1. Mister-E's Avatar
    There has been lots of debate if RIM should have gone the Android route, and there were many valid reasons not to (and ones that they should). An alternate course of action was to release an alternate brand of phones that were Android only. Car manufacturers have several brands of cars, for example, GM has Opel, Buick and Cadillac. GM markets these vehicles to different market segments. The Android brand would have been marketed to the consumer market, while the Blackberry phones would continue to be marketed to government and business. When RIM bought QNX they must have realized the massive undertaking to build a phone on this OS, and with no guarantee of success. This is why Samsung and HTC are having it easy, they did not have to develop their own OS. The RIM Android would benefit from synergies with Blackberry, specifically BBM. This would have resulted attracting anyone leaving Blackberry to adopt the RIM Android and to attract the consumer market. When RIM finally worked out the QNX OS phone they would release it as a Blackberry.
    06-28-12 09:14 PM
  2. Majestic Lion's Avatar
    Oh, really.
    06-28-12 09:30 PM
  3. Mr.Willie's Avatar
    But then it would be just another Android device in an already flooded market. Remember, only Samsung is making any real profit (other than Google) from the sales of Android handsets.

    I don't know what the hold up is on BB10, but I feel that RIM needs to do what Apple does and release it. Tell the people this is what it does, not make any promises, and then methodically release killer updates.
    06-29-12 06:01 AM
  4. Mister-E's Avatar
    But then it would be just another Android device in an already flooded market. Remember, only Samsung is making any real profit (other than Google) from the sales of Android handsets.

    I don't know what the hold up is on BB10, but I feel that RIM needs to do what Apple does and release it. Tell the people this is what it does, not make any promises, and then methodically release killer updates.
    True it is a flooded Android market, but BBM would be a competitive advantage and would differentiate itself from the other Android devices. My argument is more looking at things if RIM had done this two years ago to stop the defection of Blackberry users to Androd or iPhone. I don't follow Android too closely but I am guessing that HTC's problem was that their devices were not compelling, however it looks like the HTC One X is changing that.

    I too am curious about the hold up. I would think that with the work already done on the Playbook they would have an existing foundation to build on. I too would go for them releasing it sooner then updating it, but the problem is the media would destroy it for all it's short comings. Plus I would wait if it was buggy.
    06-29-12 07:29 AM
  5. brucep1's Avatar
    I'll always wonder what would have happened if they went to Android. I am completely clueless, really.
    06-29-12 07:38 AM
  6. Splange's Avatar
    But then it would be just another Android device in an already flooded market. Remember, only Samsung is making any real profit (other than Google) from the sales of Android handsets.



    I don't know what the hold up is on BB10, but I feel that RIM needs to do what Apple does and release it. Tell the people this is what it does, not make any promises, and then methodically release killer updates.

    We've heard that before, but it's not really a fair argument. RIM had a reputation for building quality smartphones that the other android OEM's did not. It has bbm and data compression - features that would have differentiated it from other android devices. There's no reason to think that RIM would have become LG rather than Samsung.
    Even HTC, which isn't doing as well as Samsung, looks to be in a better position than RIM right now.

    This BB10 delay is proving what others have said for a while now, building an OS from scratch is not a viable option. RIM should have made a line of Android devices to please consumers while keeping bb7 phones for those who want security.



    Sent from my BlackBerry 9700 using Tapatalk
    06-29-12 07:56 AM
  7. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Google doesn't even make *direct* profit from Android. I thought I read someweher that they make residual cash from app sales, but that wouldn't even cover R&D IMHO.

    There was a time I would have said an emphatic no to the suggestion, based on the JAAD argument. But, if RIM did make a high-end, QWERTY Android device, you might have some takers. It would have to be a high end device...

    BUT...

    How would Android OS work with the NOC and other infrastructure in place? I don't know. How would the inevitable RIM skin work? It would be a locked down device (Samsung has succeeded, so I assume RIM would too).

    It is a free OS, it allows RIM to put out an interim product and takes care of ecosystem issues. Alas, as noted, I have no idea as to how the technical side would work.
    06-29-12 09:19 AM
  8. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    If this is a "wait an see" move, there's no single chance they'll get a dime with it. Unless they manufacture naked devices, which seems very unlikely. If they go Android as main OS, they die in a breathe (and it would take years to even approach their security level).
    06-29-12 09:28 AM
  9. Splange's Avatar
    If this is a "wait an see" move, there's no single chance they'll get a dime with it. Unless they manufacture naked devices, which seems very unlikely. If they go Android as main OS, they die in a breathe (and it would take years to even approach their security level).

