03-06-17 07:59 PM
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  1. thurask's Avatar
    Some companies just use their devices to exchange data or for pure communications.
    And yet, if they're using stuff like GSuite or anything more than just email, they're unable to use it on BB10. Even if they have BB10 devices on BES, if it needs an Android app it ain't happening.

    Note: It is currently not possible to install Android applications to the Work Space on BlackBerry 10 smartphones and BlackBerry PlayBook devices; this is by design.

    The Android Runtime operates in the Personal Space of BlackBerry 10 smartphone and BlackBerry PlayBook tablets and not in the Work Space where Corporate applications are installed to.
    Superfly_FR and anon(9803228) like this.
    03-05-17 01:03 PM
  2. bakron1's Avatar
    I refuse to buy into the mentality that the price of living in a connected world is allowing companies to mine your data.

    Posted from my Q10 via CB10
    It's called reality in 2017, I afraid to say.
    03-05-17 01:38 PM
  3. DonHB's Avatar
    And yet, if they're using stuff like GSuite or anything more than just email, they're unable to use it on BB10. Even if they have BB10 devices on BES, if it needs an Android app it ain't happening.
    Which is why it was a mistake for BlackBerry to, instead of supporting the Flow UX on top of the Android SDK, begin with Cascades. It would also have been a good will gesture to the BBOS developers using Java. Not licensing Google Play Services would have allowed them to pursue any development tools the market would want and not be beholden to Alphabet. When John Chen became CEO he had the opportunity to adjust the company's direction without tying BlackBerry's hands. Perhaps not directly manufacturing handsets changes the licensing terms...

    .02
    03-05-17 01:48 PM
  4. DonHB's Avatar
    It's called reality in 2017, I afraid to say.
    Microsoft has also joined in. On the other hand the Amazon Fire phone failed.
    03-05-17 01:52 PM
  5. conite's Avatar
    Which is why it was a mistake for BlackBerry to, instead of supporting the Flow UX on top of the Android SDK, begin with Cascades. It would also have been a good will gesture to the BBOS developers using Java. Not licensing Google Play Services would have allowed them to pursue any development tools the market would want and not be beholden to Alphabet. When John Chen became CEO he had the opportunity to adjust the company's direction without tying BlackBerry's hands. Perhaps not directly manufacturing handsets changes the licensing terms...

    .02
    How does this help a BB10 device run G Suite in its work space?
    03-05-17 01:58 PM
  6. Wezard's Avatar
    Google gets pretty much whatever you allow it to get. If you want to use the apps and get app updates, you have to allow them to know which apps you have. If you turn location off, google has no idea where you are. If you use their browser, they get a lot of data - so use another browser. If you back your pics and vids to their cloud, google has them - so back then up some where else.
    If you pull the phone out of the box, download a handful of apps, and go your merry way, then you have pretty much given Google the keys to the kingdom.
    But if you take the time to understand and set the various settings and permissions, Google gets very little.

    I'd worry more about the carrier, but at this point they haven't figured out how to turn a profit on data mining.
    They will, Microsoft / Windows finally figured it out, and is in the business now.
    app_Developer and BigBadWulf like this.
    03-05-17 03:28 PM
  7. anon(6038817)'s Avatar
    It's called reality in 2017, I afraid to say.
    No, it's really not.

    Posted from my Q10 via CB10
    03-05-17 03:49 PM
  8. AluminiumRims's Avatar
    Microsoft has also joined in. On the other hand the Amazon Fire phone failed.
    Yes, but Amazon Fire is an Android phone and yet it failed. Too much competition with other Android phones.
    03-05-17 04:31 PM
  9. Wezard's Avatar
    Yes, but Amazon Fire is an Android phone and yet it failed. Too much competition with other Android phones.
    Was going to point out that the Amazon Fire is a tablet, not a phone. But decided to take a quick look first. Good thing I did, there was an Amazon Fire Phone. It failed so bad I didn't even know it existed.
    03-05-17 06:49 PM
  10. howarmat's Avatar
    The fire phone was fantastic hardware. Great camera etc. Problem was it was priced as much as a iPhone and any other top tier device and no google play store. I would have loved to have my fire phone updated to even Lollipop.
    jope28 likes this.
    03-05-17 06:54 PM
  11. sorinv's Avatar
    Was going to point out that the Amazon Fire is a tablet, not a phone. But decided to take a quick look first. Good thing I did, there was an Amazon Fire Phone. It failed so bad I didn't even know it existed.
    I am curious if there more of those sold than all of BlackBerry's android phones together.

    Posted via CB10
    03-05-17 07:55 PM
  12. DonHB's Avatar
    How does this help a BB10 device run G Suite in its work space?
    None, but at time when a non-Google certified Android platform had a chance at success alternatives would have had opportunities when the G-suite barely had a foot hold.
    03-05-17 08:18 PM
  13. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    People have an inflated perception of their own importance. For most of us the only information anyone cares about us is to sell us stuff.

