1. Originalloverman's Avatar
    The French Parliament is considering a legislative provision*that would ban strong encryption*by requiring tech companies to configure their systems so that police and intelligence agencies could always access their data.

    The amendment*to the vast "Digital Republic" bill was introduced in the French National Assembly, parliament's lower house, by eighteen politicians from the conservative Republican Party.*

    The Digital Republic bill, which covers everything from net neutrality to the online publication of scientific research, will be examined and debated this week along with 400 amendments to it.

    The anti-encryption amendment is largely seen as a response to the two deadly Paris terrorist attacks in 2015, despite the fact that the attackers repeatedly used unencrypted communications in the leadup to the killings.

    Authorities still don't fully know how the terrorists planned their operations, but the ISIS-inspired militants signaled the start to the Nov. 13 attacks through unencrypted text messages. They also traded unencrypted phone calls with senior operatives elsewhere in Europe. French authorities say that some blind spots remain due to encrypted messaging services like Telegram.

    In the weeks since the November attacks, the French government has come under sustained criticism for sacrificing liberty for security. The country has been in a state of emergency for two months, a legal status that gives President François Hollande vast new law-enforcement powers.

    The Digital Republic bill came just as the Netherlands issued a statement in favor of strong encryption, promising not to weaken*it for investigative purposes.

    It's unclear whether the encryption amendment would have prevented either of the Paris terrorist attacks.

    “The attackers were all*known*to the police and intelligence services!" the security researcher calling himself "the Grugq" told the Daily Dot. "Al Qaeda fretted constantly about finding 'clean skins,' new terrorists who weren’t known to security forces. ISIS publishes a magazine featuring an interview and [a] huge photograph of the cell leader’s face. Then they send him into Europe and he does just what he said he would do in his interview. There is little that can be blamed on encryption here."

    Encryption is technology that scrambles data so that only those people who have the keys can unscramble it. It is part of many commonplace Internet activities like commerce and communications.

    Many Apple iOS and Google Android devices are now encrypted by default, a move that has reignited a*global debate over privacy and encryption*because of the technology's use by cybercriminals, terrorists, and sexual predators. Encryption advocates point to its use by human rights activists, journalists, governments, and tech companies seeking to avoid surveillance and hackers.

    The new French bill briefly praises encryption’s role in protecting user data but immediately pivots to criticizing the effects of strong encryption on state security forces.

    "France must take the initiative and force device manufacturers to take into consideration the imperative of access for law enforcement officers, under the control of a judge and only in the case of an investigation, to those devices," the legislation reads, according to a translation by Khalil Sehnaoui, a Middle-East security specialist and founder of Krypton Security. "The goal is to avoid that individual encryption systems delay the advancement of an investigation."

    Technologists and open-Internet advocates disagree, arguing that strong encryption—which even the tech companies themselves cannot break—is a crucial part of online privacy and security.

    Tech executives like Apple CEO Tim Cook*warn that building weaknesses into cryptography will help hackers and hurt average Internet users.

    "Let me be crystal clear: Weakening encryption or taking it away harms good people who are using it for the right reason," he argued last year.

    Cook and a bevy of tech executives met with U.S. officials*last week to discuss how to fight terrorists on social media; encryption briefly came up at the meeting, according to a senior administration official.

    Source French government considers law that would outlaw strong encryption

    Posted via CB10
    01-13-16 11:30 AM
  2. Originalloverman's Avatar
    Also a great read, check out The rise of the new Crypto War

    By Eric Geller http://www.dailydot.com/politics/enc...y-fbi-privacy/

    Posted via CB10
    01-13-16 11:38 AM
  3. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Liberté, legalité, securité... ? =8-o

    Something doesn't match... ^

    :-)

    •   There's a Crack in the Berry right now...   •
    ALToronto likes this.
    01-13-16 06:37 PM
  4. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    Well I wish them Good luck with that. I wonder if they know that, you can open an email account ,write a draft, leave it in the draft box and give someone else the email accounts password for them to access the said email draft .they can respond with an answer and have the other person respond back and forth all the while not actually sending an email period. The fear mongering and idiotic ideas that weaker encryption will some how fix the problem is truly pathetic.

