04-01-16 01:31 AM
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  1. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    The Mossad...! ;-D

    We knew it! (j/k)

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    03-28-16 07:42 PM
  2. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    I think if I was an iPhone user concerned with the security of my device I would rather that it was Apple that breached the security as opposed to a third party.

    Posted via CB10
    Kinda, yeah... not a healthy choice of options... :-D

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    03-28-16 07:42 PM
  3. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    The FBI says they were able to hack the phone. Until they provide details on the hack, or the contents of the phone, it's pretty safe to assume they're lying to save face. They dropped the case because they didn't want to set a precedent that was unfavorable to them.
    03-28-16 07:56 PM
  4. Crapshoot2010's Avatar
    Then I would expect that Apple will be calling their bluff very shortly.

    Posted via CB10
    03-28-16 08:01 PM
  5. sorinv's Avatar
    The Mossad...! ;-D

    We knew it! (j/k)

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    Maybe not. Now they are owned by the Japanese Sun Corporation.
    Among other things, they decrypt data stored in clouds and social media.
    All you need to do is to go to their home page and click on the Corporate link.
    Strangely enough, they advertise that they can decrypt all iphones and ipads. For a complete list of devices (I was curious to find out if BlackBerry was on the list) beyond Apple ones, you have to register with them...
    03-28-16 08:19 PM
  6. greenpoise's Avatar
    Any one phone can be forensically hacked. This doesn't really say much about any secutiry. Even a blackberry could be broken into. The issue here was never whether 1 phone could be hacked, it was about the legal ramifications of the government forcing apple to put back-doors in their software.
    Sorry if I sound contesting what you just wrote but apparently it was a vulnerability in the OS and not a forensic hack. So..

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    03-28-16 10:47 PM
  7. khlover520's Avatar
    There's a reason Hillary uses a BlackBerry for her emails

    Posted via CB10
    03-29-16 02:17 AM
  8. LOU LIZARD's Avatar
    John McAfee told the FBI that he could hack it in 3 weeks!... It's been 3 weeks now!

    S.F. GIANTS/ S.F. 49'ERS ON MY BLACKBERRY Q10/ POWERED BY SPRINT-U.S.A.!
    03-29-16 02:32 AM
  9. sorinv's Avatar
    John McAfee told the FBI that he could hack it in 3 weeks!... It's been 3 weeks now!

    S.F. GIANTS/ S.F. 49'ERS ON MY BLACKBERRY Q10/ POWERED BY SPRINT-U.S.A.!
    He didn't do it. A Japanese-owned Israeli company, Cellebrite, did it.
    03-29-16 03:29 AM
  10. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    https://community.spiceworks.com/top...t-pulls-ai-bot

    Have a read here. This is good timing for the FBI. And those exploits are just run-of-the-mill regular occurrences that "just need to be patched"... ;-D

    •   There's a Crack in the Berry right now...   •

    This attack seems to require a "crafted app", so it cannot be used to unlock this particular iPhone I guess.
    However, if one could smuggle such a "crafted app" into the appstore (which isn't that hard, we have already learned), it will "execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges" = game over.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT206166
    https://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/d...=CVE-2016-1757

    I stick to BB10, because I don't like such vulnerabilities, but after waiting two years for a PlayBook 2, I just have ordered an iPad, sigh, seems we all have to make compromises (no no, of course I am excited).
    03-29-16 03:58 AM
  11. bakron1's Avatar
    As I have said many times, anyone who thinks their smartphone is 100% secure is fooling nobody but themselves. With all the things happening in the world today and with governments using the scary "T" word more and more to exploit our individual and privacy rights without do process is the real security issue we face.
    web99 likes this.
    03-29-16 05:51 AM
  12. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    I can't stop laughing at this marketing failure *.
    Now apple wants to go in court to force FBI to explain them how they did it ...

    The FBI has now successfully retrieved the data stored on the San Bernardino terrorist's iPhone and therefore no longer requires the assistance from Apple required by the Court Order. The FBI is currently reviewing the information on the phone, consistent with standard investigatory procedures.
    Apple lawyers said last week that they did not know the technique the FBI was using and said that they would seek to force the FBI to reveal it.
    Source : Government withdrawing Apple iPhone case - Business Insider

    * marketing failure :
    Step 1 : BS it to the max while you know you're BS-ing it to the max
    Step 2 :
    raino, web99, buwee and 1 others like this.
    03-29-16 05:56 AM
  13. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    Yes this is bad for Apple and great for Blackberry.