    What cracks me up about this site is how everyone complains they can't get access to google services, then when blackberry gives complete access people complain about privacy.
    Additionally using Gmail and Yahoo addresses.
    03-05-17 08:27 PM
  14. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    The only difference between what information BlackBerry has, and what the Google has, is some of you trust BlackBerry more. Were Google to become nefarious, it would be exposed quickly, and they would fall like a lead balloon.
    03-05-17 09:02 PM
  15. sonicpix's Avatar
    I have said this a thousand times that anytime you access the grid, you sacrifice some of your privacy and unfortunately that's the price we pay for technology.

    I always tell folks to have a good password and stay away from websites your not familiar with. As far as companies mining your data, welcome to the 21st century. Life is way to short to worry about it.
    10 years ago we called it spyware. Today we call them apps.
    DonHB likes this.
    03-05-17 09:57 PM
  16. sonicpix's Avatar
    The only difference between what information BlackBerry has, and what the Google has, is some of you trust BlackBerry more. Were Google to become nefarious, it would be exposed quickly, and they would fall like a lead balloon.
    Google has already been expose for doing the work for the US State Department.
    03-05-17 10:01 PM
  17. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Google has already been expose for doing the work for the US State Department.
    http://www.theverge.com/2016/4/18/11...bate-apple-fbi
    anon(9803228) likes this.
    03-05-17 10:12 PM
  18. sorinv's Avatar
    The only difference between what information BlackBerry has, and what the Google has, is some of you trust BlackBerry more. Were Google to become nefarious, it would be exposed quickly, and they would fall like a lead balloon.
    As if they haven't been exposed many times spying on people's wi-fi networks while driving by.
    Google analytics is everywhere, on everyone's webpages, including Crackberry's and Blackberry's . The excuse being that they provide useful services.
    There are a lot of companies that provide useful services without datamining you and recording your clicks.

    Crackberry offers analytics to many.. BlackBerry only to Google ;-)


    Posted via CB10
    Attachment 418682
    Attachment 418683
    Last edited by sorinv; 03-05-17 at 11:33 PM.
    03-05-17 11:23 PM
  19. CharlieV's Avatar
    I have always scoffed at those who said, in response to any question about privacy, "what have you got to hide?" I still scoff at the idiots who post that, because they entirely miss the point of privacy. But there a small kernel of truth in their ramblings, and that is the corollary to their insipid question: assume everything you do on or with your phone is available to at least your government. That's true regardless of the operating system or overlays such as DTEK and encryption.
    03-05-17 11:24 PM
  20. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    As if they haven't been exposed many times spying on people's wi-fi networks while driving by.
    Google analytics is everywhere, on everyone's webpages, including crackberry's and blackberry's . The excuse being that they provide useful services.
    There are a lot of companies that provide useful services without datamining you and recording your clicks.

    Posted via CB10
    There's a big difference between anonymous and personal data.
    Thud Hardsmack likes this.
    03-05-17 11:25 PM
  21. sorinv's Avatar
    There's a big difference between anonymous and personal data.
    Google is on all the websites you click on and records the IP address from which you click. Nothing they record is anonymous. They aggregate all the data about you. No other company, not even a government, is as powerful and has access to that much data to know everything about anyone.

    Posted via CB10
    03-05-17 11:28 PM
  22. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Google is on all the websites you click on and records the IP address from which you click. Nothing they record is anonymous. They aggregate all the data about you. No other company, not even a government, is as powerful and has access to that much data to know everything about anyone.

    Posted via CB10
    You actually believe an IP address identifies you specifically?
    Thud Hardsmack likes this.
    03-05-17 11:32 PM
  23. sorinv's Avatar
    You actually believe an IP address identifies you specifically?
    Not by itself, but by repeated collection and other information, they can easily put it all together.
    Even the banks check to see which computer/phone/tablet you log from or which IP address. They know when you connect from an unusual IP address. Google knows that, too, plus a lot more.

    Posted via CB10
    03-05-17 11:40 PM
  24. ryder55's Avatar
    https://thenextweb.com/google/2016/0...#.tnw_wbfxhLDV

    Even snowden who has nothing to lose is saying users shouldn't use some Google apps. Lots of guys on here think they know more about the way Google works than Google itself

    Posted via CB10
    03-05-17 11:45 PM
  25. jmr1015's Avatar
    I don't get how companies would use Android over OS10.

    I mean, sure, apps and stuff work on Android.

    But the thing is that Google has complete access to your communications - what if you send e-mails with some kind of prototypes etc.
    Why would you want an another company to have access to company secrets?!

    Also, I claim - even if you set Android privacy settings to most private they will probably still track anything.

    Posted via CB10
    Usually if you're sending any sort of sensitive materials, you're using secure servers and end to end encryption. Google having "compete access to your communications" still wouldn't allow them to simply decrypt properly encrypted data.
    BigBadWulf likes this.
    03-05-17 11:49 PM
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