04-01-16 01:31 AM
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  1. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    But that assumes you back up your phone and that you use password keeper. I, for example, don't and I don't trust Blend either...
    Of course no cloud is secure.
    Yep, which is why I assume that they cannot crack BB10.
    damien kupuku likes this.
    03-30-16 07:15 AM
  2. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    The information was obtained from the NSA NOT any third party, they are able to decrypt anything except BlackBerry devices easily. There was inter / intra agency cooperation on this hack. If anyone doubts that they are clearly unaware of the capability of the NSA.

    Posted via CB10
    damien kupuku likes this.
    03-30-16 07:27 AM
  3. sorinv's Avatar
    It's much more convenient for the US government, NSA and FBI if Cellebrite did it. It utterly humiliates Apple. It wouldn't be as bad for Apple if the NSA did it, although they most likely have the capability.
    03-30-16 07:33 AM
  4. sorinv's Avatar
    Yep, which is why I assume that they cannot crack BB10.
    The main weakness of all BlackBerry phones is that BlackBerry has no control over the ICs in the phone. BlackBerry does not design the ICs that go in the phone. US companies do.
    Neither do they control the SDCARD.
    All of these are controlled by the NSA.

    The Cellebrite website clearly states that they can decrypt the external memory of a BB10 phone, without requiring BlackBerry ID.
    This article from the Globe and Mail writes that Apple has started to build their own servers because they no longer trust the ones they purchase.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...ticle29425192/

    This remains BlackBerry's problem even if they decide to become a software only company. They cannot guarantee security if they don't control and design the hardware.
    Last edited by sorinv; 03-30-16 at 08:21 AM.
    03-30-16 07:46 AM
  5. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    The information was obtained from the NSA NOT any third party, they are able to decrypt anything except BlackBerry devices easily. There was inter / intra agency cooperation on this hack. If anyone doubts that they are clearly unaware of the capability of the NSA.
    You have zero evidence of this, correct?
    Eumaeus likes this.
    03-30-16 08:06 AM
  6. TGR1's Avatar
    They don't even need the body. What they need is the fingerprint. It's the FBI, they know how to cook (lol) it.
    BTW, it's 5 more free attempts.
    5 attempts to find the right fingerprint. Sure, easy to solve. Assuming he did use a typical part of his finger.
    03-30-16 09:14 AM
  7. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    The terrorists smashed their personal phones and PCs, but left the work phone intact. Obviously, there's nothing of value on it. It's all just security theater.
    Eumaeus likes this.
    03-30-16 10:01 AM
  8. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    5 attempts to find the right fingerprint. Sure, easy to solve. Assuming he did use a typical part of his finger.
    That's real life. If ever he used a fingerprint, the actual fingerprint will be on the touch id spot, even partially.
    They know how to handle that.
    Chances are it's one of his "usual hand" finger (right or left handed, he is) so that 5 attempts ... lol.
    Fingerprint is NOWHERE secure, furthermore it's a blatant threat (unchangeable personal unique ID = absolute no-go ... or should it be ...)

    P.S: I would not be surprised if the "hack" is more social-engineering related, BTW.
    03-30-16 11:07 AM
  9. Alain_A's Avatar
    The main weakness of all BlackBerry phones is that BlackBerry has no control over the ICs in the phone. BlackBerry does not design the ICs that go in the phone. US companies do.
    Neither do they control the SDCARD.
    All of these are controlled by the NSA.

    The Cellebrite website clearly states that they can decrypt the external memory of a BB10 phone, without requiring BlackBerry ID.
    This article from the Globe and Mail writes that Apple has started to build their own servers because they no longer trust the ones they purchase.

    There is a winner in Apple?s court battle with the FBI - The Globe and Mail

    This remains BlackBerry's problem even if they decide to become a software only company. They cannot guarantee security if they don't control and design the hardware.
    What is ICs?
    03-30-16 11:34 AM
  10. raino's Avatar
    The information was obtained from the NSA NOT any third party, they are able to decrypt anything except BlackBerry devices easily. There was inter / intra agency cooperation on this hack. If anyone doubts that they are clearly unaware of the capability of the NSA.
    Hmm..I don't know about this. If this was an inter-agency thing, surely it would have been handled before a court case was to be filed? Unless you're saying it's the NSA that figured out how to get into the iPhone post-lawsuit, and not a third party company.

    What is ICs?
    Integrated circuits
    03-30-16 12:07 PM
  11. stevec66's Avatar
    A previous poster hit the nail on the head, most people using iPhone s are only interested in the apps available on the phone and keeping in touch with their friends via social media. When it comes to security they seem to have no expectations of security when using their phones.

