1. boobah204's Avatar
    alright so I googled and wikipedia's answer was too smart for me to understand, and the news says Sprint is offering 4G in Atlanta, T-Mobile will roll it out in Phillie, Verizon in Boston and somewhere else, etc.....

    Is this the same as LTE? What does 4G mean (besides 4th gen)? And is it hardware specific? or will LTE be hardware specific?

    Can someone dumb it down for me please?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 06:12 PM
  2. JoeyMoose's Avatar
    4G, an acronym for fourth-generation wireless, is a technology that will transform wireless communications in a completely new way. It is also known as “beyond 3G," since it provides a comprehensive and secure IP (Internet Protocol) solution. Users will enjoy high quality streaming video and "anytime, anywhere" voice and data at a much higher speed than previous generations.
    09-23-09 06:14 PM
  3. JoeyMoose's Avatar
    The “anytime, anywhere” solution of 4G technology is also referred to as “MAGIC,” which is an abbreviation for mobile multimedia; anytime/anywhere; global mobility support; integrated wireless solution; and customized personal services. The fourth-generation wireless technology will provide a wide variety of new services including HD video (high definition video), and high quality voice and high-data-rate wireless channels. 4G technology will not only be used for cellular telephone systems, but will also include several types of wireless broadband access communication systems.

    With a higher data rate and broader bandwidth capability, 4G technology will focus on providing seamless service across a multitude of wireless networks and systems. The core technologies employed by fourth-generation wireless may include OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing), SDR (Software-Defined Radio) receivers, OFDMA (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access) UTMS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System), and MIMO (multiple input/multiple output technologies). All these technologies will ensure high rates of data transmissions.

    The 4G working group has defined several objectives of the fourth-generation wireless communication standard. This includes: a high data rate of 100 Mbps between any two points in the world, seamless connectivity allowing users to enjoy global roaming across multiple networks, and support for high quality multimedia.

    The fourth-generation will interoperate with third generation systems as well as with broadband broadcasting systems. It also intends to integrate FWA (fixed wireless access, WLAN (wireless local area network), WLL (wireless local loop and PAN (personal area network), to provide fully IP-based wireless internet.

    There are various plans of implementing fourth-generation wireless. NTT DoCoMo, a Japanese company, is set to release their first 4G network in 2010. Currently, it is analyzing 4G wireless communications at 1 GBps while stationary and 100 MBps for mobile phone users. Some analysts expect an announcement of a faster 4G network using WiMax by Sprint« Nextel, which plans to expand its markets in 2009 and cover over 80 cities by the end of 2010.

    Fourth-generation technology, when fully implemented, will create new markets and opportunities for new and established telecommunication enterprises. A 4G network, combined with cell phones equipped with advanced HD capabilities or high quality digital cameras, will open the gates of video blogging on mobile phones.
    09-23-09 06:15 PM
  4. 360Challenge's Avatar
    LTE is 4G. It is the next generation of UMTS technology. Most CDMA providers in North America will be adding this technology to their network, providing CDMA and LTE crossover. LTE is capable of 100 mbps downlink speeds. LTE is based on an all-IP network.
    09-23-09 06:17 PM
  5. JoeyMoose's Avatar
    4g is only available in a few places as of now........
    09-23-09 06:21 PM
  6. Dr.Sadistic's Avatar
    Maybe this was answered in Mr. Moose's speech, but it is hardware based? Will we need a new phone to access this network and its capabilities?
    09-23-09 06:27 PM
  7. boobah204's Avatar
    okay I think I got that, (maybe) so an all IP network differs how exactly from the way networks are currently constructed?

    And does this still use radio bands? If LTE will mean no more cdma or gsm, what is exactly the wireless portion? How does it travel through the air, and at what frequency?

    And again, does hardware have to be specifically built for it?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 06:28 PM
  8. JoeyMoose's Avatar
    Maybe this was answered in Mr. Moose's speech, but it is hardware based? Will we need a new phone to access this network and its capabilities?

    The other day i was bored and i walked into a Sprint store and the Rep was trying to sell me a Tour for $199 (It's $149 at Verizon) and he said it is able to run on Sprint's 4g network. Then he said it's not available in the Detroit area yet.
    09-23-09 06:32 PM
  9. sunNsnow's Avatar
    okay I think I got that, (maybe) so an all IP network differs how exactly from the way networks are currently constructed?

    And does this still use radio bands? If LTE will mean no more cdma or gsm, what is exactly the wireless portion? How does it travel through the air, and at what frequency?

    And again, does hardware have to be specifically built for it?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I believe Verizon is using the recently purchased 700 MHz block C and AT&T purchased the 700 Mhz block B (info from wiki on 3GPP Long Term Evolution). What that means in English -- I think since I'm not an engineer -- those blocks are radio frequencies that the phones are permitted to use by the FCC. So, yes, LTE phones will be using radio frequencies.
    09-23-09 06:34 PM
  10. boobah204's Avatar
    The other day i was bored and i walked into a Sprint store and the Rep was trying to sell me a Tour for $199 (It's $149 at Verizon) and he said it is able to run on Sprint's 4g network. Then he said it's not available in the Detroit area yet.
    I live in Atlanta so I could get a Sprint Tour that runs on 4G but if a salesman is dumb enough to tell you that how does he know the Tour is actually capable of 4G?

