06-04-09 11:30 PM
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  1. JilliB's Avatar
    My concern would be how adictive the BB's are. I'm in my 40's and I just can't leave mine alone. I'm always tinkering with mine or on this site and to be honest it does make me a little unsociable at times. Maybe not a good thing for a 13 year old.
    05-17-09 05:10 AM
  2. Hurricane2k9's Avatar
    My concern would be how adictive the BB's are. I'm in my 40's and I just can't leave mine alone. I'm always tinkering with mine or on this site and to be honest it does make me a little unsociable at times. Maybe not a good thing for a 13 year old.
    Not to sound rude but you haven't seen today's 13 year olds. Texting is the new talking. My sister might as well just have 100 minutes per month on her phone... she almost always just uses texts.

    Honestly, for a 13 year old I'd get a texting phone with unlimited texting. Chances are they just use texts, calls and Facebook. I'm 17 and got my first BlackBerry in October. I pay half of the data plan. I use a lot of apps like Facebook, beeJive, and the web browser is indispensable. I also use email a fair amount and it's nice to have a solid, clean interface for it. BBM is great because a couple of my friends also have Berries, and it just so happens that these are some of my closer friends whom I talk with a lot. So that means less texts being used (although we have unlimited texting on our family shared plan, so that's a moot point in my case).
    05-17-09 12:45 PM
  3. MRSBROWN2006's Avatar
    I say get it, but make the child pay for the data plan and any overages. I have a teen on the second line of my sep plan with sprint, so that eliminates any overage situation, and I am willing to pay for the plan. But that's just me.
    05-17-09 12:53 PM
  4. danhclare's Avatar
    I am 18 but I use it for my work schedule and keep track of when projects are due.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-17-09 12:56 PM
  5. MRSBROWN2006's Avatar
    Honestly... we won't have the right answer. You know your teen and you know whether she needs a blackberry or is even responsible for one (if it is only a want).

    My answer: Whenever you feel your teen is ready. My son is 2 years old now, but I will probably get him a phone as soon as he is able to understand how to dial me. Heck, I might program every button to be my speed dial.
    My child is five years old and she has had a prepaid phone (Virgin Mobile) since she was three. I am away from her, as is her father for 8-12hrs a day (work for us, school for her), so it helps my peace of mind to know that I can reach her at anytime, without having to wait for a teacher or babysitter to bring her to the phone. She has always been responsible about even the smallest of her toys, so for us the decision was easier. We bought two phones so that if she loses one, the other is ready to go. She has had the same phone for a couple of years now and not even a scratch. She turns it off during classtime, keeps it in her pocket or purse (if there's no pockets), all in all this was what works for us. Age is irrelevant. Kids learn responsibility at different stages so only the parents know when the time is right. When our daughter turns 12 or 13, she will more than likely have a bb b/c I already know she's responsible with her belongings.
    05-17-09 12:59 PM
  6. skyjackal's Avatar
    I want to get my teen a blackberry ( for many different reasons).
    My husband says she's too young and not responsible enought for one. Now I've been reading the old posts about teens and blackberry's the youngest I've seen is 15 yro ( mine is 13). My question to my Crackbeery nation is how young is too young. I want to know everyone's opinon on the subject.
    I feel that if you are responsibile enough not to breack the phone and use it well, you can have it. My husband says 13 it too young and get a "throw away" phone.
    What do you think?
    ( she has had a prepaid before)
    Have not read the entire thread (but I will) but at the moment I can say this - being responsible enough not to break the phone and to use it well falls way short, especially for a 13 year old. So many other factors to consider. More to come! : )

