07-02-12 03:40 PM
34 12
tools
  1. sosumi11's Avatar
    sosumi11, you are correct but my point was simply that there are some parallels and a company that was failing in all areas could turn around. It is not impossible to do so and Apple is one such example.
    I understand. It is possible but very unlikely. Especially in the tech industry. Apple innovated its way out of the abyss by entering new markets. Apple's example is not one that can be duplicated easily. Even Jim Balsillie admitted it:

    "No other technology company other than Apple has successfully transitioned their platform. It’s almost never done, and it’s way harder than you realize. This transition is where tech companies go to die."

    Where the article that was originally posted states "It’s been impossible to recover from this tailspin so far." is an untrue statement as many companies have switched gears, introduced new products or services and redefined themselves. The problem is more with how RIM is doing mostly everything wrong and very few things right as they change course.
    RIM's problem is that they are still selling themselves as a handset maker. Handset makers are ending up the same way as typewriter, PDA and calculator makers have ended up. Extinct.

    RIM's BB10 is just a catch-up product, no matter how good it is. RIM needed to focus on reinventing the BlackBerry brand to something more than just handsets and a (ahem) tablet.

    RIM's failure is not that their competitors caught up and passed them. Because their competitors never did.

    The computer people took over the industry and RIM was left with nowhere to go.
    07-02-12 11:35 AM
  2. the_sleuth's Avatar
    Just coming out with a new OS is not enough. It's how you integrate it with existing hardware.
    Yes, you're absolutely right. I still do not understand why RIM did not launch a BBOS 7 device with Dev Alpha specs, especially, dual-core and similar screen resolution. Sure BBOS 7 does not need dual-core, but couldn't RIM just disable one core? At least, there would be sales and consumers would be purchasing a future proof device.

    Perhaps, another strategic blunder on RIM's part...
    sosumi11 likes this.
    07-02-12 11:45 AM
  3. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Yep, you *were* correct Superfly. The NOC used to resize images based on the target device. When RIM switched over to the webkit based browser however they stopped doing this.
    Is it ? I've not read about it until this post (reference welcome) ... but thanks, anyway.

    If you make a folder of text and jpgs on your computer and then zip the folder, you will see high compression on the text files, but very little additional compression on the jpegs. This is just a normal characteristic of compression algorithms.[...]
    I think you misread me: the noc is/was RESIZING images accordingly to the device capabilities. So a full 1024X1024 compressed image reduced by - say - 50% will weight much more less (up to 50% or more depending of the type of picture).
    07-02-12 11:53 AM
  4. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    The other problem is that data compression provides some advantage when selling to teenagers, the poor and people in emerging markets who want cheap internet and thus are after the low-tier contracts - it provides no advantage when selling a premium device (bb10) because those users will not be buying such a device to start with...
    Don't forget carriers whose bandwidth is close to congestion and large companies, that pay a lot of $$ for it ...
    07-02-12 11:56 AM
  5. pinkert11's Avatar
    The computer people took over the industry and RIM was left with nowhere to go. This is not really correct. The only computer company in the game at the moment is Apple. MS has been trying to break in for years, and Google supplies the software to mobile vendors. There is lots of room in the market for RIM to live on. Look at RIM like Snapple Gatorade. Not everyone has to be Coke or Pepsi, 78 million users and an annual profit of 1 to 2 billion is not chump change or a poor company.
    07-02-12 01:09 PM
  6. sosumi11's Avatar
    The computer people took over the industry and RIM was left with nowhere to go. This is not really correct. The only computer company in the game at the moment is Apple. MS has been trying to break in for years, and Google supplies the software to mobile vendors. There is lots of room in the market for RIM to live on. Look at RIM like Snapple Gatorade. Not everyone has to be Coke or Pepsi, 78 million users and an annual profit of 1 to 2 billion is not chump change or a poor company.
    Google, Apple and Microsoft make software for desktop class hardware and is the reason they are the leaders. RIM does not. You cannot compare the commodity cola industry to tech.

    Unless you include Dell, HP and all the other commodity box makers.

    The mobile and desktop industries are merging. Where is RIMs place in this arena?
    07-02-12 01:53 PM
  7. papped's Avatar
    Google, Apple and Microsoft make software for desktop class hardware and is the reason they are the leaders. RIM does not. You cannot compare the commodity cola industry to tech.
    Huh? MS hasn't taking over or led anything in the mobile space... Not even close.
    07-02-12 01:54 PM
  8. sosumi11's Avatar
    Huh? MS hasn't taking over or led anything in the mobile space... Not even close.
    What part of mobile and desktop are merging that you don't understand?

    Microsoft has all the time and money in the universe to figure it out plus they have gazillions of installed base users that are willing to wait for a pure xBox and Office integrated platform.

    Windows is all a lot of people only know.
    07-02-12 02:28 PM
  9. cgk's Avatar
    No - read the whole thing, he means specifically within the mobile sector and is not talking generically about tech companies. He's been following the sector for a number of years and so far no company has ever managed it - they either go out of business or are bought out.

    sosumi11, you are correct but my point was simply that there are some parallels and a company that was failing in all areas could turn around. It is not impossible to do so and Apple is one such example. Where the article that was originally posted states "Its been impossible to recover from this tailspin so far." is an untrue statement as many companies have switched gears, introduced new products or services and redefined themselves. The problem is more with how RIM is doing mostly everything wrong and very few things right as they change course.

    Sent from my Lumia 800 using Board Express
    07-02-12 03:40 PM
34 12
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD