nuff said.

    Posted via CB10
    01-01-17 05:47 PM
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