05-07-12 01:53 PM
28 12
tools
  1. Rooster99's Avatar
    No brand new news here, but it's interesting to see that BlackBerry World is generating some positive press for RIM :

    NPD Group Blog Early Shades Of An Apple-Like Comeback

    - R.
    05-06-12 09:31 PM
  2. Stewartj1's Avatar
    Good press for RIM is news!

    Thanks for the link.
    Last edited by stewartj1; 05-06-12 at 09:41 PM.
    kemj and jordandrews90 like this.
    05-06-12 09:37 PM
  3. tjseaman's Avatar
    Nice to read some positive news! Thank you for sharing.
    05-06-12 09:56 PM
  4. Thunderbuck's Avatar
    It's all speculation until BB10 hits the market. But it's definitely a nice thought
    05-06-12 10:04 PM
  5. Bobcat665's Avatar
    Oh boy... How long before the iTrolls start jumping all over this one?
    TRlPPlN likes this.
    05-06-12 10:10 PM
  6. kemj's Avatar
    Oh boy... How long before the iTrolls start jumping all over this one?
    In 3...2...1..........
    05-06-12 10:47 PM
  7. playbookster's Avatar
    Maybe some analysts are starting to come around?
    05-06-12 10:51 PM
  8. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    At last ... someone's having care about products life cycles.
    The ixxx era is now 10 years (rounded) success, so that even a iPhone 5 release (unless there is a drastic change that we did not noticed ?) won't be anything but an update. Read me good, I do not mean that it won't be a success and it is very likely that most apple consumers will stay loyal and passionate to/by the brand.
    Android, on its side, has gone from "scratch new OS" to "mature OS" and will have to stand a bit on its current status to concreted both user experience and hardware consistency.

    Being it by chance ("a blessing in disguise") or on schedule, there's a real time window opportunity here.
    05-07-12 03:32 AM
  9. exfactor's Avatar
    But RIM isn't Apple....
    05-07-12 05:47 AM
  10. cgk's Avatar
    For RIM to come back would be very interesting as they would be the first faltering player in the mobile sector to ever manage it.

    Sent from my Lumia 800 using Board Express
    05-07-12 05:50 AM
  11. DrBit2011's Avatar
    But RIM isn't Apple....
    Of course not

    RIM dosnt need money like Apple need it early, or u dont know MS give to Apple a lot of dollars??
    05-07-12 06:01 AM
  12. Economist101's Avatar
    Of course not

    RIM dosnt need money like Apple need it early, or u dont know MS give to Apple a lot of dollars??
    As the old saying goes, you don't solve money problems with money. Without a winning strategy, the MS investment would have been useless.

    It's funny how many commenters spend much of their time drawing distinctions between RIM and Apple, yet they can't wait to tell us how alike they are when the issue of "comebacks" rolls around.
    05-07-12 06:56 AM
  13. morlock_man's Avatar
    As the old saying goes, you don't solve money problems with money. Without a winning strategy, the MS investment would have been useless.

    It's funny how many commenters spend much of their time drawing distinctions between RIM and Apple, yet they can't wait to tell us how alike they are when the issue of "comebacks" rolls around.
    Apple's winning strategy involved a complete redesign of their OS from the ground up using a modified version of the mach microkernel (that made it no longer micro).

    RIM is in the process of redesigning their OS from the ground up using an actual microkernel, which used the techniques developed for the L4 family of kernels to deal with the IPC problems inherent in the earlier versions of the Mach kernel.

    In this case the development of a next gen OS would be the common thread, except RIM has a leg up with the properly researched and developed microkernel, instead of the failed attempt that was made with Mach.
    05-07-12 07:06 AM
  14. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    (snip)
    It's funny how many commenters spend much of their time drawing distinctions between RIM and Apple, yet they can't wait to tell us how alike they are when the issue of "comebacks" rolls around.

    RIM is not Apple, the situations are completely different, and whats needed for a comeback is also completely different.

    RIM needs a solid way forward and BB10 does look to be this method. The OS is very clean looking and functions very well, from what we have seen. This is a major step for RIM. Its only the first in what they need though. Excellent software running on Excellent hardware, and a TRUE way to market it are whats needed.
    05-07-12 07:08 AM
  15. Economist101's Avatar
    Apple's winning strategy involved a complete redesign of their OS from the ground up using a modified version of the mach microkernel (that made it no longer micro).

    RIM is in the process of redesigning their OS from the ground up using an actual microkernel, which used the techniques developed for the L4 family of kernels to deal with the IPC problems inherent in the earlier versions of the Mach kernel.

    In this case the development of a next gen OS would be the common thread, except RIM has a leg up with the properly researched and developed microkernel, instead of the failed attempt that was made with Mach.
    Your explanation is incomplete. It wasn't the redesigned OS that did it, as market share in computers has never recovered. Apple's comeback hinged on pushing into new markets with successful, high margin products. There isn't a single $485 million write-down to be found. You can point to QNX in cars or whatever else, but there's no evidence that this is a high margin business, and at last check RIM's money comes mostly from hardware, not software or services.
    05-07-12 07:54 AM
  16. kbz1960's Avatar
    For RIM to come back would be very interesting as they would be the first faltering player in the mobile sector to ever manage it.

    Sent from my Lumia 800 using Board Express
    Do you think the same for MS sending from that lumia?
    05-07-12 07:59 AM
  17. Economist101's Avatar
    For RIM to come back would be very interesting as they would be the first faltering player in the mobile sector to ever manage it.

