1. Grafic111's Avatar
    Foxconn has taken over complete manufacturing and production of BlackBerry devices. Are they producing only Z3 or also the Z10, Q10, Z30 which have been manufactured this year. My Z30 was manufactured in April 2014. Just curious. Coz Blackberry themselves have closed down all manufacturing.

    Posted from my SuperHuman Q10
    06-18-14 01:45 AM
  2. anon(7808135)'s Avatar
    How did you find this out exactly? I don't think BlackBerry would go completely to Foxconn on high end devices.

    Posted with my Z10 from God
    06-18-14 01:52 AM
  3. Atmarix's Avatar
    Source please?

    Posted via CB10
    06-18-14 02:00 AM
  4. Rello's Avatar
    Pretty sure u don't have your facts straight. Fairly sure BlackBerry will still produce certain high end devices


    Posted via CB10
    06-18-14 03:06 AM
  5. Grafic111's Avatar
    How did you find this out exactly? I don't think BlackBerry would go completely to Foxconn on high end devices.

    Posted with my Z10 from God
    I don't know. That is why I have put it out there.

    Posted from my SuperHuman Q10
    06-18-14 03:11 AM
  6. dustmalik's Avatar
    OP, how did you know your Z30 was manufactured in April 2014?

    Posted via CB10 using my Gorgeous Z30
    06-18-14 05:04 AM
  7. Playbook007's Avatar
    Foxconn only has the z3.

    Posted via CB10
    06-18-14 05:40 AM
  8. BlackBerry Guy's Avatar
    I'm not sure how it is with the Z3 or Z30, but with every BlackBerry I've owned, on the box there's a label, and on the corner of the label it will show the date, country of origin and a number (which I believe indicates which factory it came from).
    06-18-14 09:40 AM
  9. robsteve's Avatar
    I'm not sure how it is with the Z3 or Z30, but with every BlackBerry I've owned, on the box there's a label, and on the corner of the label it will show the date, country of origin and a number (which I believe indicates which factory it came from).
    If it is like the PlayBook, the date code is when it was boxed, not made.

    Posted via CB10
    06-18-14 10:44 AM
  10. donmateo's Avatar
    Only the Z3 is Foxconn, the rest (for now) are in-house.
    06-18-14 11:51 AM
  11. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    The last Z10s and Q10s were manufactured in June of 2013, and the last Z30 around September 2013, by Jabil Curcuit, for BB. None of them are in production by any means - BB doesn't even have a contract with Jabil Circuit anymore (as of Oct 2013). The Z3 is the only device currently in production (small-scale, and by Foxconn). Of course, the "Classic" (Q20) and the Q30 have been announced for release later this year, and presumably will be manufactured by Foxconn as well.

    As others have noted, the date on the box is not the manufacturing date of the device, but rather the date the device was boxed up for sale, and that is apparently done in small batches as needed, which allows updated insert materials and potentially even OS updates to be performed prior to boxing.
    06-18-14 04:56 PM
  12. m1kr0's Avatar
    The last Z10s and Q10s were manufactured in June of 2013, and the last Z30 around September 2013, by Jabil Curcuit, for BB. None of them are in production by any means - BB doesn't even have a contract with Jabil Circuit anymore (as of Oct 2013). The Z3 is the only device currently in production (small-scale, and by Foxconn). Of course, the "Classic" (Q20) and the Q30 have been announced for release later this year, and presumably will be manufactured by Foxconn as well.

    As others have noted, the date on the box is not the manufacturing date of the device, but rather the date the device was boxed up for sale, and that is apparently done in small batches as needed, which allows updated insert materials and potentially even OS updates to be performed prior to boxing.
    Troy, doesn't BlackBerry have any production facilities of their own?

    Z10 STL100-1, OS 10.2.1.3175
    06-18-14 05:16 PM
  13. Bbnivende's Avatar
    The last Z10s and Q10s were manufactured in June of 2013, and the last Z30 around September 2013, by Jabil Curcuit, for BB. None of them are in production by any means - BB doesn't even have a contract with Jabil Circuit anymore (as of Oct 2013). The Z3 is the only device currently in production (small-scale, and by Foxconn). Of course, the "Classic" (Q20) and the Q30 have been announced for release later this year, and presumably will be manufactured by Foxconn as well.

    As others have noted, the date on the box is not the manufacturing date of the device, but rather the date the device was boxed up for sale, and that is apparently done in small batches as needed, which allows updated insert materials and potentially even OS updates to be performed prior to boxing.
    I think you should be a paid contributor. Always nice to have some actual facts. No wonder folks refer to BlackBerry selling last year's phones today.

