01-27-17 01:33 AM
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  1. ppeters914's Avatar
    The Internet....

    If someone writes it, someone will believe it.
    Edward Snowden criticizes BlackBerry for its stance on privacy-dont-believe-everything-you-see-internet.jpg
    01-20-17 01:34 PM
  2. Villain's Avatar
    it's Edward Snowden. no loss
    01-20-17 03:51 PM
  3. wermar's Avatar
    If Snowden says BlackBerry is not secure, I believe him, no matter how many denials from BlackBerry .

    Posted via CB10
    ssbtech likes this.
    01-20-17 06:31 PM
  4. anon(2313227)'s Avatar
    Weren't all those "breaches" a case of bad reused passwords?
    It was the failure to set limit on how many time a password is tried, so design flaw. they changed it since then.
    01-20-17 07:15 PM
  5. martinjdub's Avatar
    SNOWDEN:

    Gets a job and Burger King, surprised they serve burgers, gets a new job at McDonalds, more beef, wtf!?! Turns vegan, releases Colonel Sanders' KFC Recipe, moves to Russia in exile with the Hamburglar.

    Super tool
    CNX66 likes this.
    01-20-17 08:03 PM
  6. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    SNOWDEN:

    Gets a job and Burger King, surprised they serve burgers, gets a new job at McDonalds, more beef, wtf!?! Turns vegan, releases Colonel Sanders' KFC Recipe, moves to Russia in exile with the Hamburglar.

    Super tool
    The NSA was directly asked by Congress if they were surveilling US citizens or people inside the US (which, by law, they aren't allowed to do). The NSA said "no, we aren't." In fact, NSA was tracking more US citizens inside the US than all others combined. They have a massive database hooked into credit card companies, phone companies, social media, and on and on (including voice calls that have been transcribed via voice recognition). It's almost certain that YOU are in that database.

    Snowden exposed the fact that NSA and other agencies were breaking the law, and not just breaking it occasionally, but systematically and on a scale that is mind-boggling. For that, the US government wants to charge him with the Espionage Act, which means life in prison or death - even though he was just exposing (very carefully, to avoid revealing secrets that would directly compromise agents or informants in the field) the fact that these agencies who are supposed to be working FOR us are in fact working AGAINST us and against the law.

    Yes, he had to flee or be put in prison for life/be executed. He didn't have many options of where to go, and Russia was not his intended destination. But it needs to be understood the risk he took to TELL THE TRUTH when no one else would. The man is a patriot, and doesn't deserve your ire. George Washington was a traitor and a rebel too (if you took the British point of view).
    01-20-17 08:28 PM
  7. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Snowden is in Russia only because the government of his own country wants to punish him for exposing evidence that they conduct mass surveillance on their own citizens, too.

    Posted from my Q10 via CB10
    What Snowden exposed was evolutionary, not revolutionary. Ever heard of Echelon or Carnivore?
    01-20-17 09:20 PM
  8. Emaderton3's Avatar
    The NSA was directly asked by Congress if they were surveilling US citizens or people inside the US (which, by law, they aren't allowed to do). The NSA said "no, we aren't." In fact, NSA was tracking more US citizens inside the US than all others combined. They have a massive database hooked into credit card companies, phone companies, social media, and on and on (including voice calls that have been transcribed via voice recognition). It's almost certain that YOU are in that database.

    Snowden exposed the fact that NSA and other agencies were breaking the law, and not just breaking it occasionally, but systematically and on a scale that is mind-boggling. For that, the US government wants to charge him with the Espionage Act, which means life in prison or death - even though he was just exposing (very carefully, to avoid revealing secrets that would directly compromise agents or informants in the field) the fact that these agencies who are supposed to be working FOR us are in fact working AGAINST us and against the law.

    Yes, he had to flee or be put in prison for life/be executed. He didn't have many options of where to go, and Russia was not his intended destination. But it needs to be understood the risk he took to TELL THE TRUTH when no one else would. The man is a patriot, and doesn't deserve your ire. George Washington was a traitor and a rebel too (if you took the British point of view).
    This is the narrative I have heard as well. But within the US government, who has been deemed accountable for this?

    Posted via CB10
    01-20-17 09:41 PM
  9. anon(9721108)'s Avatar
    The NSA was directly asked by Congress if they were surveilling US citizens or people inside the US (which, by law, they aren't allowed to do). The NSA said "no, we aren't." In fact, NSA was tracking more US citizens inside the US than all others combined. They have a massive database hooked into credit card companies, phone companies, social media, and on and on (including voice calls that have been transcribed via voice recognition). It's almost certain that YOU are in that database.

