1. Mangelhaft's Avatar
    Looking at the new BBOS 10 Phones, I wonder if Blackberry has formulated a new miltiprong buisness strategy.

    I have the general thought that the smarter the phones get, the dumber the users get, at least in the U.S. Ok so this is a very general statement which paints the mobile phone community with a very broad brush,and is greatly exagerated, but please, hear me out. The majority of U.S. phone consumers buy a phone primarily as a status symbol: They buy the most expensive device that the manufactures say that they need and that everyone else wants. They also want a portable jukebox, camera, video game system, movie player, internet browser, GPS navigator, etc., with a phone added in, without any thought to privacy or security. They want a phone that requires almost no thought to learn and operate, la Microsoft's increasing effort to simplify Windows, while making it harder to actually customize and optimize a PC OS. This is why the large phones, which are approaching the footprint of a netbook, have become so popular. I believe that this is why the Z series BlackBerrys came about.

    Many of the diehard Blackberry users prefer an actual keyboard. This accounts fot the Q series. Hopefully the Q20 and even a Q30 will be released for those of us who want to benefit from a solid BlackBerry device, the latest BlackBerry innnovation, and have a keyboard.

    Maintaing both the Z and Q series of phones, with the Android app capability, should satiate the BlackBerry appitites of the U. S. and developed world, as well as attract new users and hopefully bring back some former users.

    The release of the Q5 in the developing world appears to be a great move for BlackBerry to gain a foothold in under served regions and is likely to foster BlackBerry loyalty as the economies develope.

    Regaining focus on the Enterprise market is also a smart move to at least maintain BlackBerry's remaining enterprise clients.

    By maintainging the security integrity of its devices, such as the FIPS certification, I am sure that BlackBerrys will remain the prefered mobile devices approved by governments. (When I was in the US Air Force, we were strongly encouraged, if not out right required, to have a BlackBerry, if we chose to have a mobile phone.)

    My assessment is that by diversifying its products, refocusing on enterprise services, and following a multiprong buisness approach, BlackBerry will restablish its place as a global mobile device power.

    Any thoughts?
    03-21-14 03:22 AM
  2. sixpacker's Avatar
    Looking at the new BBOS 10 Phones, I wonder if Blackberry has formulated a new miltiprong buisness strategy.

    I have the general thought that the smarter the phones get, the dumber the users get, at least in the U.S. Ok so this is a very general statement which paints the mobile phone community with a very broad brush,and is greatly exagerated, but please, hear me out. The majority of U.S. phone consumers buy a phone primarily as a status symbol: They buy the most expensive device that the manufactures say that they need and that everyone else wants. They also want a portable jukebox, camera, video game system, movie player, internet browser, GPS navigator, etc., with a phone added in, without any thought to privacy or security. They want a phone that requires almost no thought to learn and operate, la Microsoft's increasing effort to simplify Windows, while making it harder to actually customize and optimize a PC OS. This is why the large phones, which are approaching the footprint of a netbook, have become so popular. I believe that this is why the Z series BlackBerrys came about.

    Many of the diehard Blackberry users prefer an actual keyboard. This accounts fot the Q series. Hopefully the Q20 and even a Q30 will be released for those of us who want to benefit from a solid BlackBerry device, the latest BlackBerry innnovation, and have a keyboard.

    Maintaing both the Z and Q series of phones, with the Android app capability, should satiate the BlackBerry appitites of the U. S. and developed world, as well as attract new users and hopefully bring back some former users.

    The release of the Q5 in the developing world appears to be a great move for BlackBerry to gain a foothold in under served regions and is likely to foster BlackBerry loyalty as the economies develope.

    Regaining focus on the Enterprise market is also a smart move to at least maintain BlackBerry's remaining enterprise clients.

    By maintainging the security integrity of its devices, such as the FIPS certification, I am sure that BlackBerrys will remain the prefered mobile devices approved by governments. (When I was in the US Air Force, we were strongly encouraged, if not out right required, to have a BlackBerry, if we chose to have a mobile phone.)

    My assessment is that by diversifying its products, refocusing on enterprise services, and following a multiprong buisness approach, BlackBerry will restablish its place as a global mobile device power.