    Anyone that thinks the FBI will get a hold of their phone... Is going to run out and buy a BlackBerry.
    + to make it even worse the market is expecting that BlackBerry will crush Apple in 2016.

    I am sure John Chen just got a call from a Tim Cook about the sales price.


    /s (just in case)
    03-29-16 07:18 AM
  14. raino's Avatar
    I can't stop laughing at this marketing failure *.
    Now apple wants to go in court to force FBI to explain them how they did it ...
    Perhaps a little ironic, given their recent, much fawned over "stand" about not being compelled to do something? Have their engineers threatened to quit already?

    Maybe the FBI should launch an ad campaign
    03-29-16 08:51 AM
  15. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    Iphone users don't care about security... it's all about apps and selfies.. lol


    Posted via CB10
    buwee likes this.
    03-29-16 09:20 AM
  16. MikeX74's Avatar
    Iphone users don't care about security... it's all about apps and selfies.. lol


    Posted via CB10
    Obvious silly generalizations are obvious.
    03-29-16 09:21 AM
  17. dpeters11's Avatar
    Keep in mind, it was an iPhone 5c, no touchID. iPhone security has increased since then with the security enclave. And what OS was it running?
    jallister likes this.
    03-29-16 09:48 AM
  18. MikeX74's Avatar
    Keep in mind, it was an iPhone 5c, no touchID. iPhone security has increased since then with the security enclave. And what OS was it running?
    Don't you know that using facts and common sense isn't allowed in this forum? For shame!
    Last edited by MikeX74; 03-29-16 at 11:06 AM.
    Eumaeus, TGR1, john_v and 2 others like this.
    03-29-16 10:11 AM
  19. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    Perhaps a little ironic, given their recent, much fawned over "stand" about not being compelled to do something? Have their engineers threatened to quit already?

    Maybe the FBI should launch an ad campaign
    The two things are not even remotely equivalent. They're so far apart that's it's incredible to conceive how you came to this thoroughly ridiculous conclusion.
    TGR1 likes this.
    03-29-16 10:34 AM
  20. Eumaeus's Avatar
    The FBI says they were able to hack the phone. Until they provide details on the hack, or the contents of the phone, it's pretty safe to assume they're lying to save face. They dropped the case because they didn't want to set a precedent that was unfavorable to them.
    This. If we are going to make up narratives contrary to what the NY Times and FBI claim, I think it is way more likely that the FBI abandoned their court case before setting a precedent opposite to the one they sought, and made up this story about cracking the phone so that court case will never be reopened.

    Apple has been very up front about all the help they did give the FBI.

    But, whatever... if they did take a 3-year-old phone, mirror its RAM, put it in a VM, and brute-force a 4-digit password, that says nothing either good or bad about current or future iPhones, and it certainly has zero bearing on anything to do with Blackberry, whether BB10 or Android.

    The scenarios proposed around the internet all assume that the bad-guy used a 4-digit numeric PIN... 10,000 possibilities max. If he used a 13-digit alphanumeric passcode, these approaches would take (on average) 12,000 years to crack. Source
    03-29-16 10:53 AM
  21. tipplex's Avatar
    We can all act like BlackBerry is more secure but the same company also hacks bbos7 and bb10 devices.

    Posted via CB10
    03-29-16 11:19 AM
  22. zocster's Avatar
    There's a reason Hillary uses a BlackBerry for her emails

    Posted via CB10
    http://forums.crackberry.com/news-ru...swell-1067994/ hmm I don't know
    03-29-16 11:34 AM
  23. zeeten's Avatar
    Keep in mind, it was an iPhone 5c, no touchID. iPhone security has increased since then with the security enclave. And what OS was it running?
    If there had been touchID on this phone, they would've had a much easier time... just dig up the body.

    Posted via CB10
    undone, Gallofa, raino and 3 others like this.
    03-29-16 11:35 AM
  24. undone's Avatar
    Bet it was an undisclosed (to apple) hack that allows them to by-pass security on the device. Apple is one of the few that doesn't have a bug bounty.
    03-29-16 01:39 PM
  25. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    We can all act like BlackBerry is more secure but the same company also hacks bbos7 and bb10 devices.

    Posted via CB10
    Didn't see any references to BB10 Devices... but I didn't look too hard.

    But over the last few years, there have been a number of BBOS "holes" found. Which just shows how important having an updated OS is......
    03-29-16 02:56 PM
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