01-28-14 03:28 PM
37 12
tools
  1. ArmedHitman's Avatar
    Well yes. This is partly why BlackBerry stays in the hardware business. Your previous point was about encryption so why seaway into hardware.


    Posted via CB10
    My point is anything and everything is hackable and crackable given enough time or/and creativity. It doesn't matter if the software is unpenetrable, the hardware is in 'our' hands.. I'm sure someone could come up with something at some point!

    Not saying or pissing on anyone's parade saying the BlackBerry OS isn't secure because I myself have sworn by it for more than 5 years. Just saying in this day and age anything is possible.

    Posted via CB10
    01-20-14 10:22 PM
  2. SCrid2000's Avatar
    I'm sure they'll find a way... They're very ruthless in there way of getting what they want. Seeing as the Elliptic Curve patents are owned by BlackBerry through a small firm they purchased called Certicom.. And I heard some EC's were flawed on purpose... Something very off is happening here...

    P.s Btw wouldn't GPU based data crunching have a bit of a speed boost? Cut a couple of million years off there CUDA!!! Plus CUDA farms are coming nVidia Quadro powered

    P.s.s I also think as chips are getting to there theoretical limit (As electricity doesn't like being pushed through tiny paths so they decide to jump around...) of being downsized... Layered wafers are coming Or 3D chips... would also have a little speed boost there too Technology moves at a alarming pace... imagine I'm rocking a Intel i7 2600k with 16GB of RAM and a RAID0 setup... I was the fastest 2 years back... Seeing the new chips they have over nearly double in computational power than my trusted 2600k... I so need a upgrade -_-.

    Posted via CB10
    Oh definitely, as some people here have already alluded to, new technologies will render our discussion here entirely obsolete. I chuckle at the idea of my 3 year old in 10 years laughing that we though of quantum computing as crazy fast and theoretical and graphics cards might help, but those are all being bought up by miners and put to much better use*

    My point is just that existing technology is insufficient to brute force some encryption types. That will, undoubtedly, change, and likely change soon. I know nothing about wafers, might have to look into that.

    *by better use I mean a colossal waste of time and energy, I still think bitcoin values are hyperinflated and will crash when people lose interest, but that's a whole different discussion.
    01-20-14 10:24 PM
  3. EdY's Avatar
    We can discuss cryptographic strengths and robustness of the math for academic reasons, but the truth is if the NSA wants to nail you they will find another easier way. Governments will and have taken people into custody and used non-cryptographic methods to squeeze out information from "wet-ware" (i.e. you) faster than "hard-ware" (i.e. your phone or laptop) if they suspect something. Or they will find your associate and make deals or pit you against the other person by lying to them and saying that the other person ratted on you to get a better deal. Anyways, by the time they have your phone in their labs and trying to crack it, or crack you, you are already in pretty deep doo-doo.

    We have TrueCrypt and other software available in the open-source world that people can download and very strongly protect their files. The cat has been let out of the bag... and keys can be made longer and longer if needed. Not sure about the legality in some places for whether you are allowed to use certain software or not, or export it to certain countries. But the source is available for rigorous mathematical and algorithmic scrutiny and people can build it and make it even more complex.

    The rest of the monitoring of internet and phone network packet filtering by NSA is likely to pick up important text keywords (or voice translation) out of background chatter on suspected bad guys to figure out their next moves to get a bust. I'm sure there are also GPS or network tower data to track movement of bad guys or associates, or to correlate to criminal activities in areas. It is all part of a data "cloud" the criminals surround themselves with and which NSA can use to discover trends or patterns. The average joe public is not exactly going to tip off the NSA or set off any alarms.

    We have more to fear from carriers and corporations than NSA, with software like Carrier IQ found to have been installed on many smartphones a few years ago and logging keystrokes and web-searches on your phone. No doubt it was the device manufacturers bending to the will of carriers who wanted to monitor the data usage and trends of their customers and forcing Carrier IQ software to be buried into the default OS preloaded on their devices.

    As to the security of BlackBerry, I am sure the Pentagon bought 80,000 BlackBerry's because they are such good environments to develop apps on, right? And not at all for security. I think not. While nothing is impenetrable, the bottom line is BlackBerry has built a robust and stable OS out of QNX, with powerful cryptographic algorithms and has a small enough user-base that hackers would much rather be interested and stand to profit from their efforts on iPhone and Android systems. There are jailbreaks on iOS and Android rootkits, but BlackBerry QNX has NONE. We know even the latest PlayBook OS has no rootkit since DingleBerry was stopped at an earlier version 2.0.