    Any thoughts?
    Your generalisation is just silly. It's not dumb to want an easy to operate highly functional device. Sure, to many, phones are designer objects, but people are now not rushing out to buy the most expensive blackberry devices are they?
    BlackBerry have always had a multi pronged approach. Their problem now is a damaged /invisible brand and a lack of product differentiation. You miss the key point, innovation. Pushing out variants of a failed product won't reverse their fortunes in the mass market. They need a major rework of bb10 to make it attractive to the masses. Chen, however, is focused on enterprise and revival on legacy features such as the belt. Innovation isn't on his radar.
    03-21-14 04:03 AM
  3. Mangelhaft's Avatar
    Your generalisation is just silly. It's not dumb to want an easy to operate highly functional device. Sure, to many, phones are designer objects, but people are now not rushing out to buy the most expensive blackberry devices are they?
    BlackBerry have always had a multi pronged approach. Their problem now is a damaged /invisible brand and a lack of product differentiation. You miss the key point, innovation. Pushing out variants of a failed product won't reverse their fortunes in the mass market. They need a major rework of bb10 to make it attractive to the masses. Chen, however, is focused on enterprise and revival on legacy features such as the belt. Innovation isn't on his radar.
    I have no problems with easy to operate, but there is a point where "dumbing-down" is crippling. I am not suggesting that we need a tedium of solving quadratic equations ENIAC style with punch cards. It is that the current US market is full of people who want instant gratification with no thought. This is what I see when using my work supplied Android-based phone or Note tablet. Increased simplification equals reduced variegated functionality. As far as shelling out for the newest expensive phone, I know many people who waited in-line for the new iPhone or Samsung, when their previous device was purchased mere months earlier. But these are the same people who live in $10,000 houses and drive $45,000 cars. Yet another generalization, I admit. I have also noticed this trend among all socio-economic groups.

    BlackBerry may have had a poly-faceted approach, in the past, but they dropped the ball. It appears that they are becoming more diverse, for the better. Reinforcing the enterprise services, catering to the dichotomy of U. S. consumer demands, getting a foot hold in underserved/underdeveloped markets, and maintain/improving product security and dependability should allow BlackBerry to build its reserves for the marathon it faces.

    What is there left to innovate? Wireless communications? Check. Multi format and multi platform text messaging? Check. Multimedia messages? Check. E-Mail capability? Check. Still and moving digital imaging? Check. Media file storage and playback? Check. File sharing? Check. Touch screens? Check. Etc. Etc. Etc. Currently, what more could be packed into these mobile devices. (I would like to get a pint of Guinness out of my Q10, but I am not holding my breath.) The only place for advancement is on the component level. Faster processors, more memory, etc. But here we are reaching the limits with silicon integrated circuit technology. Power consumption and storage will always be a concern, but they are directly related to processing power and battery capacity. What has any Android platform or iPhone done lately? Oh yeah, commercials pushing the mindless masses to separate from their money in exchange for the latest model with a redesigned shell and slightly updated OS.

    I do not see any “failed products” in BlackBerry’s history, just failed marketing to the masses. I believe that there is still a solid core of BlackBerry loyalists. Once the company’s regrouping is complete, and the coffers filling, I believe that there will be a big push.

    As far as Chen’s focus on Legacy features, that is where the Z and Q series should fill market demands. I miss my 9900’s belt. I also prefer the keyboard. Ever try using a touch screen in -20F temperatures? It does not function.
    03-21-14 05:03 AM
  4. sixpacker's Avatar
    I have no problems with easy to operate, but there is a point where "dumbing-down" is crippling. I am not suggesting that we need a tedium of solving quadratic equations ENIAC style with punch cards. It is that the current US market is full of people who want instant gratification with no thought. This is what I see when using my work supplied Android-based phone or Note tablet. Increased simplification equals reduced variegated functionality. As far as shelling out for the newest expensive phone, I know many people who waited in-line for the new iPhone or Samsung, when their previous device was purchased mere months earlier. But these are the same people who live in $10,000 houses and drive $45,000 cars. Yet another generalization, I admit. I have also noticed this trend among all socio-economic groups.

    BlackBerry may have had a poly-faceted approach, in the past, but they dropped the ball. It appears that they are becoming more diverse, for the better. Reinforcing the enterprise services, catering to the dichotomy of U. S. consumer demands, getting a foot hold in underserved/underdeveloped markets, and maintain/improving product security and dependability should allow BlackBerry to build its reserves for the marathon it faces.