    Snowden exposed the fact that NSA and other agencies were breaking the law, and not just breaking it occasionally, but systematically and on a scale that is mind-boggling. For that, the US government wants to charge him with the Espionage Act, which means life in prison or death - even though he was just exposing (very carefully, to avoid revealing secrets that would directly compromise agents or informants in the field) the fact that these agencies who are supposed to be working FOR us are in fact working AGAINST us and against the law.

    Yes, he had to flee or be put in prison for life/be executed. He didn't have many options of where to go, and Russia was not his intended destination. But it needs to be understood the risk he took to TELL THE TRUTH when no one else would. The man is a patriot, and doesn't deserve your ire. George Washington was a traitor and a rebel too (if you took the British point of view).
    He also SIGNED a contract with the US Government and he broke it. You think the US is the only country that spies on its people?

    Now who knows what info he is giving the Russians regarding Western defences and all the allies have to be concerned about this as well!

    -sent from a beautiful Bold 9900
    BigBadWulf and shaleem like this.
    01-20-17 11:09 PM
  10. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    He also SIGNED a contract with the US Government and he broke it. You think the US is the only country that spies on its people?

    Now who knows what info he is giving the Russians regarding Western defences and all the allies have to be concerned about this as well!

    -sent from a beautiful Bold 9900
    Furthermore, behind closed doors, the answer would undoubtedly been quite different, and asking it probably completely unnecessary. I cannot believe their feigned ignorance was anything more than political posturing.
    01-20-17 11:14 PM
  11. anon(9721108)'s Avatar
    Furthermore, behind closed doors, the answer would undoubtedly been quite different, and asking it probably completely unnecessary. I cannot believe their feigned ignorance was anything more than political posturing.
    Everyone knew about the government spying when Bush brought in the Patriot Act. Not long after FBI agents were actually caught abusing the powers and listening in on their ex-wives telephone conversations. (plenty of links if you want to search that on Google) I wouldn't doubt if this was common practice long before the Patriot Act era. Not too suprising or earth-shaking imo.



    -sent from a beautiful Bold 9900
    BigBadWulf likes this.
    01-20-17 11:23 PM
  12. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Everyone knew about the government spying when Bush brought in the Patriot Act. Not long after FBI agents were actually caught abusing the powers and listening in on their ex-wives telephone conversations. (plenty of links if you want to search that on Google) I wouldn't doubt if this was common practice long before the Patriot Act era. Not too suprising or earth-shaking imo.



    -sent from a beautiful Bold 9900
    Exactly!
    01-20-17 11:35 PM
  13. keithhackneysmullet's Avatar
    The NSA was directly asked by Congress if they were surveilling US citizens or people inside the US (which, by law, they aren't allowed to do). The NSA said "no, we aren't." In fact, NSA was tracking more US citizens inside the US than all others combined. They have a massive database hooked into credit card companies, phone companies, social media, and on and on (including voice calls that have been transcribed via voice recognition). It's almost certain that YOU are in that database.

    Snowden exposed the fact that NSA and other agencies were breaking the law, and not just breaking it occasionally, but systematically and on a scale that is mind-boggling. For that, the US government wants to charge him with the Espionage Act, which means life in prison or death - even though he was just exposing (very carefully, to avoid revealing secrets that would directly compromise agents or informants in the field) the fact that these agencies who are supposed to be working FOR us are in fact working AGAINST us and against the law.

    Yes, he had to flee or be put in prison for life/be executed. He didn't have many options of where to go, and Russia was not his intended destination. But it needs to be understood the risk he took to TELL THE TRUTH when no one else would. The man is a patriot, and doesn't deserve your ire. George Washington was a traitor and a rebel too (if you took the British point of view).
    Could not have said it better
    01-21-17 01:54 AM
  14. itsyaboy's Avatar
    Remember Etisalat? BlackBerry has a long history of cooperating with lawful requests of private information, whilst Snowden has chosen to get cozy with a government that has a long history of invading their citizen's privacy, Which one do you trust?
    The problem is the word lawful. Whether a lawful request is ethically sound is, today and tomorrow, the bigger question we need to concern ourselves with. Laws are currently changing to make cybersecurity capabilities more invasive and more controlling. So the word lawful, in my opinion, doesn't mean a lot anymore. And then I am even disregarding the illegal requests, which surely will also be made.

    Posted via CB10
    01-21-17 01:58 AM
  15. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    The problem is the word lawful. Whether a lawful request is ethically sound is, today and tomorrow, the bigger question we need to concern ourselves with. Laws are currently changing to make cybersecurity capabilities more invasive and more controlling. So the word lawful, in my opinion, doesn't mean a lot anymore. And then I am even disregarding the illegal requests, which surely will also be made.