    Posted via CB10
    Troy Tiscareno likes this.
    06-18-14 07:53 PM
  14. RubberChicken76's Avatar
    The last Z10s and Q10s were manufactured in June of 2013, and the last Z30 around September 2013, by Jabil Curcuit, for BB. None of them are in production by any means - BB doesn't even have a contract with Jabil Circuit anymore (as of Oct 2013).
    How do you get this information?
    06-18-14 07:57 PM
  15. ljfong's Avatar
    I think you should be a paid contributor. Always nice to have some actual facts. No wonder folks refer to BlackBerry selling last year's phones today.

    Posted via CB10
    The problem is, Troy does not sugarcoat his posts, therefore he is automatically disqualified. Remember: to contribute to the front page of CB, you have to be upbeat and sugarcoat things up to the wazoo, never mind that the sky is falling. It's perpetual sunshine of hope (reminds of that Jubei dude).
    06-18-14 08:04 PM
  16. eldricho's Avatar
    The last Z10s and Q10s were manufactured in June of 2013, and the last Z30 around September 2013, by Jabil Curcuit, for BB. None of them are in production by any means - BB doesn't even have a contract with Jabil Circuit anymore (as of Oct 2013). The Z3 is the only device currently in production (small-scale, and by Foxconn). Of course, the "Classic" (Q20) and the Q30 have been announced for release later this year, and presumably will be manufactured by Foxconn as well.

    As others have noted, the date on the box is not the manufacturing date of the device, but rather the date the device was boxed up for sale, and that is apparently done in small batches as needed, which allows updated insert materials and potentially even OS updates to be performed prior to boxing.
    Thanks for this, man!
    Never knew that first generation device production is completely flat now

    Posted via CB10
    06-18-14 09:32 PM
  17. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    How do you get this information?
    Every quarter, I read the Earning Reports for all 4 platforms and I also pay attention to major press releases. This information is all there if you look for it, and we've discussed BB's here on CB many times in the past.
    06-19-14 01:43 AM
  18. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Troy, doesn't BlackBerry have any production facilities of their own?
    They have (or had) a facility to do very low-volume production in Canada. A small percentage of Z10s came from there, and likely all of the production prototypes are made there as well. But, again, it's capable of only a small fraction of their manufacturing contractors. It's far too expensive to manufacture in North America, which is why the Canadian factory is tiny and low-volume. Plus, BB, like many companies, isn't really a manufacturer; it does design and engineering, but very little actual production. That's all outsourced, just like Apple has Foxconn and others manufacture iPhones. That's a not-very-well-kept secret for the consumer electronics industry: most brand-name devices are not actually manufactured by the company whose logo is on the device. My Sony TV has a Samsung LCD panel inside of it, while iPhones and Galaxy phones have Sony cameras inside.
    JeepBB and m1kr0 like this.
    06-19-14 01:50 AM
  19. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Thanks for this, man!
    Never knew that first generation device production is completely flat now.
    Most people don't really understand manufacturing. Here's an interesting example:

    A few years ago, ammunition was in short supply, as a number of factors came together to increase demand, one of which was the US government funding a massive contract to buy ammo. The thing is: ammo manufacturers normally run their machines as close to 24/7/365 as they can at all times, so there is virtually no "surge capacity" to increase production when demand spikes. Expanding a plant and buying additional production machines is a HUGE capital expense, and if the spike in demand is only temporary, than all the money spent to increase capacity could be wasted as the machines sit idle, unable to recoup their investment. As a result, it took a LONG time (almost 3 years) for ammo prices to even start to stabilize.

    Also, the way those machines work is this: to run a certain caliber of ammo (say: .357 Magnum), the machine has to be reconfigured with all of the appropriate sized dies and punches and other parts, and re-calibrated to operate reliably, which can take several days to a week of downtime. What happens next is that that machine will produce a big batch of a certain load of .357 Mag ammo - enough for 3-5 years of projected sales, which might take that machine 1-3 months of continuous production to produce. Then, the machine is reconfigured for the next desired load, and the previous .357 load may not be produced again for several years, with all sales coming from the inventory from the previous run.

    And that's fine as long as demand follows projections, but if demand more than doubles, then 5 years worth of ammo might get sold out in only 2 years, but it might take another 2 years for that loading to be scheduled for manufacturing again, which means that that particular load of .357 Mag ammo will be completely unavailable for 2+ years until another manufacturing run can be scheduled. And that's exactly what happened.

    More common, higher-volume calibers like 9mm are run more often, or kept in continuous production, but rare/low-volume loadings like .458 Winchester may only be manufactured once every 5-10 years, so your "factory new" ammo may be 7 or 8 years old in some cases.