    Giving up ones right to Privacy, all in the name of keeping us safe is also quite sad. Their are also hundreds of other ways for these cretins to communicate with out using conventional transmissions methods.

    This breach in encryption will open a Pandora s box that once opened will be difficult to put back in.

    Posted via CB10
    Rustybronco likes this.
    01-13-16 07:46 PM
  5. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Well I wish them Good luck with that. I wonder if they know that, you can open an email account ,write a draft, leave it in the draft box and give someone else the email accounts password for them to access the said email draft .they can respond with an answer and have the other person respond back and forth all the while not actually sending an email period. The fear mongering and idiotic ideas that weaker encryption will some how fix the problem is truly pathetic.

    Giving up ones right to Privacy, all in the name of keeping us safe is also quite sad. Their are also hundreds of other ways for these cretins to communicate with out using conventional transmissions methods.

    This breach in encryption will open a Pandora s box that once opened will be difficult to put back in.

    Posted via CB10
    Yeah. Looks like they didn't even really use encryption. So there are ulterior motives to this... :-)



    •   There's a Crack in the Berry right now...   •
    01-13-16 11:51 PM
  6. missing_K-W's Avatar
    War on encryption? Sounds like American lingo.

    France PM......get on the phone with with Obama, who in turn will direct you to the NSA. Problem solved. No need for sensationalism.

    Posted via CB10
    01-13-16 11:54 PM
  7. sorinv's Avatar
    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-35251429

    The Dutch government decided to back strong encryption.
    All the arguments in the above link contradict the British and French government positions on encryption.
    01-14-16 02:59 AM
  8. jsmith00075's Avatar
    They already said the attackers in Paris didn't even use any encryption but plain messages..
    Superdupont 2_0 likes this.
    01-14-16 05:11 AM
  9. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    They already said the attackers in Paris didn't even use any encryption but plain messages..
    This.

    If we would have to raise tax and invest in people and equipment, I would understand.

    But weakening all encryption although encryption wasn't used to orchestrate this and other terror attacks, is simply no solution for the core issues.


    Posted via CB10
    01-16-16 11:35 PM
  10. TgeekB's Avatar
    Yeah. Looks like they didn't even really use encryption. So there are ulterior motives to this... :-)



    •   There's a Crack in the Berry right now...   •
    Could you explain to us what the ulterior motive/conspiracy theory is?
    01-17-16 08:24 AM
  11. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Could you explain to us what the ulterior motive/conspiracy theory is?
    Check internet. You've missed the great encryption debate that's been on for years..?

    :-D

    •   There's a Crack in the Berry right now...   •
    01-17-16 03:30 PM
  12. Q10Bold's Avatar
    Last time Chen was ok with police and the whole encryption thing...

    Posted via Q10Bold
    01-17-16 03:44 PM
  13. TgeekB's Avatar
    Check internet. You've missed the great encryption debate that's been on for years..?

    :-D

    •   There's a Crack in the Berry right now...   •
    Oh I've seen the Internet debate, I just thought you had some information.

    I don't believe 90% of the junk I read on the Internet.
    01-17-16 03:50 PM
  14. jsmith00075's Avatar
    Oh I've seen the Internet debate, I just thought you had some information.

    I don't believe 90% of the junk I read on the Internet.
    But you believe 110% of the junk the gov and local media report to you?
    01-19-16 06:48 PM
  15. TgeekB's Avatar
    But you believe 110% of the junk the gov and local media report to you?
    I try my best to find sources with the appropriate research. I'm not on a side, except the side of common sense which most of the Internet lacks.
    01-19-16 06:51 PM
  16. sorinv's Avatar
    Common sense depends on political and cultural background and experience.
    Some people think common sense is that all communications should be private.
    Others may think common sense is that the government and some companies have the right to read our minds.
    01-20-16 12:40 AM
  17. Soapm's Avatar
    In the meantime the politicians are receiving huge campaign contributions from the strong encryption industry that was never really under threat...
    01-20-16 12:56 AM

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