    Posted via CB10
    I didn't say I agreed or condoned, but lawful they still are. You would prefer BlackBerry spend what little they have left, fighting city hall?
    01-21-17 06:24 AM
  16. itsyaboy's Avatar
    I didn't say I agreed or condoned, but lawful they still are. You would prefer BlackBerry spend what little they have left, fighting city hall?
    I didn't say whether you agreed or condoned it. I was just saying I feel that the word lawful is a word losing more meaning every day. Neither did I say that it is up to BlackBerry to fight these laws. The question would be, who should fight for human rights? In theory, politicians make laws that are beneficial to its society. Obviously this isn't how it is happening. Can companies pick a fight with them on their own? Probably not, although it is good for PR and marketing purposes (see Apple). I think BlackBerry should definitely do more, in light of their blog posts where they so proudly state their commitment to privacy. I think their commitment is non-existent. Which is fine, as it is a difficult topic and BlackBerry alone couldn't really change anything, but they could at least be honest about it. Their commitment doesn't extend to consumers.

    What should happen is that resistance comes from multiple stakeholders, thus mainly consumers, cybersecurity experts and cybersecurity companies etc.. but without consumers giving a damn, at least collectively, it is all quite hopeless.

    Posted via CB10
    BigBadWulf likes this.
    01-21-17 06:34 AM
  17. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    I didn't say whether you agreed or condoned it. I was just saying I feel that the word lawful is a word losing more meaning every day. Neither did I say that it is up to BlackBerry to fight these laws. The question would be, who should fight for human rights? In theory, politicians make laws that are beneficial to its society. Obviously this isn't how it is happening. Can companies pick a fight with them on their own? Probably not, although it is good for PR and marketing purposes (see Apple). I think BlackBerry should definitely do more, in light of their blog posts where they so proudly state their commitment to privacy. I think their commitment is non-existent. Which is fine, as it is a difficult topic and BlackBerry alone couldn't really change anything, but they could at least be honest about it. Their commitment doesn't extend to consumers.

    What should happen is that resistance comes from multiple stakeholders, thus mainly consumers, cybersecurity experts and cybersecurity companies etc.. but without consumers giving a damn, at least collectively, it is all quite hopeless.

    Posted via CB10
    Unfortunately, continuing to debate this will lead to deep political discussion, so I'll leave it with these few comments, and bow out...

    Apple definitely used their grandstanding to great marketing success. Being the phone in question was government provided, I felt their resistance completely unwarranted. In other less notable cases, they and I would be in agreement.

    Voting has consequences, with who makes and passes laws, and those who judge the constitutionality of them. The low information voter and single issue voter, have a lot to do with where we find ourselves today. Companies can only do so much to combat that.

    I think we're pretty much in agreement on the overall privacy issue.
    01-21-17 07:38 AM
  18. itsyaboy's Avatar
    Unfortunately, continuing to debate this will lead to deep political discussion, so I'll leave it with these few comments, and bow out...

    Apple definitely used their grandstanding to great marketing success. Being the phone in question was government provided, I felt their resistance completely unwarranted. In other less notable cases, they and I would be in agreement.

    Voting has consequences, with who makes and passes laws, and those who judge the constitutionality of them. The low information voter and single issue voter, have a lot to do with where we find ourselves today. Companies can only do so much to combat that.

    I think we're pretty much in agreement on the overall privacy issue.
    Good idea and yes, think we do agree!

    Posted via CB10
    BigBadWulf likes this.
    01-21-17 08:03 AM
  19. fschmeck's Avatar
    Did he post this on his Facebook account?

    I'm under no illusions about BlackBerry being somehow bulletproof, but the Snowden train kind of stopped when he decided Russia was a good place to tell everyone else how evil they are...

    Posted via CB10
    01-21-17 10:54 AM
  20. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    For that, the US government wants to charge him with the Espionage Act, which means life in prison or death - even though he was just exposing (very carefully, to avoid revealing secrets that would directly compromise agents or informants in the field) [...]
    ^This

    Snowden didn't give the information to China, Russia or Iran or a dubious organisation like Wikileaks.

    He gave the information (on encrypted media) to some highly reputable representatives of the Fourth Estate and continued his journey with empty hands.

    The information from Snowden was later redacted before release, see for example:
    https://theintercept.com/2016/05/16/...s-for-release/

    And if I remember correctly in some cases even representatives of the (concerned) government reviewed tne articles before release.