    That kind of manufacturing doesn't work with perishable items, and doesn't work well for tech items that go obsolete quickly, which is why the Z10s had to be written down: BB made about 6-7 million of them, and to date probably haven't sold 4 million Z10s, and the ones left over continue to lose value as they fall further and further behind the devices being released today.
    06-19-14 02:07 AM
  20. Rolf Hed's Avatar
    Most people don't really understand manufacturing. Here's an interesting example:

    A few years ago, ammunition was in short supply, as a number of factors came together to increase demand, one of which was the US government funding a massive contract to buy ammo. The thing is: ammo manufacturers normally run their machines as close to 24/7/365 as they can at all times, so there is virtually no "surge capacity" to increase production when demand spikes. Expanding a plant and buying additional production machines is a HUGE capital expense, and if the spike in demand is only temporary, than all the money spent to increase capacity could be wasted as the machines sit idle, unable to recoup their investment. As a result, it took a LONG time (almost 3 years) for ammo prices to even start to stabilize.

    Also, the way those machines work is this: to run a certain caliber of ammo (say: .357 Magnum), the machine has to be reconfigured with all of the appropriate sized dies and punches and other parts, and re-calibrated to operate reliably, which can take several days to a week of downtime. What happens next is that that machine will produce a big batch of a certain load of .357 Mag ammo - enough for 3-5 years of projected sales, which might take that machine 1-3 months of continuous production to produce. Then, the machine is reconfigured for the next desired load, and the previous .357 load may not be produced again for several years, with all sales coming from the inventory from the previous run.

    And that's fine as long as demand follows projections, but if demand more than doubles, then 5 years worth of ammo might get sold out in only 2 years, but it might take another 2 years for that loading to be scheduled for manufacturing again, which means that that particular load of .357 Mag ammo will be completely unavailable for 2+ years until another manufacturing run can be scheduled. And that's exactly what happened.

    More common, higher-volume calibers like 9mm are run more often, or kept in continuous production, but rare/low-volume loadings like .458 Winchester may only be manufactured once every 5-10 years, so your "factory new" ammo may be 7 or 8 years old in some cases.

    That kind of manufacturing doesn't work with perishable items, and doesn't work well for tech items that go obsolete quickly, which is why the Z10s had to be written down: BB made about 6-7 million of them, and to date probably haven't sold 4 million Z10s, and the ones left over continue to lose value as they fall further and further behind the devices being released today.
    Thanks, Troy. You should definitely write for CB for Mobile Nations-at-large. :-)
    06-19-14 02:24 AM
  21. quailallstar's Avatar
    The last Z10s and Q10s were manufactured in June of 2013, and the last Z30 around September 2013, by Jabil Curcuit, for BB. None of them are in production by any means - BB doesn't even have a contract with Jabil Circuit anymore (as of Oct 2013). The Z3 is the only device currently in production (small-scale, and by Foxconn). Of course, the "Classic" (Q20) and the Q30 have been announced for release later this year, and presumably will be manufactured by Foxconn as well.

    As others have noted, the date on the box is not the manufacturing date of the device, but rather the date the device was boxed up for sale, and that is apparently done in small batches as needed, which allows updated insert materials and potentially even OS updates to be performed prior to boxing.
    Thanks for this great information. So below is the picture of a new Z30 I got this week off BlackBerry's website with their 30% sale. If the box states the date of April 24, 2014 then that is when it was boxed up. How can I go about checking when the actual phone was assembled if even possible?

    08-19-14 10:08 AM
  22. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Thanks for this great information. So below is the picture of a new Z30 I got this week off BlackBerry's website with their 30% sale. If the box states the date of April 24, 2014 then that is when it was boxed up. How can I go about checking when the actual phone was assembled if even possible?
    All of the Z30s were produced around July-Sept 2013. They are boxed up as ordered from carriers/retailers, and the date is the packaging date. The Z30 was manufactured by Jabil Circuit, who manufactured a lot of BB's previous devices. Jabil canceled BB's contract in Oct 2013 as at that time, BB had no devices scheduled for production (by Jabil) anytime in the near future.
    08-19-14 04:52 PM
  23. quailallstar's Avatar
    All of the Z30s were produced around July-Sept 2013. They are boxed up as ordered from carriers/retailers, and the date is the packaging date. The Z30 was manufactured by Jabil Circuit, who manufactured a lot of BB's previous devices. Jabil canceled BB's contract in Oct 2013 as at that time, BB had no devices scheduled for production (by Jabil) anytime in the near future.
    How can I check to see when the device was made?
    08-20-14 05:15 AM
  24. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    How can I check to see when the device was made?
    You really can't. There might be some hidden debug code or something that BB can check, but there's nothing that a normal end-user can look at to tell. It's not in BB's best interest for you to know stuff like this (same with most manufacturing). In the ammo example I gave above, the ammo manufacturers don't want you to know you might be buying ammo that was actually manufactured 5-6 years ago (in some cases) - customers believe they are getting "factory fresh" ammo and it isn't in the best interests of the manufacturer to dispel that rumor.
    quailallstar and LoneStarRed like this.
    08-20-14 10:05 AM

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