    Posted via CB10
    03-30-16 12:15 PM
  12. MikeX74's Avatar
    A previous poster hit the nail on the head, most people using iPhone s are only interested in the apps available on the phone and keeping in touch with their friends via social media. When it comes to security they seem to have no expectations of security when using their phones.

    Posted via CB10
    So, more generalizations?
    TGR1, Elephant_Canyon and Eumaeus like this.
    03-30-16 01:42 PM
  13. Litigator08's Avatar
    The common sense dictates that if the terrorist's iPhone was idtouch capable the device would be unlocked a few hours later from his death.

    You know, the biometric security so innovative.

    Posted with my loyal Z30
    Actually in the event a terrorist stops cloud backups for weeks before a terrorist attack, "common sense" dictates that particular terrorist is unlikely to use any type of biometric security feature, at least on a device in which there is any meaningful data.
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    03-30-16 03:11 PM
  14. Gallofa's Avatar
    Actually in the event a terrorist stops cloud backups for weeks before a terrorist attack, "common sense" dictates that particular terrorist is unlikely to use any type of biometric security feature, at least on a device in which there is any meaningful data.
    Totally agree.

    Biometric security has the user and password all in one. With the added feature that it can be triggered without the user will in some cases. Not an infalible method in my opinion.

    Posted with my loyal Z30
    03-30-16 03:30 PM
  15. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    You have zero evidence of this, correct?
    More than you think

    Posted via CB10
    03-30-16 03:38 PM
  16. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    Hmm..I don't know about this. If this was an inter-agency thing, surely it would have been handled before a court case was to be filed? Unless you're saying it's the NSA that figured out how to get into the iPhone post-lawsuit, and not a third party company.



    Integrated circuits
    There is very little inter agency cooperation going on at this point. They DON'T READILY share information amongst themselves including the "other agency" that does surveillance . This is the problem and legally there is the constraints within the law itself, that does not permit the sharing of that information , as the means by which the information is obtained is legally questionable.

    Posted via CB10
    03-30-16 03:44 PM
  17. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    More than you think
    So, absolutely none, then.
    03-30-16 04:14 PM
  18. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    So, absolutely none, then.
    Whatever rocks Your pirogue

    Posted via CB10
    03-30-16 04:15 PM
  19. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    If you have something, by all means, post a link.
    Eumaeus likes this.
    03-30-16 04:16 PM
  20. buwee's Avatar
    Any one phone can be forensically hacked. This doesn't really say much about any secutiry. Even a blackberry could be broken into. The issue here was never whether 1 phone could be hacked, it was about the legal ramifications of the government forcing apple to put back-doors in their software.
    No, it was about Apple trying to portray the iPhone as being a secure device and trying to play hardball with LE, Now they're scrambling cause the FBI hacked into their supposedly secure phone without Apple's help LOL.
    raino likes this.
    03-30-16 04:42 PM
  21. buwee's Avatar
    So, more generalizations?
    Why do you keep insisting these are generalizations...everyone I know with an iPhone buys them because of the apps and the so called "status" LOL
    03-30-16 04:59 PM
  22. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    NYT reports San Bernardino iPhone hacked!-img_20160331_082146.png

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    03-30-16 05:22 PM
  23. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    CB app sometimes hangs... :-) ^

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    03-30-16 05:22 PM
  24. si001's Avatar
    I'm certain it's "moot point", but it's all gooder dooders! The most secure device is the BlackBerry 950!!!

    The point is not moot!

    Moot point | Define Moot point at Dictionary.com

    Check out the review:

    RIM BlackBerry 950 Review
    "Powered by one AA alkaline"

    lolll

    Posted via CB10
    03-30-16 06:43 PM
  25. donnation's Avatar
    A previous poster hit the nail on the head, most people using iPhone s are only interested in the apps available on the phone and keeping in touch with their friends via social media. When it comes to security they seem to have no expectations of security when using their phones.

    Posted via CB10
    Yeah and large portion of people on here use "security" as a buzz word for why using a Blackberry is important. Because Blackberry references security so often its constantly used as a reason why having a Blackberry is important by many on here, when their phone without BES is no more secure than any other one.

    Same with the Priv. Because Blackberry says its protecting your privacy with it (which it most certainly is not) people say "I'm using a Priv because I value my privacy," which is a complete joke. I own one myself, but I'm not under the illusion that my information is kept private from Google, because it isn't.
    03-30-16 06:49 PM
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