1. anon(4216152)'s Avatar
    I was thinking how RIM could overcome the bad news of the last years? This has damaged their brand image in a specific part of the world, North America. Because of this the launch of BB10 will be much harder. BB10 will be judged against the competition and that judgment will be biased due to past negative experience. Chances are that this will make the adoption of BB10 slower than RIM would like, resulting in less profits. What if RIM would sell their business to someone who is willing to continue the BlackBerry business, so that the company's employees can keep their job. So that consumers can get BB10. Depending on how it is sold, shareholders might also profit. I believe that another company has a bigger chance of success then RIM.

    To me it looks like RIM is even preparing itself for a sell. They postponed BB10, so it could launch under a different ownership. They are restructuring as fast as they can. They are building BlackBerry stores (expansion) in parts of the world where they are successful. The BlackBerry name is still very strong in the rest of the world, and RIM is expanding that. They are working off their @sses to create a good relationship with developers, paramount for the success of a new, really new, operating system.

    I think selling the business as a whole, or almost as a whole, would be beneficial for employees, consumers, and shareholders. This won't hold if BB10 will be the greatest success in the history of smartphones, but I think the success will come too slow due to the negative emotions surrounding RIM. So, selling seems a good thing to me, but who would want to buy RIM and continue their business? I'm no fan of buyers that like to split up the company, although I can imagine ditching the part where the phones are made. Other companies are probably just as good at that, against a better price.

    Love to hear the ideas from CrackBerry.com

    Have a nice day
    Last edited by Have_a_nice_day; 07-02-12 at 03:48 PM.
    07-02-12 03:42 PM
  2. jwn66's Avatar
    Here we go again lol. RIM isn't american, you can't just buy it. It's never going to happen or be allowed to just simply be bought. You don't understand all the red tape someone is going to have to go thru and all the restrictions they will have placed on it, it won't be worth it.
    07-02-12 05:33 PM
  3. oldtimeBBaddict's Avatar
    Here we go again lol. RIM isn't american, you can't just buy it. It's never going to happen or be allowed to just simply be bought. You don't understand all the red tape someone is going to have to go thru and all the restrictions they will have placed on it, it won't be worth it.
    Could you give a basic explanation of what would (or might) be required if someone wants to buy a Canadian company?
    07-02-12 05:38 PM
  4. jwn66's Avatar
    Could you give a basic explanation of what would (or might) be required if someone wants to buy a Canadian company?
    No I can't cause the Gov doesn't even know. lul. And we're not talking about some little mom and pop shop which is a little different then a place that employs thousands of canadians, are you starting to see some of the limitations that will be in place, such as can't move or fire or close so and so...
    07-02-12 05:50 PM
  5. oldtimeBBaddict's Avatar
    No I can't cause the Gov doesn't even know. lul. And we're not talking about some little mom and pop shop which is a little different then a place that employs thousands of canadians, are you starting to see some of the limitations that will be in place, such as can't move or fire or close so and so...
    That figures LOL. I have heard only that there might be some issues with the Canadian Government about the sale to an outside (Non-Canadian) interest. I'm just trying to get a handle on what those issues might be.
    07-02-12 06:42 PM
  6. neteng1000's Avatar
    We Canadians and complain about our government all the time. From our restrictions in our banking sec to what we are allowed to watch on TV, etc. They are put in place to protect our best interest. That's the reason why we are not broke like 99% of the rest of the world's governments
    07-02-12 07:04 PM
  7. Thunderbuck's Avatar
    The Canadian government is currently formed by the Conservative Party, and is generally business-friendly; they would be less likely to interfere in a sale than pretty much any of our other political parties. They have also generally been cautious in their comments about a RIM takeover whenever the question has come up in the past while, but have said they believe in letting the market decide RIM's fate.

    That said, they did turn down a $40-billion dollar bid from an Australian mining firm to purchase Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan last year. Different sector, to be sure, and there were other reasons, but it does show that they aren't afraid to step in if they think it suits the national interest.
    07-02-12 07:04 PM
  8. GTiLeo's Avatar
    i'm sure the government won't let RIM get sold to an outside buyer it just lets room for them to bring in peopel on workign visas that don't pay taxes.

    a few months ago i also heard abotu a bail out to help RIM out. keeping canadians employeed keeps the governemnt funded employees in a large company like RIM can bring in millions of dollars in taxes so why would they allow them to be sold and outside companies bring in off shore workers
    07-02-12 07:15 PM
  9. kbz1960's Avatar
    i'm sure the government won't let RIM get sold to an outside buyer it just lets room for them to bring in peopel on workign visas that don't pay taxes.

    a few months ago i also heard abotu a bail out to help RIM out. keeping canadians employeed keeps the governemnt funded employees in a large company like RIM can bring in millions of dollars in taxes so why would they allow them to be sold and outside companies bring in off shore workers
    Welcome to the USA. Wait, you don't do those things yet. Hope you all can keep it that way.
    07-02-12 07:28 PM
  10. silversun10's Avatar
    the rule is net benefit to Canada, if the sale is a net benefit to Canada it is a go, if not not.
    the precedent Potash set implies that if a buy out becomes a political football it is a no go, otherwise it gets approved if nobody cares, and so there is no way nobody notices and so any buyer would have to guarantee the head office in Canada, protect employees and whatever else they can dream up.............
    07-02-12 07:42 PM
  11. hootyhoo's Avatar
    the rule is net benefit to Canada, if the sale is a net benefit to Canada it is a go, if not not.
    the precedent Potash set implies that if a buy out becomes a political football it is a no go, otherwise it gets approved if nobody cares, and so there is no way nobody notices and so any buyer would have to guarantee the head office in Canada, protect employees and whatever else they can dream up.............

    Potash is not a struggling company though. Look at NORTEL for a better example.

    You can only prop up a failing company for so long. In the end, it still fails.
    07-02-12 08:14 PM
  12. neteng1000's Avatar
    The Canadian government needs to step up and support RIM like they did the US auto makers. Sure it saved thousands of Canadian jobs but they once again have their hands out extorting money from our government.
    07-02-12 08:19 PM
  13. silversun10's Avatar
    Potash is not a struggling company though. Look at NORTEL for a better example.

    You can only prop up a failing company for so long. In the end, it still fails.
    Potash is THE example of a buyout denied under the net profit to Canada, that is what we were talking about, you are having a discussion about something else.
    07-02-12 08:48 PM
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