05-18-16 10:20 AM
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  1. Emaderton3's Avatar
    None of those know what the others collect and their business model is not to monetize the data you give them in order to validate your transactions.
    The health insurance company and the doctor would be breaking the law if they released your health data to others without your consent.

    Google knows everything those banks, stores, insurance companies etc. collect from you and they can aggregate that data with your searches, Google account if you have one, and all the data on your phone if you have android.

    That type of data collection from your store, public transport company, etc. can be easily avoided by paying in cash or with anonymous cards if there is a WILL from the governmnet to do so and safeguard the privacy of its citizens.

    For example, in Japan and in Sydney, they use anonymous electronic cards for public transport. You can deposit cash on a card at any grocery store or at a public kiosk without having to identify yourself.


    Data collection is against Canadian law, but it becomes legal once you click on the agree button.

    There is a reason why privacy laws exist. A company should not provide you with only the option to grant it permission to break that law.
    How does Google know the data insurance has if you just said it is illegal?

    Posted via CB10
    01-27-16 07:49 PM
  2. sorinv's Avatar
    How does Google know the data insurance has if you just said it is illegal?

    Posted via CB10
    At the very least from people and friends of people like those here who say they don't care about security or are not aware of the implications.
    People are ultimately the weakest link.
    Even the NSA could not protect its data from an internal employee leaking it to the world.

    But I think this discussion is going nowhere now.
    Just last week it was revealed that Google payed Apple 1B to make sure its search comes pre-installed on all iphones.
    Obviously data mining is important for Google and somehow they found a way of bullying even apple into acceptance.
    Most banks have android apps for users...Google can access that data...
    01-27-16 10:58 PM
  3. paulbbp's Avatar
    Anyone afraid of Google analytics should not use the Web. It reaches so much further than Android.

    Government concerns.... Anyone believing that simply using BB10 protects them is sadly deceived.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android on Priv.
    01-27-16 11:57 PM
  4. R3d13's Avatar
    I use an Android Permission manager app on BB10, and it logs which permissions are actually used. You will find that most of them never are.
    Hi conite, which app is it?
    Alain_A likes this.
    01-28-16 02:13 AM
  5. ddamayanti's Avatar
    What should disturb you clearly isn't so I highly doubt those statements mean much. Oversight is needed and to be implemented. Funny you should bring up Berlin.

    Posted via CB10
    What I mean is, an independent body which oversee the internet AND also have the means and the power to punish perpetrators is disturbingly, and overwhelmingly, powerful ... maybe even more, more powerful than the Googles or the Facebooks today ... and who can guarantee that it won't abuse its position of power ? ... I brought up Berlin, in 1930-1940 decade, because such "independent body" reminds me of certain power of that era, who have such power (within the boundaries of their influence) that they can choose which knowledge/information is forbidden, and proceed to destroy said knowledge (by burning books which contain said knowledge/information) ... IMO agreed that something must be done to put proper limits and transparency for internet corporations such as Google, Facebook, Apple etc (including Blackberry) ... but not by setting up an organization that function as the Supervisor/Overseer, Police, Judge, and Executioner at once. Thanks, and apologize for my broken English and also if my references above offended anyone at all.
    TgeekB likes this.
    01-28-16 02:36 AM
  6. ddamayanti's Avatar
    Google achieves AI 'breakthrough' by beating Go champion - BBC News

    Google is now one step closer.
    This is the reason why the relationship between users and Google is so asymmetrical and Google is far more powerful than your Power company, or your bank, or even your government.
    The more data you feed it, the more powerful it becomes.
    My reply here might be out-of-topic, however thanks for the link ! ... the ancient game of Go fascinated me since I tried a free Go game years ago that I download somewhere in the internet (it wasn't a very good program), and of course because of the manga/anime "Hikaru No Go". I did not aware of the news until read your link above. Surprised that somebody can figure out how to program a computer to be a good enough Go player to match a good human player. Btw there is some slight inaccuracies in the BBC article.
    01-28-16 02:46 AM
  7. Emaderton3's Avatar
    At the very least from people and friends of people like those here who say they don't care about security or are not aware of the implications.
    People are ultimately the weakest link.
    Even the NSA could not protect its data from an internal employee leaking it to the world.

    But I think this discussion is going nowhere now.
    Just last week it was revealed that Google payed Apple 1B to make sure its search comes pre-installed on all iphones.
    Obviously data mining is important for Google and somehow they found a way of bullying even apple into acceptance.
    Most banks have android apps for users...Google can access that data...
    But again, I would like to know what evidence exists that Google has my health insurance, bank, mortgage, etc. information? And even if an app uses Google services, it doesn't mean they are given access to the content. You really think a bank app is giving Google the actual dollar value and withdrawal history to Google?

    Posted via CB10
    01-28-16 06:07 AM
  8. sorinv's Avatar
    But again, I would like to know what evidence exists that Google has my health insurance, bank, mortgage, etc. information? And even if an app uses Google services, it doesn't mean they are given access to the content. You really think a bank app is giving Google the actual dollar value and withdrawal history to Google?