    And as to the ORIGINAL POST saying "society is not recommended"... BlackBerry is available to anyone who wishes to buy it, and they can have the same security as Obama. People do not care about security, or I should say they care more about certain apps and features than security. Corporations and government which want their employees to be productive on a limited number of apps, developed in-house, with central device management across their organization will be fine using BlackBerry and have both security and productivity for the task at hand.
    01-20-14 10:34 PM
  4. ArmedHitman's Avatar
    Oh definitely, as some people here have already alluded to, new technologies will render our discussion here entirely obsolete. I chuckle at the idea of my 3 year old in 10 years laughing that we though of quantum computing as crazy fast and theoretical and graphics cards might help, but those are all being bought up by miners and put to much better use*

    My point is just that existing technology is insufficient to brute force some encryption types. That will, undoubtedly, change, and likely change soon. I know nothing about wafers, might have to look into that.

    *by better use I mean a colossal waste of time and energy, I still think bitcoin values are hyperinflated and will crash when people lose interest, but that's a whole different discussion.
    I agree with brute forcing it would take ages... I see myself moving planets in the last days of my life... Thinking of Mars for retirement lool... But anyways like I said before brute forcing isn't the only way to get around it! Someone really clever or just plain stupid will think why didn't we just try this new thing and would crack it that way.

    And mining is a colossal waste of time and energy... I've always thought it was just a marketing ploy by AMD as they were loosing out by the ****load to nVidia... But yeah! Whole new topic there.. And sooner or later the miners will empty the mines and flood the market with ****loads of AMD graphics boards..

    Posted via CB10
    01-20-14 10:34 PM
  5. ArmedHitman's Avatar
    We can discuss cryptographic strengths and robustness of the math for academic reasons, but the truth is if the NSA wants to nail you they will find another easier way. Governments will and have taken people into custody and used non-cryptographic methods to squeeze out information from "wet-ware" (i.e. you) faster than "hard-ware" (i.e. your phone or laptop) if they suspect something. Or they will find your associate and make deals or pit you against the other person by lying to them and saying that the other person ratted on you to get a better deal. Anyways, by the time they have your phone in their labs and trying to crack it, or crack you, you are already in pretty deep doo-doo.

    We have TrueCrypt and other software available in the open-source world that people can download and very strongly protect their files. The cat has been let out of the bag... and keys can be made longer and longer if needed. Not sure about the legality in some places for whether you are allowed to use certain software or not, or export it to certain countries. But the source is available for rigorous mathematical and algorithmic scrutiny and people can build it and make it even more complex.

    The rest of the monitoring of internet and phone network packet filtering by NSA is likely to pick up important text keywords (or voice translation) out of background chatter on suspected bad guys to figure out their next moves to get a bust. I'm sure there are also GPS or network tower data to track movement of bad guys or associates, or to correlate to criminal activities in areas. It is all part of a data "cloud" the criminals surround themselves with and which NSA can use to discover trends or patterns. The average joe public is not exactly going to tip off the NSA or set off any alarms.

    We have more to fear from carriers and corporations than NSA, with software like Carrier IQ found to have been installed on many smartphones a few years ago and logging keystrokes and web-searches on your phone. No doubt it was the device manufacturers bending to the will of carriers who wanted to monitor the data usage and trends of their customers and forcing Carrier IQ software to be buried into the default OS preloaded on their devices.

    As to the security of BlackBerry, I am sure the Pentagon bought 80,000 BlackBerry's because they are such good environments to develop apps on, right? And not at all for security. I think not. While nothing is impenetrable, the bottom line is BlackBerry has built a robust and stable OS out of QNX, with powerful cryptographic algorithms and has a small enough user-base that hackers would much rather be interested and stand to profit from their efforts on iPhone and Android systems. There are jailbreaks on iOS and Android rootkits, but BlackBerry QNX has NONE. We know even the latest PlayBook OS has no rootkit since DingleBerry was stopped at an earlier version 2.0.

    And as to the ORIGINAL POST saying "society is not recommended"... BlackBerry is available to anyone who wishes to buy it, and they can have the same security as Obama. People do not care about security, or I should say they care more about certain apps and features than security. Corporations and government which want their employees to be productive on a limited number of apps, developed in-house, with central device management across their organization will be fine using BlackBerry and have both security and productivity for the task at hand.
    I agree with your points you made my night time reading a joy by posting so much.. Nearly 5am! But yeah agreed... I'm sure a water board or two will give them your BlackBerry code :|

    And yup there was a law that makes super strong encryption illegal in some countries in the eyes of the USA. Not sure if it's still enforced or even used but yeah probably is and we don't know! Like our governments tell us anything!!!

    And you talking of QNX like that makes me think we're the Linux of the mobile world...

