10-17-15 06:42 AM
46 12
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  1. mulderlr's Avatar
    So, let me get this straight... BlackBerry that had BIS for push email from the start that other smartphone users loathed, have now all come full circle and are providing push services from their own cloud servers to try and extend battery life which BlackBerry has always done pretty well? Apple iCloud and Google cloud messaging? Blackberry will be shutting down BIS just in time for everyone to point and laugh at how far behind the times BlackBerry is because they don't have their own cloud push services anymore unless you're on BES. The irony of this I killing me.

    Typed from my AT&T passport
    Q10Bold likes this.
    10-16-15 09:04 AM
  2. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    Blackberry are not exactly supporters of privacy
    Like someone mentioned the Chinese had a go at it "Operation Aurora " https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...767_story.html

    The disturbing part is that there was a need for a court order for them "Google " to admit it.

    In other words don't expect them to readily admit that they were compromised

    Your "Privacy" is only as "secure"as much as you have control over it and vice versa.

    Yes BlackBerry has been moving more in that direction. Especially with the arrival of the Priv.

    Posted via CB10
    10-16-15 09:06 AM
  3. darkehawke's Avatar
    Like someone mentioned the Chinese had a go at it "Operation Aurora " https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...767_story.html

    The disturbing part is that there was a need for a court order for them "Google " to admit it.


    Posted via CB10
    Errm thats not what that link you posted says?
    The link tells a story quite the opposite of what you just said
    10-16-15 09:14 AM
  4. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    Errm thats not what that link you posted says?
    The link tells a story quite the opposite of what you just said
    "Although Google disclosed an intrusion by Chinese hackers in 2010, it made no reference to the breach of the database with information on court orders."

    They were left with no other alternative but to go "Public " however in the court order no reference was made to it.
    Posted via CB10
    10-16-15 09:28 AM
  5. darkehawke's Avatar
    "Although Google disclosed an intrusion by Chinese hackers in 2010, it made no reference to the breach of the database with information on court orders."

    They were left with no other alternative but to go "Public " however in the court order no reference was made to it.
    Posted via CB10
    Thats not what the article is saying.
    It's saying that Google went public about the hack, but did not tell the public about the fact it's servers containing court orders had been compromised also.

    These would be Court Orders to Google regarding information on Individuals

    They instead informed the FBI who carried out an investigation, during which Google refused access to their servers as it was not sure on the outcome.
    The outcome was no threat to national security was deemed.
    techvisor likes this.
    10-16-15 09:39 AM
  6. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    Thats not what the article is saying.
    It's saying that Google went public about the hack, but did not tell the public about the fact it's servers containing court orders had been compromised also.

    These would be Court Orders to Google regarding information on Individuals

    They instead informed the FBI who carried out an investigation, during which Google refused access to their servers as it was not sure on the outcome.
    The outcome was no threat to national security was deemed.
    The question that you must have asked is who prompted Google to go Public. Further more since that time Google entered into an "alliance with the NSA. Indeed in their revised terms of service there is this paragraph, "Under Googles terms of service, the company advises its users that it may share their personal information with outside organizations, including government agencies, in order to detect, prevent, or otherwise address fraud, security or technical issues and to protect against harm to the rights, property or safety of Google.

    Point is , NO one or any organization should ever have the ability to collect, store, share dispose of any information gleaned from ones personal email or writings in an effort to keep us "safe " . The ramifications are enormous. Especially as the Chinese hack proved ,if that information gets into the wrong hands.




    Posted via CB10
    10-16-15 09:51 AM
  7. darkehawke's Avatar
    The question that you must have asked is who prompted Google to go Public. Further more since that time Google entered into an "alliance with the NSA. Indeed in their revised terms of service there is this paragraph, "Under Google’s terms of service, the company advises its users that it may share their “personal information” with outside organizations, including government agencies, in order to “detect, prevent, or otherwise address fraud, security or technical issues” and to “protect against harm to the rights, property or safety of Google.