    Posted via CB10
    I think that the OS manufacturer can find everything about everything on your device: laptop, cellphone or tablet, if they so desire (unless, maybe behind a company firewall)
    With the current terrorism paranoia, most governments are quite happy to know that they can get to that info if they so desire. Especially since they do not need to invest in getting the infrastructure set up to do so themselves.
    This is likely one of the reasons why they do not enforce the EXISTING privacy rules.

    I don't have proof, I am not in that business, but we know ofseveral deals, like the one between Apple and Google revealed last week.

    Banks are already scared of Apple and Google eating into their business with apple and Google pay.
    But irrespective if they have deals or not, on a standard android phone, Google can do whatever.
    There is a reason why BlackBerry does not say anything about privacy from Google datamining on the Priv. That question was vigorously avoided by all BlackBerry interviewees at all times.
    lift likes this.
    01-28-16 06:21 AM
  9. conite's Avatar
    Hi conite, which app is it?
    http://www.androidauthority.com/andr...how-to-249538/
    01-28-16 06:30 AM
  10. R3d13's Avatar
    Oh, App Ops. I forgot that you can use that to see when permissions were last accessed.

    The feature that is lacking in App Ops (and perhaps Marshmallow's permission settings as well) is the ability to view and toggle ALL permissions listed within the APK's manifest XML file, and not just the basic Location/Contacts/etc permissions. If you look at the manifest, there's a lot more going on.

    Thanks for the link
    lift likes this.
    01-28-16 06:45 AM
  11. lift's Avatar
    Anyone afraid of Google analytics should not use the Web. It reaches so much further than Android.

    Government concerns.... Anyone believing that simply using BB10 protects them is sadly deceived.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android on Priv.
    Google analytics can easily be blocked with browser plugins that adblock and block trackers. Again, If you know what you are doing, there are plenty of ways to reduce or eliminate Google from your online experience. To simply say that "Google is everywhere and just live with it" is exactly the kind of response and line of thinking Google wants. Enjoy your tracked and data mined life. You seem to like it and just accept it. I don't.
    01-28-16 11:18 AM
  12. Emaderton3's Avatar
    Google analytics can easily be blocked with browser plugins that adblock and block trackers. Again, If you know what you are doing, there are plenty of ways to reduce or eliminate Google from your online experience. To simply say that "Google is everywhere and just live with it" is exactly the kind of response and line of thinking Google wants. Enjoy your tracked and data mined life. You seem to like it and just accept it. I don't.
    And today is Data Privacy Day!

    Posted via CB10
    01-28-16 03:47 PM
  13. Omahahaha's Avatar
    Except, of course, that with all of these services, there are tools available to limit the data you give to those companies.
    Can you elaborate? I cancel most of the Android App installs I decide to try because I can't restrict permissions like on most apps from BB App World.
    01-29-16 07:20 AM
  14. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Can you elaborate? I cancel most of the Android App installs I decide to try because I can't restrict permissions like on most apps from BB App World.
    I was referring to Google's own apps/services, for which there are lots of privacy controls available.

    Apps are another matter, but with Marshmallow rolling out to many current phones and virtually all new ones, that's going to be a thing of the past, as app permissions are built into the OS.
    Last edited by Troy Tiscareno; 01-29-16 at 05:26 PM.
    01-29-16 11:41 AM
  15. early2bed's Avatar
    Apps are another matter, but with Marshmallow rolling out to many current phones and virtually all new ones, that's going to be a thing of the past, as app permissions will are built into the OS.
    If Android Marshmallow phones come with app permissions built in to the OS (where it belongs) then is there any point in looking to BlackBerry Priv software to do this?
    01-29-16 12:14 PM
  16. conite's Avatar
    If Android Marshmallow phones come with app permissions built in to the OS (where it belongs) then is there any point in looking to BlackBerry Priv software to do this?
    Priv is about keyboard and "hardware root of trust". I don't think DTek means much to enterprise.

    Although that said, DTek can still be useful for letting you know if a permission you HAVE granted is used at a strange time or for a weird reason.
    01-29-16 12:19 PM
  17. Alain_A's Avatar
    Priv is about keyboard and "hardware root of trust". I don't think DTek means much to enterprise.

    Although that said, DTek can still be useful for letting you know if a permission you HAVE granted is used at a strange time or for a weird reason.
    By then it might be too late. It need to do the job before
    01-29-16 01:56 PM
  18. conite's Avatar
    By then it might be too late. It need to do the job before
    It's still very useful despite that. You can be immediately notified of the access, and choose to delete the app right away - thus preventing the next one hundred violations. A very big step in the right direction, which will hopefully improve as time goes on.
    01-29-16 02:00 PM
  19. MrScotian's Avatar
    It's great. Google Photo allows you to quickly select whatever photo(s) or video(s) you want from your collection and its will create an album with a hyperlink that you can send to whoever you want without worrying about eating up their cellular bandwidth if they would rather wait until they have wifi or running up against email size limits.