    Sent from my Lumia 800 using Board Express
    I think this is broader than it should be. It's not that companies in mobile don't rise after a fall, but rather that companies which fall off the lead generally don't get back to the lead.
    05-07-12 08:08 AM
  18. morlock_man's Avatar
    Your explanation is incomplete. It wasn't the redesigned OS that did it, as market share in computers has never recovered. Apple's comeback hinged on pushing into new markets with successful, high margin products. There isn't a single $485 million write-down to be found. You can point to QNX in cars or whatever else, but there's no evidence that this is a high margin business, and at last check RIM's money comes mostly from hardware, not software or services.
    Since they're not selling BB10 as a stand alone platform, I'm pretty sure they're still a hardware company. But their OS is designed to drive the hardware they sell more efficently.

    It's a matter of perspective. There are markets that QNX exists within that Apple will never touch. The possibility of systems upgrades with a new UI for the business-industrial complex is more of RIM's foundation than Apples. Aside from the BYOD trend, show me a single place where the iPhone or iPad has found a niche in industry outside of mass media...? I can't think of any, maybe you can.

    The current version of both iOS and OSX are last gen operating systems, built on old computer science. It's that simple.

    It's going to be replaced like MS ditched DOS and the Windows 9X kernel in favor of the NT kernel.

    It's like going from a combustion engine (Dos, 9X, MacOS) to a hybrid (NT & OS X version of Mach) to a high efficency electric motor driven by a super capacitor (BB10).

    New platforms enable new marketplaces.
    05-07-12 08:09 AM
  19. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Since they're not selling BB10 as a stand alone platform, I'm pretty sure they're still a hardware company. But their OS is designed to drive the hardware they sell more efficently.

    It's a matter of perspective. There are markets that QNX exists within that Apple will never touch. The possibility of systems upgrades with a new UI for the business-industrial complex is more of RIM's foundation than Apples. Aside from the BYOD trend, show me a single place where the iPhone or iPad has found a niche in industry outside of mass media...? I can't think of any, maybe you can.

    The current version of both iOS and OSX are last gen operating systems, built on old computer science. It's that simple.

    It's going to be replaced like MS ditched DOS and the Windows 9X kernel in favor of the NT kernel.

    It's like going from a combustion engine (Dos, 9X, MacOS) to a hybrid (NT & OS X version of Mach) to a high efficency electric motor driven by a super capacitor (BB10).

    New platforms enable new marketplaces.

    Are those markets profitable for RIM?
    05-07-12 08:17 AM
  20. Economist101's Avatar
    It's a matter of perspective. There are markets that QNX exists within that Apple will never touch. The possibility of systems upgrades with a new UI for the business-industrial complex is more of RIM's foundation than Apples. Aside from the BYOD trend, show me a single place where the iPhone or iPad has found a niche in industry outside of mass media...? I can't think of any, maybe you can.
    My point isn't that the iPhone/iPad have a broad reach, but rather that those products exist at all.
    05-07-12 08:33 AM
  21. morlock_man's Avatar
    Are those markets profitable for RIM?
    I'd say they were profitable for QNX, I don't see why they wouldn't be profitable for RIM. Not only that, but it'll be quite profitable for the 3rd-party app developers who've been given Cascades as means to develop the software that will be in demand for this marketplace.

    The military-industrial complex, healthcare system and nuclear power control systems aside, the industrial uses seem pretty extensive. Imagine entire factories with realtime monitoring of assembly or production lines from control rooms with beautifully updated UIs, powered by BB10 and Cascades. The ability to just pick up a Playbook and walk down a factory line, grabbing information from each machine to determine optimum operating characteristics, thanks to NFC and the distributed nature of the Neutrino microkernel.

    Picture any futuristic device you see in science fiction from the last few decades. Take Star Trek for example. Tricorders with touch interfaces, information tablets and ship-wide computers, all networked together seamlessly. That kind of integration requires the development of a platform beyond the simple monolithic kernels powering today's computing equipment. That's what BB10 represents to me, the computing foundation of the future.

    I'm excited, I won't deny it.
    05-07-12 08:37 AM
  22. Economist101's Avatar
    Are those markets profitable for RIM?
    Profitable, but insignificant, which is why RIM doesn't address QNX profits specifically in its earnings reports.
    05-07-12 08:44 AM
  23. Anon_M_Lee's Avatar
    Finally a recent positive article about RIM. This company has been in the mobile space for a long time now. They know what needs to be done to come back to prominence.

    Sent from my BlackBerry 9930 using Tapatalk
    05-07-12 08:45 AM
  24. cgk's Avatar
    Do you think the same for MS sending from that lumia?
    Do I think that WP7/8 can dominate or be the market leader? No, I don't think so - I use a Lumia because I got it for free (literally for free, not free on a contract). It's a really nice device but I don't see it taking over or Nokia coming back, I doubt Nokia will exist as an independent company in a few years. Companies come and go and unless you work for them or have stock in them it's nothing to get too worked up for.

    More broadly, I think this cycle of mobility is pretty much locked down as a two horse race between Android (or rather samsung) and Apple - BB10 might fight it out with WP for a distant third but I can't see either platform moving to second.
    05-07-12 09:17 AM
  25. cgk's Avatar
    I think this is broader than it should be. It's not that companies in mobile don't rise after a fall, but rather that companies which fall off the lead generally don't get back to the lead.

    Yes, I should have been more precise, once they falter, they don't come back to a position of leadership.
    05-07-12 09:18 AM
28 12
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD