11-14-11 04:26 PM
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  1. david9962000's Avatar
    11-12-11 10:29 PM
  2. dictoresno's Avatar
    i refuse to read or watch anything that Faux News puts out.
    11-12-11 10:40 PM
  3. Michelle Haag's Avatar
    Here's the blahblahblah from Fox.

    Black Future For Blackberry? A Tech History Lesson For RIM | Fox News

    Here today, dot-gone tomorrow?

    Once high-flying RIM, the maker of the very popular Blackberry line of smartphones, is today fighting for its very survival, battling to keep its core business in the face of a string of service outages and far-cooler technology from its competitors.

    The company's problems seem to be growing: A Bloomberg report last week highlighted the company's struggling stock price, calling RIM "a wounded puppy." This week, Google announced it would end support for its Gmail app on Blackberry handhelds.

    In the light of these market challenges, we look at six other one-time tech juggernauts that went from heavyweight to scrap heap. Is there a lesson to be learned in history?

    Wang

    History: At its peak in the 80s, computer giant Wang was a billion dollar company with tens of thousands of employees. Wang moved from calculators and word processors into the computer market, making a very popular word processing program and leading in the early mainframe-class computer world.

    What happened: The personal computer market consolidated around "IBM-compatible" systems: cheap Windows-powered computers, while Wang PCs ran a proprietary operating system too focused on mere word processing. Meanwhile the mainframe market consolidated around far more powerful "big iron" servers by competitors like IBM. The mid-range market Wang occupied simply dried up.

    Lesson: Know your market. And if that market is shifting, business needs to shift accordingly.

    Lotus

    History: Lotus turned the early personal computing world on its ear with its Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet app, which helped prove why a personal computer was worth having on every desk. The company owned the market for years, and Lotus Notes, the company's Microsoft Office-like collaboration suite, helped cement Lotus' tremendous success in the software market.

    What happened: In a word, Microsoft. The popularity of the Windows platform and the software Microsoft built to run on it contributed to Lotus' slumping sales. The company struggled to keep pace, buying and branding other software programs to compete, but a version of its software built for Windows 95 was too little, too late.

    Lesson: Beware of the smaller, more agile company. But also beware the big guy who'll steal your money and eat your lunch.

    Palm/Handspring

    History: Everyone remembers the Palm Pilot, a spin off from 3Com that basically created the market for personal digital assistants (PDAs). Palm inventor Jeff Hawkins left to create Handspring, which turned the PDA into a portable computer and blew open the market. Along the way the two companies helped to create the vibrant smartphone market.

    What happened: Handspring was reabsorbed back into Palm, which struggled to update its operating system for years without success. By the time Palm brought out WebOS, the modern version of its smartphone platform, it was too late.

    Lesson: DO mess with success. Without continued innovation, companies flounder.

    AOL:

    History: The name America Online is for many synonymous with Internet access. Those ubiquitous floppy disks and CDs -- distributed in seemingly every magazine and mailed out across the nation -- introduced us to the World Wide Web, not to mention email. For many people, AOL's website WAS the Internet.

    What happened: Despite as many as 30 million users at one point, cheaper dial-up accounts from other companies ate into AOL's profits. And as Netscape and Internet Explorer browsers offered access to the entire Internet, the company's web portal suffered.

    Lesson: Looks can be deceiving. Despite shrinking in size over the years, AOL still operates one of the world's most popular websites and has millions of customers. The company earned $191.9 million from subscribers in the third quarter of 2011 -- 36 percent of total revenues.

    Kodak/Polaroid

    History: Polaroid's invention of the instant film camera in the 50s transformed photography, making it a fun pastime consumers could all cheaply and immediately enjoy. Kodak has a much longer history: Founder George Eastman invented roll film in the late 1800s, and his company dominated the camera market for decades.