    Point is , NO one or any organization should ever have the ability to collect, store, share dispose of any information gleaned from ones personal email or writings in an effort to keep us "safe " . The ramifications are enormous. Especially as the Chinese hack proved ,if that information gets into the wrong hands.




    Posted via CB10
    In the article it states that the nature of the attack itself prompted Google to go public.

    And yes i know those terms, Blackberry also has those terms. So you can say the same thing about them.
    The thing with Google is that a lot of publicity has been made about them forcing Government bodies to obtain court orders instead of just handing over data on request
    techvisor likes this.
    10-16-15 09:56 AM
  8. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    In the article it states that the nature of the attack itself prompted Google to go public.

    And yes i know those terms, Blackberry also has those terms. So you can say the same thing about them.
    The thing with Google is that a lot of publicity has been made about them forcing Government bodies to obtain court orders instead of just handing over data on request
    Yes I know that BlackBerry has modified their terms as well. The problem with Google is they are literally in bed with the another agency directly "sharing " information. They don't need a court order when they already have the information. It's just a formality. Again I reiterate what you must ask yourself is who prompted Google to go Public with the hack.

    We have encountered enough episodes in history ,whereby, the human will has been suppressed by individuals who had power over them by use of personal information. Google plays both sides of the coin on one hand they say that they promote the sharing of information by freedom of speech, keeping you safe, etc, yet on the other hand they allow for that information to be abused.

    Let me go further, Google allows for extortion of individuals, identity theft,embarrassment, exploitation etc etc whether it's done unintentionally or not it must be curtailed. It's a "tool " that if used in the right way can work to make life easier, however with their current model, it's a dangerous thing.




    Posted via CB10
    10-16-15 10:14 AM
  9. Bbnivende's Avatar
    I had with the stock email client on my Nexus and Google recommended to me that I should use a third party apps. I chose Aqua. It works fine. I have had no indications that my mail has been data mined but it might be. I tend to ignore it.


    I think I will send myself a piece of mail about some subject to see if some how It comes up via the Google "home page" of suggested topics that I might be interested in.

    Posted via CB10
    10-16-15 01:09 PM
  10. BCITMike's Avatar
    The "compromise" comes from within, have a read :
    http://www.theguardian.com/technolog...-terms-clarify

    Posted via CB10
    Oh, so you just don't understand terminology and substitute your own definitions. That's by design, not from being hacked.

    Google has a reputation of being secure. You don't understand the topic well enough.

    Posted via CB10
    techvisor likes this.
    10-16-15 02:17 PM
  11. WaterTower's Avatar
    I'm just going to shut the Doze service off. It's that easy!

    Blackberry Z10 was the beginning. The Z30 is my upgrade
    10-16-15 04:35 PM
  12. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    Oh, so you just don't understand terminology and substitute your own definitions. That's by design, not from being hacked.

    Google has a reputation of being secure. You don't understand the topic well enough.

    Posted via CB10
    No please enlightened.

    Posted via CB10
    10-16-15 06:25 PM
  13. aha's Avatar
    Thanks OP. If HUB can be dozed off, it would be a huge problem. And simply turn off doze feature of Android is not a great option neither because you do want to doze off those junk apps.

    PassportSQW100-1/10.3.2.2639
    10-16-15 06:38 PM
  14. BCITMike's Avatar
    No please enlightened.

    Posted via CB10
    Privacy != security. They are two different animals. Related, but not the same.

    Scanning emails for targetted ads as per agreed terms of use/service is not a security issue. Allowing email accounts to login without passwords or protections, would be a security issue.

    Google is one of the leaders in encryption, SSL everywhere, two factor authentication, etc. They are not impenetrable, but tell me who isn't? There are tons and tons of fortune 500 and governments and banks who are hacked all the time.