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-18-09 11:51 PM
  7. Jambus's Avatar
    When the user can pay for it himself.
    05-19-09 01:52 AM
  8. joshmchau's Avatar
    Your daughter is going to be a crackberry addict. These phones will introduce to her the pleasures of power texting. The features on a Blackberry are vast and is a joy to those who know how to use it. I'd pass for now, get her another nice phone for another 2 years then make the transition.
    Last edited by joshmchau; 05-19-09 at 04:08 AM.
    05-19-09 03:59 AM
  9. schirmerdt's Avatar
    When the user can pay for it himself.
    I couldnt have said that any better
    05-19-09 04:21 AM
  10. skyboxer's Avatar
    I dunno that e-trade baby looks pretty comfortable with his!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-19-09 05:58 AM
  11. sleepydumbdude's Avatar
    I don't have kids but if I did then I'd say 15 for a new device and 13 if I gave them my old one I didn't use anymore. My neighbor is 13 and has a Bold and got one before me and I was jealous. Seems to know what he is doing with it but no way I'd purchase them a device new at that age to lose or get stolen.
    05-20-09 01:04 PM
  12. gingiemay's Avatar
    My brother is 17 years old and has lost his phone about 3 times. Luckily someone manages to find it and return it to him (usually at school). I don't think he'll be getting a new phone until he pays for it himself.
    05-20-09 01:28 PM
  13. GIXXERJOE's Avatar
    I am jumping in this conversation a little late, but better late than never, right! Anyways I believe that the age of the child does not matter. But more so how responsible they are. You will know that the best . I think that a blackberry has many benefits for both the child and the parent because of the many different communication ability that a blackberry has, as well I think that a blackberry even can help with doing research for homework and such. On the other hand it has its downsides as well, when it come to children. You will be giving your child pretty much un restricted internet on the phone. With no way to monitor activity that she will be doing on it. So you know your child best, if you feel like she will be responsible with it go for it. Why not... you always can take it away.
    05-20-09 01:44 PM
  14. illicitstylz's Avatar
    wow talk about kids growing up fast, bb in hand when they're 14
    05-20-09 02:27 PM
  15. Khalnath's Avatar
    I'm no parent, and God willing, I never will be, but I thought you might like the perspective of a current University student.

    I'm a mature student (spent 5 years working and not going to school) and I can remember the time before kids had cell phones. He||, I remember getting my first cellphone in high school...



    Everyone made fun of me for it! To be fair, it was a bit of a brick, but nobody ELSE had one. Now, at my school, *EVERYONE* has either a BlackBerry or an iPhone.

    Smartphones offer you the ability to organize your life better. You won't forget an appointment if your BlackBerry remembers for you. IMO it's important to teach children about new technologies early. If you've ever noticed that the younger generation adapts much more quickly to technology than you (or at least your parents), that's why.

    As far as unsupervised access to the internet goes, you should be teaching your children to be safe when it comes to strangers, whether online or in the meatworld. I had unsupervised internet access when I was 13, in the days of 14.4kbps dialup modems. Never hurt me none. Mind you, I never gave out my real address or phone number, either.
    05-20-09 08:48 PM
  16. MelanieRaye's Avatar
    I'm a middle school teacher, and honestly, it makes me nervous when I see these kids with phones with picture capabilities only because of the sexting issue. It should be a time of innocence, but too often it is not. I would say that as a parent, you know your child and whether he/she is mature enough to handle certain situations, behaviors, and responsibilities. If not, you know what to do!
    05-20-09 08:57 PM
  17. Khalnath's Avatar
    I'm a middle school teacher, and honestly, it makes me nervous when I see these kids with phones with picture capabilities only because of the sexting issue.
    Sexting is not an "issue". The only difference between "sexting" and "playing doctor" is that sexting is easier for parents to notice. I don't buy the whole "It'll come back to haunt you if you go into politics" argument either. By the time your teenager gets to politician age, all his or her competitors are going to be in the same boat, and the teenagers at that time will be into something new for your kids to get all bent out of shape about.

    Unless, of course, America ditches all the baggage about how horrible and evil it is to enjoy sex. Somehow I don't see that happening any time soon, though.