    What happened: No one could predict how quickly digital cameras were to transform the photography business -- but both Kodak and Polaroid were far too slow to catch on. Kodak has continued research and development, and still earns billions thanks to digital camera sales, yet the company has struggled, seeing its stock delisted and share prices slump.

    Lesson: Watch the trends. These are companies that failed to see an emerging market before it hit them over the head.

    U.S. Robotics

    History: If you wanted to get online in the 80s and early 90s, odds are good you owned a modem from U.S. Robotics. The company was largely responsible for pushing the Internet access market forward, developing proprietary technologies that meant faster and faster modems -- and continued product sales.

    What happened: The V.90 standard for modems meant an end to U.S. Robotics proprietary forms of online access, and the market for modems dried up as consumers switched first to DSL access and then to cable (both using modems that came from the carrier, not the local hardware shop). The company still exists -- and still makes modems.

    Lesson: Success doesn't always mean victory.

    Read more: Black Future For Blackberry? A Tech History Lesson For RIM | Fox News
    Mexiko#CB likes this.
    11-12-11 10:46 PM
  4. jhimmel's Avatar
    Silly that they mention Google pulling the Gmail app, when there is a Gmail plugin that makes the app unnecessary and mostly unused. I'm not saying everything about the article is wrong, but they should have stuck to what they know.
    11-12-11 10:46 PM
  5. iN8ter's Avatar
    The plugin isnt as good as an app. Blame google for their unorthodox way of handing email. Stuff like priority inbox isn't supported by that plugin, unless I'm mistaken.

    Its also a slap in the face because it came like a week after they released an iOS app... iOS is able to sync to Google via activesync.

    Sent from my SGH-T959 using Tapatalk
    11-13-11 12:07 AM
  6. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I could care less about a Gmail app. Gmail via BIS is fine. It behaves well with Outlook also.

    I've never used a Gmail app or Gmail plug-in, and my default email is Gmail.
    11-13-11 12:11 AM
  7. EveryApp Mobile's Avatar
    I don't think it's bye-bye for blackberry but they have the most important point correct: "Lesson: Know your market. And if that market is shifting, business needs to shift accordingly.
    "
    I was completely baffeled when RIM released the torch 9800 with a 624 mhz processor while there where phones on the market with 1.0 ghz already. That was just one of the problems.
    Last edited by EveryApp Mobile; 11-13-11 at 12:30 AM.
    11-13-11 12:25 AM
  8. 00stryder's Avatar
    The plugin isnt as good as an app. Blame google for their unorthodox way of handing email. Stuff like priority inbox isn't supported by that plugin, unless I'm mistaken.

    Its also a slap in the face because it came like a week after they released an iOS app... iOS is able to sync to Google via activesync.

    Sent from my SGH-T959 using Tapatalk
    True, but remember that same iOS app had major issues out of the gate and Apply subsequently threw Google under the bus for it (nevermind the fact that for it to be in the App Store to begin with, Apple's own QC people should have been all over it). But c'est la vie...
    11-13-11 12:27 AM
  9. CommanderElvis's Avatar
    Fox news driving share prices down so friends can profit? Who'da thunk it.
    11-13-11 01:12 AM
  10. BOLD_AND_BRAVE's Avatar
    Blackberry really needs to get a PR firm to get a grip on all the negative publicity being generated by articles like these and news articles.

    They should atleast release some videos showing progress of the BBX systems or some sort of teaser video. Anything to help act as damage control for all the negative publicity they are experiencing.

    Sent from my BlackBerry 9780 using Tapatalk
    mud314 and petaf like this.
    11-13-11 02:00 AM
  11. kevinnugent's Avatar
    To be fair, they didn't lie in any of this. They could have been a lot harsher.
    11-13-11 05:48 AM
  12. melb_me's Avatar
    My first comment: "You watch Fox News? BAAHHHAAA!" Some people are funny.
    00stryder likes this.
    11-13-11 06:44 AM
  13. Dapper37's Avatar
    To be fair, they didn't lie in any of this. They could have been a lot harsher.
    Kev, your the guy we look to for fairness. We don't Need you to inform us of what we already know, even if (big if, more like exaggeration) everything they state is true, like RIM is so much like Kodak, Right! They never once proclaim all the new inovations from RIM over the past year. There have been many. ***** like Fox News think RIM is static, their for the product they sell today are the same they will sell tomorrow, You are in the company you chose! The ignorant (ignorant is lack of knowledge not a slag)...
    11-13-11 06:52 AM
  14. blackrocker's Avatar
    I wont dispute or defend the article, but I am of the age that I have personally witnessed all 6 of these giants rise to fame and hit the ground hard, Mickey Rourke style. I think the article hit the nail on the head.
    11-13-11 06:56 AM
  15. the_sleuth's Avatar
    RIM will muddle along much like Nokia. But as prior market leader, it was their crown to lose. They did not take their competition seriously back in 2007-09. Meanwhile iOS and Android kept improving.

    Only about a third of Americans use a smartphone and there are larger growth opportunities in foreign markets. RIM is far from dead. The market is large enough for 3 or 4 smartphone platforms.
    11-13-11 06:57 AM
  16. Fat Bastage's Avatar
    They should atleast release some videos showing progress of the BBX systems or some sort of teaser video. Anything to help act as damage control for all the negative publicity they are experiencing. lk
    They tried this with the playbook. The stock jumped. We RIM fans got all hyped thinking it was a true iPad challenger only to be disappointed. I say a better idea is to release compelling products now and stop bamboozling everyone with fluff.
    11-13-11 07:31 AM
  17. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Typical of any news venue, it's not quite accurate or relevant. For instance, Kodak has been one of the leaders in digital photography from the beginning.

    Were Fox to not jump on the bandwagon bashing RIM would have been a surprise. They, like all news media, are in business to deliver what their customers want.
    11-13-11 07:36 AM
  18. Danf's Avatar
    The key to understanding the whole article is found in the first paragraph.

    Once high-flying RIM, the maker of the very popular Blackberry line of smartphones, is today fighting for its very survival, battling to keep its core business in the face of a string of service outages and far-cooler technology from its competitors.
    That is why RIM gets bashed so much, it's not "cool" anymore. And for a large percentage of the smartphone user population it's about "cool". Both in having what is perceived as the "latest and greatest" tech and having what your "cool" friends have.

    Read some of the posts of current BB users that want to switch their statements are telling, "I won't fall behind technologically", "all my friends have.....", "my friends phone can....."
    11-13-11 08:06 AM
  19. sleepngbear's Avatar
    Typical of any news venue, it's not quite accurate or relevant. For instance, Kodak has been one of the leaders in digital photography from the beginning.

    Were Fox to not jump on the bandwagon bashing RIM would have been a surprise. They, like all news media, are in business to deliver what their customers want.
    Gotta disagree with the last part of this ... they're in business to drive up viewer ratings and web page hits. For proof of this, I give you ... Geraldo.
    11-13-11 08:23 AM
  20. melb_me's Avatar
    The key to understanding the whole article is found in the first paragraph.



    That is why RIM gets bashed so much, it's not "cool" anymore. And for a large percentage of the smartphone user population it's about "cool". Both in having what is perceived as the "latest and greatest" tech and having what your "cool" friends have.

    Read some of the posts of current BB users that want to switch their statements are telling, "I won't fall behind technologically", "all my friends have.....", "my friends phone can....."
    Excellent analysis. Iphone is like a fad, all the kids have to have it. It's like shopping trends for clothing, things come into fashion and go out of fashion. It really has a massive effect on sales regardless of the utility of the device. No Iphone = No coolness. It's like crows collecting shiny things its human nature. Apple is the master at creating buzz for their products.
    11-13-11 08:30 AM
  21. lnichols's Avatar
    If RIM can get BBX handhelds to market in a timely fashion (I don't know if they can or if that point has passed), and provide everything that Blackberry OS did/does great, with Android Player and the multiple ways to get apps, and if people in the US are willing to give them a second shot, then they will be fine. Lot of if statements and RIM, like Palm, RIM may have slept at the wheel too long without delivering new OS and addressing the market's desires. Only time will tell at this point. But seeing all the great new games that are finally coming out for the Playbook (Dead Space, N.O.V.A, and just yesterday Madden2012), and knowing that these games will port to the phones, and seeing what BBX is going to do soon, I think it is safe to say that the OS will be the best on the market. The question is will this combined with superior security be enough to get businesses and consumers back in the US?

    I'll be sticking with RIM for a while. They fit my needs of reliable comms (even with the recent outage), frugality of data usage while traveling overseas for business, and it just works well out of the box with no tinkering (even though I'm an engineer, I really don't want to mess with technology in my personal time as work gives me plenty of troubleshooting/tinkering time). Hopefully all of these qualities remain in BBX.
    11-13-11 08:35 AM
  22. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Gotta disagree with the last part of this ... they're in business to drive up viewer ratings and web page hits. For proof of this, I give you ... Geraldo.
    Exactly my point Ed. Delivering what the customer wants drives business.
    11-13-11 08:48 AM
  23. jhimmel's Avatar
    I could care less about a Gmail app. Gmail via BIS is fine. It behaves well with Outlook also.

    I've never used a Gmail app or Gmail plug-in, and my default email is Gmail.
    The plug-in is automatic now when you set up a BIS Gmail account on you Blackberry. Works well, and makes the Gmail app pretty much pointless. I don't know anyone who uses it, which is probably why Google didn't see any reason for it to exist any more. That part is a non-story. Many will read that article and come away with the impression that Gmail accounts will be trouble on BB's. I know it's a minor point in the story, just wanted to point it out.
    11-13-11 08:58 AM
  24. pantlesspenguin's Avatar
    Excellent analysis. Iphone is like a fad, all the kids have to have it. It's like shopping trends for clothing, things come into fashion and go out of fashion. It really has a massive effect on sales regardless of the utility of the device. No Iphone = No coolness. It's like crows collecting shiny things its human nature. Apple is the master at creating buzz for their products.
    Disagree with this somewhat. iPhones and iPods are really becoming more business oriented, in my experience. Or I should say, users are developing more into business tools. I just quit my job for another and on Friday some coworkers had a lil going away party for me. There were some folk there who work in sales who used to be in my dept, and one had her iPad with her. I knew the company had released iPhone/iPad apps that run some of our web products. I was curious to see how mobile apps could handle the platforms. My friend did a demo of them, and I was thoroughly impressed. It made me think that if this is just one company's apps, how much more useful content is out there for iOS?

    ANYWAY, so I don't derail this topic, I think the article does make SOME valid points but it's way to early to compare RIM with some of those companies. And I think it's really sad that the general public WANTS to hear nothing but doom and gloom for RIM's future.
    petaf likes this.
    11-13-11 09:20 AM
  25. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Disagree with this somewhat. iPhones and iPods are really becoming more business oriented, in my experience. Or I should say, users are developing more into business tools. I just quit my job for another and on Friday some coworkers had a lil going away party for me. There were some folk there who work in sales who used to be in my dept, and one had her iPad with her. I knew the company had released iPhone/iPad apps that run some of our web products. I was curious to see how mobile apps could handle the platforms. My friend did a demo of them, and I was thoroughly impressed. It made me think that if this is just one company's apps, how much more useful content is out there for iOS?

    ANYWAY, so I don't derail this topic, I think the article does make SOME valid points but it's way to early to compare RIM with some of those companies. And I think it's really sad that the general public WANTS to hear nothing but doom and gloom for RIM's future.
    That's it in a nutshell.
    11-13-11 09:36 AM
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