    And, no I don't mind Google being able to theoretically watch them. In the days of real photographs and Super 8 videos, the photo lab technicians from who knows where would definitely be going through each of your images to check for quality. I'm fairly sure nobody at Google is routinely going through my photos and videos.
    I'm still going with my worst reason ever response I gave earlier. The photo guy never had the chance to divulge those photos to thousands or millions at the touch of a button. Neither were they stored online where they are one hack away from being public knowledge. Sorry, just can't see how this makes any sense from a privacy standpoint when what you get in return is no assurance of safety and a hyperlink.
    01-29-16 05:57 PM
  20. early2bed's Avatar
    I'm still going with my worst reason ever response I gave earlier. The photo guy never had the chance to divulge those photos to thousands or millions at the touch of a button. Neither were they stored online where they are one hack away from being public knowledge. Sorry, just can't see how this makes any sense from a privacy standpoint when what you get in return is no assurance of safety and a hyperlink.
    From a privacy standpoint, one can store photos and other media on devices that are locked down and proceed with the assumption that they will always stay private. I'm not sure how you do that if you plan to routinely send media to someone else who can and will do whatever they wish with them including posting them on their Facebook or whatever.

    Or, you can operate on the assumption that none of your media will absolutely always remain private. So, if you capture something that you aren't 100% comfortable with then you immediately delete it or at least store it in a secure place - most importantly, not with all of your other media. Which method is safer?

    Recently, I found some old home videos from more than 10 years ago that I had backed up to a CD ROM and stashed somewhere. They were of my kids and taken on the first generations of smartphones - a Palm OS Sony Clie believe it or not. I thought I had lost them for good because the format was unreadable somewhere along the way and they were originally backed up on a zip drive. The first thing I did when I found them was to make sure that they all were uploaded to Google Photo and sent a few links to people who could enjoy them.

    I couldn't care less who else sees them as long as Google helps to make sure I never lose them again. To me, they are priceless.
    TgeekB likes this.
    01-29-16 06:21 PM
  21. TgeekB's Avatar
    From a privacy standpoint, one can store photos and other media on devices that are locked down and proceed with the assumption that they will always stay private. I'm not sure how you do that if you plan to routinely send media to someone else who can and will do whatever they wish with them including posting them on their Facebook or whatever.

    Or, you can operate on the assumption that none of your media will absolutely always remain private. So, if you capture something that you aren't 100% comfortable with then you immediately delete it or at least store it in a secure place - most importantly, not with all of your other media. Which method is safer?

    Recently, I found some old home videos from more than 10 years ago that I had backed up to a CD ROM and stashed somewhere. They were of my kids and taken on the first generations of smartphones - a Palm OS Sony Clie believe it or not. I thought I had lost them for good because the format was unreadable somewhere along the way and they were originally backed up on a zip drive. The first thing I did when I found them was to make sure that they all were uploaded to Google Photo and sent a few links to people who could enjoy them.

    I couldn't care less who else sees them as long as Google helps to make sure I never lose them again. To me, they are priceless.
    I fully understand. I'm not sure what this "privacy" fear has to do with pictures. Don't we all walk among others in public? We go to work, the mall, school. Is that giving up our privacy? Should I hide at home?
    01-29-16 06:52 PM
  22. BB_PP's Avatar
    I was referring to Google's own apps/services, for which there are lots of privacy controls available.

    Apps are another matter, but with Marshmallow rolling out to many current phones and virtually all new ones, that's going to be a thing of the past, as app permissions are built into the OS.
    You shall see Mashmallow and decide! Not much difference than 🍭. When you try to restrict it will you message that "Google services will not work"

    Posted via Priv...
    01-30-16 10:15 AM
  23. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    I fully understand. I'm not sure what this "privacy" fear has to do with pictures. Don't we all walk among others in public? We go to work, the mall, school. Is that giving up our privacy? Should I hide at home?
    Should we continue to be ambivalent and cavalier as you are ??

    Posted via CB10
    01-30-16 10:33 AM
  24. TgeekB's Avatar
    Should we continue to be ambivalent and cavalier as you are ??

    Posted via CB10
    Depends how important "things" are to you. Be as secretive as you want.
    01-30-16 10:34 AM
  25. sorinv's Avatar
    I fully understand. I'm not sure what this "privacy" fear has to do with pictures. Don't we all walk among others in public? We go to work, the mall, school. Is that giving up our privacy? Should I hide at home?
    With that kind of logic, why should any company keep anything secret?
    Why should they not give out all their IP for free and become charities?
    Why should any government keep anything secret?
    Why should there be any secret ballots?
    Why does Google have secret deals with Apple?
    Why doesn't Google publish their search algorithms for all to see and modify?
    Why doesn't Google make Play services and their code available to all OS-s for free if privacy and secrecy are not necessary?
    In the 21st century, we are all creators of content and IP.
    We are all corporations if we need to earn our living, we have IP to sell that needs to be protected.
    Obviously Google thinks our IP is worth datamining.
    01-30-16 02:58 PM
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