    (Oh yeah, and "sexting" is hardly limited to BlackBerries. BBs tend to have crummy cameras compared to dumb phones. If it bothers you that much, get an 8800. It's good enough for Obama...)
    05-20-09 09:32 PM
  18. mab4285's Avatar
    Sexting is not an "issue". The only difference between "sexting" and "playing doctor" is that sexting is easier for parents to notice. I don't buy the whole "It'll come back to haunt you if you go into politics" argument either. By the time your teenager gets to politician age, all his or her competitors are going to be in the same boat, and the teenagers at that time will be into something new for your kids to get all bent out of shape about.

    Unless, of course, America ditches all the baggage about how horrible and evil it is to enjoy sex. Somehow I don't see that happening any time soon, though.

    (Oh yeah, and "sexting" is hardly limited to BlackBerries. BBs tend to have crummy cameras compared to dumb phones. If it bothers you that much, get an 8800. It's good enough for Obama...)

    Sexting IS and issue when you have minors being the ones photographed and sending the pics....
    05-20-09 09:36 PM
  19. Khalnath's Avatar
    Sexting IS and issue when you have minors being the ones photographed and sending the pics....
    My point is merely that this behavior isn't inherent to phones. Kids have been "playing doctor" since before there was a language to describe why it's supposedly wrong. "Children" who are post-pubescent are going to experiment with their sexualities. It's a fact. Don't blame the stupid phone, especially when digital cameras are available for $10 at Wal-Mart. I might note that I offered a suggestion if you're really paranoid about it anyway. The 8800 series do not have a camera.

    Craigslist hardly invented prostitution, either.
    05-20-09 09:41 PM
  20. StrwBerryBlond's Avatar
    Most kids have & need cell phones, because most families are always on-the-go. What I've seen from my 10 year old & her friends is that the most important thing to them is texting. Hands down, they text more than they talk. Secondly they want to be able to customize their phones with ringtones, pictures, cases, rhinestones, whatever. These basics can be met with nearly ANY phone. Just don't forget the unlimited text package! If you want to step it up a little get a phone with camera, full keyboard & a memory card. Many basic phones also have calendars, alarms, calculators etc. for organization. No smartphone needed.
    My kid got the free phone that was being offered at the time & when the charging portal broke on it, she started doing extra chores & saved her $$ for a new one. She now has an Envi & loves it, but is asking for a Berry. Not because she needs a Berry, but because her Mom has 1. She won't get a Berry until she's paying the bill herself. And btw she's not getting a Benz when she's 16 either.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-20-09 11:31 PM
  21. vndlewis's Avatar
    Sexting is not an "issue". The only difference between "sexting" and "playing doctor" is that sexting is easier for parents to notice.
    It is obvious you don't work with youth. It is an issue and it is a problem.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-20-09 11:41 PM
  22. andrewa124's Avatar
    I would say, if they can afford it on their own. Fine, get one. I don't think a 13 year old should have a bb.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-20-09 11:49 PM
  23. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    It is obvious you don't work with youth. It is an issue and it is a problem.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I think what he was saying is that it's not a Blackberry-exclusive issue.
    06-04-09 07:51 PM
  24. iamtim's Avatar
    I think what he was saying is that it's not a Blackberry-exclusive issue.
    Exactly.

    This kinda stuff has been going on for time immemorial, it's only the inexpensive proliferation of technology which makes this any different. I mean, c'mon. I lost my virginity long before I was legal, as did... well... probably 85% of my high school.

    And while I didn't have camera phones back then, I did have a Polaroid camera. As did many of my friends. And yes, we took pictures of things we shouldn't have.

    And in my dad's day, it was "lookout point" or the drive-in theatre where nearly every other car contained underage kids going at it like rabbits.

    I'm not saying that it's not wrong, or that it's not bad decision making either. I'm just saying that reacting like it's some new thing with a clever name that is pandemic to today's youth is wrong when stuff like this has been going on forever. It's not the technology's fault.

    "Sexting." *shaking head*
    06-04-09 11:30 PM
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