    Yeah, so according to the law, Snowden is technically a traitor, but to me it looks like the law is totally broken.

    Nobody got hurt, no "constitutional" operation was compromised.
    The Snowden leaks are a textbook example for responsible whistleblowing.

    I am sure there are plenty of examples in the US history how you should *not* leak sensitive information, the Plame affair was one of them.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plame_affair

    So, to me Snowden is a patriot.

    I would not agree with everything he says, though.
    I don't think that people have stopped using BlackBerry handsets, just because RIM is so close with governments.
    The majority was just not happy with BBOS and never tried BB10.
    I really wish he would be right with this, but in case of BlackBerry the new OS (BB10) came just too late in the market and BBOS had no future.
    Troy Tiscareno likes this.
    01-21-17 04:20 PM
  21. Old_Mil's Avatar
    The NSA was directly asked by Congress if they were surveilling US citizens or people inside the US (which, by law, they aren't allowed to do). The NSA said "no, we aren't." In fact, NSA was tracking more US citizens inside the US than all others combined. They have a massive database hooked into credit card companies, phone companies, social media, and on and on (including voice calls that have been transcribed via voice recognition). It's almost certain that YOU are in that database.

    Snowden exposed the fact that NSA and other agencies were breaking the law, and not just breaking it occasionally, but systematically and on a scale that is mind-boggling. For that, the US government wants to charge him with the Espionage Act, which means life in prison or death - even though he was just exposing (very carefully, to avoid revealing secrets that would directly compromise agents or informants in the field) the fact that these agencies who are supposed to be working FOR us are in fact working AGAINST us and against the law.

    Yes, he had to flee or be put in prison for life/be executed. He didn't have many options of where to go, and Russia was not his intended destination. But it needs to be understood the risk he took to TELL THE TRUTH when no one else would. The man is a patriot, and doesn't deserve your ire. George Washington was a traitor and a rebel too (if you took the British point of view).
    You are absolutely correct. These people need to watch the documentary killswitch.

    Snowden's flight to Russia only came after several other whistleblowers were hammered by the government for doing the right thing.
    01-22-17 12:10 AM
  22. rthonpm's Avatar
    like the Backdoor access with RCMP.
    Which wasn't a backdoor: BlackBerry controls and generates the key to consumer BBM so using that key doesn't create a backdoor: it's using something you already own and control. If there was a method to bypass or override that master key, that would be a backdoor.

    Having that key puts BlackBerry in a tough position: it's in possession of something that can decode messages sent through their servers, which means that a warrant can be issued for access to that key in some form or fashion.
    01-22-17 03:59 PM
  23. thurask's Avatar
    Having that key puts BlackBerry in a tough position: it's in possession of something that can decode messages sent through their servers, which means that a warrant can be issued for access to that key in some form or fashion.
    End-to-end encryption (i.e. BBM Enterprise/Protected) means that there's no possibility for the provider to be such a middleman with respect to encrypted messages, but something tells me that's only a "tough" position for users and not BlackBerry.
    rthonpm likes this.
    01-22-17 04:21 PM
  24. sorinv's Avatar
    The NSA was directly asked by Congress if they were surveilling US citizens or people inside the US (which, by law, they aren't allowed to do). The NSA said "no, we aren't." In fact, NSA was tracking more US citizens inside the US than all others combined. They have a massive database hooked into credit card companies, phone companies, social media, and on and on (including voice calls that have been transcribed via voice recognition). It's almost certain that YOU are in that database.

    Snowden exposed the fact that NSA and other agencies were breaking the law, and not just breaking it occasionally, but systematically and on a scale that is mind-boggling. For that, the US government wants to charge him with the Espionage Act, which means life in prison or death - even though he was just exposing (very carefully, to avoid revealing secrets that would directly compromise agents or informants in the field) the fact that these agencies who are supposed to be working FOR us are in fact working AGAINST us and against the law.

    Yes, he had to flee or be put in prison for life/be executed. He didn't have many options of where to go, and Russia was not his intended destination. But it needs to be understood the risk he took to TELL THE TRUTH when no one else would. The man is a patriot, and doesn't deserve your ire. George Washington was a traitor and a rebel too (if you took the British point of view).
    Well written!

    Posted via CB10
    01-22-17 11:47 PM
  25. ImOfficial007's Avatar
    What Snowden exposed was evolutionary, not revolutionary. Ever heard of Echelon or Carnivore?
    But wasn't echelon used to spy Soviet connections and not their own citizens? There are some doubts about it though. And it was also speculated that X-Keyscore has unlimited resources at it's disposal to cary out any kind of search on almost anyone.
    01-27-17 01:33 AM
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