    And what's the difference between 4G and HSPBA (I think those are the right letters) that AT&T is rolling out but only the iphone 3Gs is capable of?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 06:38 PM
  11. JoeyMoose's Avatar
    Lets not get started on Sales Reps...
    09-23-09 06:57 PM
  12. Dr.Sadistic's Avatar
    The other day i was bored and i walked into a Sprint store and the Rep was trying to sell me a Tour for $199 (It's $149 at Verizon) and he said it is able to run on Sprint's 4g network. Then he said it's not available in the Detroit area yet.
    That's good. I wont have to buy a new phone then.
    09-23-09 08:44 PM
  13. JoeyMoose's Avatar
    I would guess that the most we would have to do is use a certain or new OS. Just a guess.
    09-23-09 08:46 PM
  14. smnc's Avatar
    LTE is 4G. It is the next generation of UMTS technology. Most CDMA providers in North America will be adding this technology to their network, providing CDMA and LTE crossover. LTE is capable of 100 mbps downlink speeds. LTE is based on an all-IP network.
    LTE (or more properly 3GPP LTE) is not the only 4G technology. WiMax and HC-SDMA are the other two competitors. That said, I think almost every major network in the world has signed on to LTE, so it will probably be the dominant standard.

    Maybe this was answered in Mr. Moose's speech, but it is hardware based? Will we need a new phone to access this network and its capabilities?
    Yes, you will need a new phone. LTE relies on something called E-UTRA, and is NOT backwards compatible with older UMTS systems. LTE is a completely new network.
    And no, there are no LTE phones yet (afaik).

    okay I think I got that, (maybe) so an all IP network differs how exactly from the way networks are currently constructed?
    Yes. The underlying radio technology is not so different from what we use now. However, all data will be transmitted as IP packets. Think of it as the difference between a regular phone and VOIP. That's not a completely accurate analogy, but it should give you the general idea.
    And does this still use radio bands? If LTE will mean no more cdma or gsm, what is exactly the wireless portion? How does it travel through the air, and at what frequency?
    Technically LTE is part of the GSM/3GPP specification so strictly speaking GSM will still exist.
    But yes, it will eventually replace all existing networks. In the meantime, LTE is designed to be able to do seamless hand-offs to all existing 2G/3G network types.
    It will use a large variety of frequencies, basically all the same ones currently used by CDMA and GSM networks. The air transport used is E-UTRA, which is Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access. Basically it's an upgrade path for existing GSM/UTMS networks which use UTRAN (UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access Network).

    And again, does hardware have to be specifically built for it?
    Yep. Look above to my reply to Dr.Sadistic.

    I live in Atlanta so I could get a Sprint Tour that runs on 4G but if a salesman is dumb enough to tell you that how does he know the Tour is actually capable of 4G?
    Yeah, don't listen to the ***** salesmen. AFAIK, there are NO LTE phones in production yet.

    And what's the difference between 4G and HSPBA (I think those are the right letters) that AT&T is rolling out but only the iphone 3Gs is capable of?
    You mean HSDPA (High-Speed Downlink Packet Access). HSDPA is a bolt-on upgrade to UMTS that allows speeds UP TO 21Mbit (most HSDPA networks run at 7 or 14Mbit).
    the iPhone is far from the only device that can use HSDPA. The BlackBerry Bold for starters, not to mention the HTC Android phones, and MANY, MANY more.
    As for the differences between UTMS/HSDPA and LTE, look up to my reply to boobah204.
    Basically it's a new network, it needs a new phone, and goes MUCH faster.

    That's good. I wont have to buy a new phone then.
    Sorry, yes you will...

    I would guess that the most we would have to do is use a certain or new OS. Just a guess.
    Nope, needs a whole new chipset, sorry.
    09-23-09 10:43 PM
  15. boobah204's Avatar
    Thank you, for your informative and understandable answer!

    So now I know that as Sprint advertises their 4G network in Atlanta (which they are), it's at the moment useless to any consumer that might be swayed by it.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 11:44 PM
  16. smnc's Avatar
    Yup, that's about the size of it.

    Samsung and LG are supposed to have phones out next year, possibly late Q1 or early Q2.
    09-23-09 11:56 PM
  17. o0stryxs0o's Avatar
    No sprint phones use their 4G yet, but their MiFi reciever does! Its basically a portable wifi system for compter and phones that use wifi. It runs on their 4G system in the selected cities.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-24-09 03:13 AM
  18. smnc's Avatar
    Sorry, but no. MiFi is branding for a 3G based mobile broadband. It uses Ev-DO revision A. with a maximum throughput of 3.1Mbit down and 1.8Mbit up.

    You might be thinking of Sprint/Clearwire's WiMax network and portable broadband routers.
    Yes, they are available now, and allow high speed internet access. However, WiMax is targeted at wireless internet access for business use, and it is becoming increasingly unlikely that we will ever see any WiMax based phones in any real quantity.
    09-24-09 10:51 AM
  19. o0stryxs0o's Avatar
    The Sprint 3G/4G U300 allows people to access there 3G network and their faster 4G WiMax network via computer. Here where I live the also offer another mobile wifi network that works off of their 3G/4G network. Its a mobiie router, that basically sends out a short range wifi signal but uses the 3G/4G as an access. You may not have it in your area because sometimes these things differ from city to city depending upon whether or not you have coverage in your area but we have them here.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-24-09 11:08 AM
  20. smnc's Avatar
    Yes, you just agreed with me. Sort of.
    MiFi is a CDMA/Ev-DO modem with a wireless router built in.
    It allows you to access 3G broadband from your computer. MiFi is intended as a consumer product, and is designed and marketed as such.

    Sprint also has a 4G WiMax network available in some cities (via Clearwire). Sprint sells a Business-class mobile broadband solution to access it. It is similar to MiFi, in that it is essentially a 3G/4G modem with a wireless router attached.
    However Sprint considers this a business service, and it is built and marketed as such.

    I have neither, as I live in Canada and we do not have Sprint or WiMax. However we are scheduled to begin LTE roll-out prior to the Winter Olympics.
    09-24-09 11:44 AM
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