    What is there left to innovate? Wireless communications? Check. Multi format and multi platform text messaging? Check. Multimedia messages? Check. E-Mail capability? Check. Still and moving digital imaging? Check. Media file storage and playback? Check. File sharing? Check. Touch screens? Check. Etc. Etc. Etc. Currently, what more could be packed into these mobile devices. (I would like to get a pint of Guinness out of my Q10, but I am not holding my breath.) The only place for advancement is on the component level. Faster processors, more memory, etc. But here we are reaching the limits with silicon integrated circuit technology. Power consumption and storage will always be a concern, but they are directly related to processing power and battery capacity. What has any Android platform or iPhone done lately? Oh yeah, commercials pushing the mindless masses to separate from their money in exchange for the latest model with a redesigned shell and slightly updated OS.

    I do not see any “failed products” in BlackBerry’s history, just failed marketing to the masses. I believe that there is still a solid core of BlackBerry loyalists. Once the company’s regrouping is complete, and the coffers filling, I believe that there will be a big push.

    As far as Chen’s focus on Legacy features, that is where the Z and Q series should fill market demands. I miss my 9900’s belt. I also prefer the keyboard. Ever try using a touch screen in -20F temperatures? It does not function.
    Sure, we are probably in a phase of improvement rather than mind blowing innovation. The likes of Samsung however will be focused on battery technology, wireless charging, better displays, thinner devices etc to give them differentiation.
    BlackBerry has given up on hardware so can only differentiate in software solutions. I personally have found bb10 a dull and uninspiring experience and, regardless of the clear marketing problems, is a product failure due to its lack of differentiation from the competition. If it were a radical game changer social media and word of mouth would have seen sales growing rapidly by now.
    Sure there's a niche for physical keyboards but the mass market has long moved to prioritising screen relestate as data services become more dominant in everyday life.
    As for a big push I hope you are right, personally I am still skeptical about the long term objectives.
    03-21-14 06:53 AM
  5. Bbnivende's Avatar
    Sure, we are probably in a phase of improvement rather than mind blowing innovation. The likes of Samsung however will be focused on battery technology, wireless charging, better displays, thinner devices etc to give them differentiation.
    BlackBerry has given up on hardware so can only differentiate in software solutions. I personally have found bb10 a dull and uninspiring experience and, regardless of the clear marketing problems, is a product failure due to its lack of differentiation from the competition. If it were a radical game changer social media and word of mouth would have seen sales growing rapidly by now.
    Sure there's a niche for physical keyboards but the mass market has long moved to prioritising screen relestate as data services become more dominant in everyday life.
    As for a big push I hope you are right, personally I am still skeptical about the long term objectives.
    I am hopeful that this new hybrid BB10 solution for the Q20 will appeal to legacy owners and be an improvement over BB10 on the Q10. I am hopeful that the Z3 gains some traction in Indonesia and in Africa and India. I am hopeful that under Foxconn / Chen that BlackBerry can sell some phones in China.

    I am hopeful that moving manufacturing facilities closer to these developing markets will result in better penetration in these markets. I am hopeful that Foxconn can design and build a flagship Z model . I am hopeful that BlackBerry lowers its prices on devices sold to businesses . Lastly, I am hopeful that BlackBerry makes BIS and LTE versions of the Z3.
    03-21-14 10:24 AM
  6. toneytone's Avatar
    Innovation innovation innovation. The Q30's new keyboard along with a much wider qwerty will help things out for this year at least. 10.3 and beyond will need to truly take off as well. Balance between the enterprise and regular consumer will keep them in the game.

    Posted via Z30 C0002FDEF
    Mangelhaft likes this.
    03-21-14 07:04 PM
  7. early2bed's Avatar
    "Multipronged" can also mean unfocused and reactive. It certainly isn't efficient. Does it really make sense that the smartphone platform with the smallest market share is going to try to maintain the most diverse line of products? Do they expect the carriers to carry and stock 3-4 different kinds of devices that they sell the fewest of? It doesn't seem like a sound strategy to me.

    Another risky strategy? Assuming that customers are, in general, foolish.
    03-21-14 07:22 PM

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