1. phonejunky's Avatar
    05-03-10 07:56 AM
  2. Reed McLay's Avatar
    186 views and nobody has told him yet?

    Brandon, you posted a broken link. NYT is a subscription service.

    However... the text is in there:

    BERLIN - With the majority of Internet traffic expected to shift to congestion-prone mobile networks, there is growing debate on both sides of the Atlantic about whether operators of the networks should be allowed to treat Web users differently, based on the users' consumption.
    Proponents of the current system - called network neutrality - see that principle as a kind of civil rights declaration of the digital age, one that requires the gatekeepers of the global Internet to treat all users equally, regardless of application, source or download limit.
    While operators have never been required to maintain neutrality, the industry has created that expectation largely by charging users a flat rate for unlimited Internet access.
    But there is a big flaw in the concept, according to the operators: Networks have never been neutral. They have always been actively managed to some extent since their inception in the 1980s to ensure that all customers get a basic "best effort" level of service.
    If an operator could not restrain bandwidth hogs, who typically make up 15 percent of customers but who generate 80 percent of the traffic, most Internet users would experience poor service.
    The Internet has never been a neutral environment left to develop freely on a first-come, first-serve basis," said Stuart Orr, the head of the telecommunications group in Europe, Africa and Latin America for Accenture, a U.S. software services consultant.
    The arcane issue of network management, and the free speech and competition issues it raises, has taken on broader political importance as operators have increasingly micromanaged the flow of data, favoring some users over others as they have sought to handle exploding levels of traffic or deliver premium broadband service at guaranteed speeds to heavy users and businesses.
    05-04-10 12:31 PM
  3. pkcable's Avatar
    I thought I might have to be on mobile to see it and kept meaning to try from the berry, BUT kept forgetting. But subscription would explain it, knew for sure I could not read it!
    05-04-10 01:13 PM
  4. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I do not subscribe to the NYT, but I am able to read the entire article in the Firefox browser on the PC. The article appears as the mobile version, but all 4 pages are readable.
    05-04-10 01:47 PM
  5. mjbesen310's Avatar
    I do not subscribe to the NYT, but I am able to read the entire article in the Firefox browser on the PC. The article appears as the mobile version, but all 4 pages are readable.
    same here.. I do not subscribe to NYT, and I can also view the article just fine running Google Chrome browser
    05-04-10 03:56 PM
  6. JoelTruckerDude's Avatar
    186 views and nobody has told him yet?

    Brandon, you posted a broken link. NYT is a subscription service.

    However... the text is in there:


    Maybe nobody was interested?
    05-05-10 06:25 AM
  7. i7guy's Avatar
    Interested in the article or interested in telling? :-D Mobile is fine.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Last edited by i7guy; 05-05-10 at 06:42 AM.
    05-05-10 06:40 AM
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