    And I'm sure the Pentagon doesn't mind the NSA having a peek at there files... Same government just different letters

    Posted via CB10
    01-20-14 10:42 PM
  6. THBW's Avatar
    We can discuss cryptographic strengths and robustness of the math for academic reasons, but the truth is if the NSA wants to nail you they will find another easier way. Governments will and have taken people into custody and used non-cryptographic methods to squeeze out information from "wet-ware" (i.e. you) faster than "hard-ware" (i.e. your phone or laptop) if they suspect something. Or they will find your associate and make deals or pit you against the other person by lying to them and saying that the other person ratted on you to get a better deal. Anyways, by the time they have your phone in their labs and trying to crack it, or crack you, you are already in pretty deep doo-doo.

    We have TrueCrypt and other software available in the open-source world that people can download and very strongly protect their files. The cat has been let out of the bag... and keys can be made longer and longer if needed. Not sure about the legality in some places for whether you are allowed to use certain software or not, or export it to certain countries. But the source is available for rigorous mathematical and algorithmic scrutiny and people can build it and make it even more complex.

    The rest of the monitoring of internet and phone network packet filtering by NSA is likely to pick up important text keywords (or voice translation) out of background chatter on suspected bad guys to figure out their next moves to get a bust. I'm sure there are also GPS or network tower data to track movement of bad guys or associates, or to correlate to criminal activities in areas. It is all part of a data "cloud" the criminals surround themselves with and which NSA can use to discover trends or patterns. The average joe public is not exactly going to tip off the NSA or set off any alarms.

    We have more to fear from carriers and corporations than NSA, with software like Carrier IQ found to have been installed on many smartphones a few years ago and logging keystrokes and web-searches on your phone. No doubt it was the device manufacturers bending to the will of carriers who wanted to monitor the data usage and trends of their customers and forcing Carrier IQ software to be buried into the default OS preloaded on their devices.

    As to the security of BlackBerry, I am sure the Pentagon bought 80,000 BlackBerry's because they are such good environments to develop apps on, right? And not at all for security. I think not. While nothing is impenetrable, the bottom line is BlackBerry has built a robust and stable OS out of QNX, with powerful cryptographic algorithms and has a small enough user-base that hackers would much rather be interested and stand to profit from their efforts on iPhone and Android systems. There are jailbreaks on iOS and Android rootkits, but BlackBerry QNX has NONE. We know even the latest PlayBook OS has no rootkit since DingleBerry was stopped at an earlier version 2.0.

    And as to the ORIGINAL POST saying "society is not recommended"... BlackBerry is available to anyone who wishes to buy it, and they can have the same security as Obama. People do not care about security, or I should say they care more about certain apps and features than security. Corporations and government which want their employees to be productive on a limited number of apps, developed in-house, with central device management across their organization will be fine using BlackBerry and have both security and productivity for the task at hand.
    Thanks for a logical and enjoyable read. There was just a bit too much paranoia going on in this thread.

    Posted via CB10
    01-20-14 10:59 PM
  7. xBURK's Avatar
    My wife's Aunts husband used to work for Canada's QNX years ago. Back then they had a challenge that was never meet. If someone could hack QNX, they would receive $100,000. Not sure if that challenge would be any easier today, but I doubt it.

    Posted via CB10
    01-21-14 12:05 AM
  8. guygardner73's Avatar
    Obama is a good president imo

    Posted via CB10
    Ben and Jerry's Phish food is an excellent ice cream imo

    Z10STL100-2/10.2.1.1925 O2 UK
    01-21-14 12:19 AM
  9. BBUniq01's Avatar
    You are a hopeless hacker to be if you cannot decipher OP's message.
    lol
    I know right. Lol.

    BB Uniq BB Bold -Z10 with 1925
    01-27-14 05:12 PM
  10. Omnitech's Avatar
    Oh look, another one of these threads.

    The primary reason that the POTUS cannot use an iPhone is because the govt security tools and add-ons for a consumer-type smartphone that have the highest level of proven and certified security are designed to work with Blackberries. In fact, legacy Blackberries, not BB10 devices. (Though that is in the process of changing)

    And remember that Obama does not use the Blackberry for classified material, it is for things like talking to his friends and family. For classified data, there is a clunky $5000 device from General Dynamics that might be used.

    (But when you are the President of the USA, the likelihood of needing such a thing personally is slim - you are always surrounded by aides and cabinet members and Secret Service staff etc. who have various ways of facilitating presidential communications.)
    01-27-14 06:40 PM
  11. aha's Avatar
    I think he is allowed to use iPhone, but choose not to.

    Posted via CB10 with Z30 on 10.2.1.1925+1926 radio
    01-27-14 07:15 PM
  12. Omnitech's Avatar
    I think he is allowed to use iPhone, but choose not to.

    He has specifically stated that it is not permitted. And it is not. iOS does not have the required security tools and certifications.
    01-28-14 03:28 PM
37 12

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