    If the only hacks on Google are by state sponsored hackers, they are relatively pretty secure.
    techvisor likes this.
    10-16-15 07:33 PM
  15. BCITMike's Avatar
    Blackberry are not exactly supporters of privacy
    *whoosh*

    How did you miss the million threads on the new BlackBerry PRIV, short for privacy?

    PRIV also introduces the exclusive DTEK™ by BlackBerry warning system app to provide you with the power of privacy.
    BlackBerry respects your privacy and will never share your information.
    Compared to Google ('nuff said) and Apple (CarrierIQ scandal), BlackBerry is leagues ahead of Apple and Google and probably only behind BlackPhone.
    10-16-15 08:01 PM
  16. jackcarr's Avatar
    Didn't Chen say BB10 would stay for government? Maybe we'll get two more years solid out of it before they start phasing it out.

    Posted via Z10
    darkehawke and bh7171 like this.
    10-16-15 08:38 PM
  17. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    Privacy != security. They are two different animals. Related, but not the same.

    Scanning emails for targetted ads as per agreed terms of use/service is not a security issue. Allowing email accounts to login without passwords or protections, would be a security issue.

    Google is one of the leaders in encryption, SSL everywhere, two factor authentication, etc. They are not impenetrable, but tell me who isn't? There are tons and tons of fortune 500 and governments and banks who are hacked all the time.

    If the only hacks on Google are by state sponsored hackers, they are relatively pretty secure.
    That is where persons such as yourself get tied up. It's NOT two different animals it's one and the same, it's symbiotic, As for them NOT being hacked I think they already acknowledged that they were. Actually the Chinese were doing it for a sustained length of time. Again some provider sniffing ones email for " targeted " advertising is NOT a secure Procedure. Sorry I disagree with your entire sentiment. It's not as benign as you want it to seem. The fact that they modified their TOS is testament of how they treat and handle users information. Just as a home security system protects the privacy and integrity of a household, a data security policy is put in place to ensure data privacy. Good luck!

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by crackbrry fan; 10-16-15 at 11:47 PM.
    Jahcure likes this.
    10-16-15 10:00 PM
  18. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Have gmail's server ever been hacked?


    Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk
    Yes, a resounding yes.

    It's a social engineering attack called P.R.I.S.M. ...
    :-)

    You get the point...

     Ahoy, Privateers, ... get ready for some data piracy...! ;-) 
    10-17-15 02:39 AM
  19. ubizmo's Avatar
    We'll from what I've been able to find out, denverralphy is correct. GCM won't involve data mining email, unless developers intentionally wrote their apps that way. So Google's servers shouldn't see email going to the Hub, unless of course it's gmail. Developers are annoyed because they seemingly now have to rewrite email apps to use GCM. If their apps are also on non-Google Android, those apps are now forked.


    Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk
    10-17-15 06:29 AM
  20. Ray Soto's Avatar
    This is exactly what I don't like. Sobyour third party email client must allow for your email to-be sent to Google servers first and then you can receive emails when the phone is nothing use. Why is this even allowed? Why would Google do this? I know why, it's so they can mine your information that's why. Even more reason why I'll pass on this Priv contraption that has been created. Bad move by blackberry, bad move. Blackberry mobile is dead. Time for a new phone. Maybe apple had it right all along, maybe

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    10-17-15 06:40 AM
  21. Ray Soto's Avatar
    So, let me get this straight... BlackBerry that had BIS for push email from the start that other smartphone users loathed, have now all come full circle and are providing push services from their own cloud servers to try and extend battery life which BlackBerry has always done pretty well? Apple iCloud and Google cloud messaging? Blackberry will be shutting down BIS just in time for everyone to point and laugh at how far behind the times BlackBerry is because they don't have their own cloud push services anymore unless you're on BES. The irony of this I killing me.

    Typed from my AT&T passport
    No bud, your email goes from your client server to goggles client server first soothes can mine your information. That's why thesis being done. It has nothing to do with security at all.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    10-17-15 06:42 AM
46 12

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