    Hence the two lines approach. The regular bbos phones could do security while the android bb line catches up.

    Still, it's too late for any of this now. We're just playing coulda-been at this point.

    Sent from my BlackBerry 9700 using Tapatalk
    06-29-12 09:32 AM
  10. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    If this is a "wait an see" move, there's no single chance they'll get a dime with it. Unless they manufacture naked devices, which seems very unlikely. If they go Android as main OS, they die in a breathe (and it would take years to even approach their security level).
    Sammy sells locked up Android devices and tablets. There is a branch of the military that is making it's own skinned and ultra-locked down version of Android GB, IIRC. There is literally an Android OS that fits most people's needs (if one likes the OS).

    Point being, Android has not even had to "approach their security level" to damage RIM's bottom line. Theoretically, RIM hardware running locked down Android OS would not compromise any security reputation RIM has; I mean, RIM already dipped its toes in the water with the PB.

    Again, I am lost with regards to the technical aspects.
    06-29-12 09:33 AM
  11. Searzy's Avatar
    Android is only successful because of; It's an open-sourced(initially) Google product.

    Geeks playing "can you top this" are doing the work. Infringing patents, and causing malware in the process.

    As much as Android has some cool flashy things, and as Apple has Applelovers, I prefer a secure business phone even for personal use.

    I'm still here, happily rocking my leaked 7.1 Scorch (ahem Torch 9860, a.k.a. Storm 3)
    06-29-12 09:36 AM
  12. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I am also guessing that a specially skinned, RIM designed locked-to-the-hilt Android OS variant would take significantly less time to put out than BB10.

    But yes, mostly conjecture and wistful dreaming as of now.
    06-29-12 09:36 AM
  13. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Android is only successful because of; It's an open-sourced(initially) Google product.

    Geeks playing "can you top this" are doing the work. Infringing patents, and causing malware in the process.

    As much as Android has some cool flashy things, and as Apple has Applelovers, I prefer a secure business phone even for personal use.

    I'm still here, happily rocking my leaked 7.1 Scorch (ahem Torch 9860, a.k.a. Storm 3)
    A bit myopic. Simply put -- and gently paraphrasing your first statment -- one can say: Android is successful.

    I think it is successful because of its adaptability. Kids can use it, and so can the security-conscious Enterprise sector.
    06-29-12 09:40 AM
  14. Searzy's Avatar
    A bit myopic. Simply put -- and gently paraphrasing your first statment -- one can say: Android is successful.

    I think it is successful because of its adaptability. Kids can use it, and so can the security-conscious Enterprise sector.

    Android adaptability is a result of the (somewhat) open-source. More people working on it.

    IF it wants Enterprise - Google has to truly "close" it, like Apple, and RIM.

    Security.
    06-29-12 09:44 AM
  15. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Hence the two lines approach. The regular bbos phones could do security while the android bb line catches up.

    Still, it's too late for any of this now. We're just playing coulda-been at this point.

    Sent from my BlackBerry 9700 using Tapatalk
    A two headed dragon ? *ouch* I don't believe RIM can actually lead that kind of project.
    We can discuss of what "could have been", but for now shift one's ground is just ... suicide.
    06-29-12 09:45 AM
  16. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Sammy sells locked up Android devices and tablets. There is a branch of the military that is making it's own skinned and ultra-locked down version of Android GB, IIRC. There is literally an Android OS that fits most people's needs (if one likes the OS).

    Point being, Android has not even had to "approach their security level" to damage RIM's bottom line. Theoretically, RIM hardware running locked down Android OS would not compromise any security reputation RIM has; I mean, RIM already dipped its toes in the water with the PB.

    Again, I am lost with regards to the technical aspects.
    I think Sammy WILL sell (announced, but so far I know, not released, but I can be wrong) locked devices, but it is not close to RIM security model. Push upgrades being #1 example.
    Then, the locked version is (as you abbreviated it) ... Ginger Bread = 3 generations late. And, (I can be wrong again) no other Android platform has even required high grade security certification ... this is just not intended for that and anyhow will dismiss a lot of the OS interest ("open", "apps"), so that it wouldn't fit the BYOD trend.
    06-29-12 09:51 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD