07-07-16 04:19 PM
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tools
  1. GenghisKahn2011's Avatar
    Does it really matter how many steps it takes? What's the difference, 2 seconds?
    Have you ever observed how much can be done in two seconds?

    When the right tools are in the hands of someone quite aware of the value of time, seconds of time gain stunningly immense value!


    BlackBerry Passport Silver Edition 10.3.2.2876 on T-Mobile
    01-05-16 09:56 PM
  2. Bbnivende's Avatar
    Except I'm talking about who will control the digital workspace as the next horizon in mobile computing, not the digital playspace. The iPhone was created as a personal computer that fit into your pocket, but it has morphed into something completely different in terms of how it is actually used. iOS was intended to work cross device with the capability to the run desktop apps. But it has not fully succeeded in this regard...yet. The closest thing they have is the iPad pro which is far from revolutionary. As for Android...they have essentially replicated Apple's strategy with a cheaper and more universally accessible alternative. Therefore I see what Microsoft is doing with Windows 10 to be highly underestimated. Particularly once hardware builders begin shipping out mobile units running x86 and x64 capable processors. This is where I believe BlackBerry could make a huge impact, bridging their hardware/software security know-how with the new productivity mobile workspace. For the time being at least, it appears they are more concerned about generating cash flow from their hardware division by re-packaging Samsung hardware for Google...and writing software for cars. But we will see...

    Posted via CB10
    I read somewhere that Microsoft phones and computers would not need a BlackBerry MDM solution.
    01-05-16 11:11 PM
  3. crucial bbq's Avatar
    I was BB10 user(Passport) and what I was reading whole last year on CB that BB10 lacking apps and eco system.
    Now I have switched to Priv(Android) and I am on hunt to find basic apps like Explorer, Video, Gallery etc..
    I think hundreds of apps were installed and removed. Almost all apps having different issues, I installed many Explorers and some need seconds to index files and some crashes most of the times. I am even ready to buy apps to get rid of stupid and annoying ads but didn't find reliable apps to spend my money. BB10 is way perfect for normal needs and efficiency. For me apps issue is just a hype excluding professional apps banking etc.

    Posted via Priv...
    You are missing the point of Android completely: it's not about the number of decent apps that fit your needs, it is about the number of total apps and how many of them are free. Period.
    GadgetTravel likes this.
    01-05-16 11:25 PM
  4. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    You are missing the point of Android completely: it's not about the number of decent apps that fit your needs, it is about the number of total apps and how many of them are free. Period.
    Exactly. And iOS is similar. Any type of convention, transit system, or what have you has an app now and it is almost alway iOS and Android, not BB 10. There are 1000s of these specialized apps that people use and BB10 is not in that space
    01-05-16 11:38 PM
  5. tufcustomer's Avatar
    Not at all and that is fine by me!

    My ego is not governed by 'likes' and 'followers.'



    BlackBerry Passport Silver Edition 10.3.2.2876 on T-Mobile
    Okay?

    Posted via CB10
    01-05-16 11:42 PM
  6. darkehawke's Avatar
    Okay?

    Posted via CB10
    I think he was making a point (not a very good one) that he doesnt care about facebook so it's failings on BB10 is irrelevant.
    While that may be true for him, it isnt for many others.

    And as for the argument over the damn file manager, I left BB10 and went to the Moto X. Took me 4 months to notice the lack of file manager. Took me 2 seconds to remedy. It's pointless and desperate issue here for some reason
    01-06-16 12:11 AM
  7. BB_PP's Avatar
    You are missing the point of Android completely: it's not about the number of decent apps that fit your needs, it is about the number of total apps and how many of them are free. Period.
    Will you take trash for free?

    Posted via Priv...
    dmlis likes this.
    01-06-16 03:06 AM
  8. BB_PP's Avatar
    You are missing the point of Android completely: it's not about the number of decent apps that fit your needs, it is about the number of total apps and how many of them are free. Period.
    Android is not new for me, I have bought two other phones with Android and sold but there should be balance between fun and work

    Posted via Priv...
    01-06-16 03:09 AM
  9. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Does it really matter how many steps it takes? What's the difference, 2 seconds?
    Brain...k, wear and tear on your daily decision making capacity and attention span. Don't ridicule it. We only have as many units available on a daily basis, and saving a step helps one staying fresh for longer...

    I tap, hold, swipe and flick thousands of times every day. The easier, the more effortlessly we can navigate, the more attention we have left to stay focused on the more profitable and rewarding things that make us real money. If I'm really worn out and a decide to write "that invoice" "tomorrow", I might miss out on hundreds of dollars, should I forget...

    :-D

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    01-06-16 03:16 AM
  10. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Have you ever observed how much can be done in two seconds?

    When the right tools are in the hands of someone quite aware of the value of time, seconds of time gain stunningly immense value!


    BlackBerry Passport Silver Edition 10.3.2.2876 on T-Mobile
    Copy and paste a "Happy New Year" message to an important customer that might make you hundreds or more over the next 12 months...?

    :-)

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    01-06-16 03:25 AM
  11. TgeekB's Avatar
    Brain...k, wear and tear on your daily decision making capacity and attention span. Don't ridicule it. We only have as many units available on a daily basis, and saving a step helps one staying fresh for longer...

    I tap, hold, swipe and flick thousands of times every day. The easier, the more effortlessly we can navigate, the more attention we have left to stay focused on the more profitable and rewarding things that make us real money. If I'm really worn out and a decide to write "that invoice" "tomorrow", I might miss out on hundreds of dollars, should I forget...

    :-D

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    Oooooooook.
    01-06-16 06:48 AM
  12. Manchego25's Avatar
    I will always defend BB10 as the best OS out there for general UI, reliability and productivity. However, I think it is wrong to overlook the app ecosystem to the average consumer user. They tend not to use their phones for productivity but as a communication tool and as a device to access products and services they use. They use apps because they are convenient to install and, for most commercial apps, designed to encourage use. My wife has android and uses Spotify, Mobile Banking, Audible, Pinterest, Netflix and a few others on a very regular basis. I would say most of my friends who are not necessarily technologically savvy use similar 'big name' apps regularly.

    You can say what you will about how it is hype but let's be fair, consumers have grown accustomed to having these apps on their smartphones. Sure, some can run on the android runtime but they aren't as smooth or work as well as on an Android phone and I speak as someone who runs a few myself and I've compared them on my wife's android and my work iphone (don't ask). If you subscribe or use a service smoothly on a platform every day and are then being asked to move to another eco system where you can't use them... well, that makes it a difficult sell.

    That is why I think that BB were smart to focus on enterprise and business users since productivity is more valuable to their users. Let's not jump to the conclusion that an app ecosystem is not something that puts users off BB10 - it is important to a lot of consumers and at the end of the day, that expectation is what shifts phones.
    01-06-16 10:31 AM
  13. Emaderton3's Avatar
    I will always defend BB10 as the best OS out there for general UI, reliability and productivity. However, I think it is wrong to overlook the app ecosystem to the average consumer user. They tend not to use their phones for productivity but as a communication tool and as a device to access products and services they use. They use apps because they are convenient to install and, for most commercial apps, designed to encourage use. My wife has android and uses Spotify, Mobile Banking, Audible, Pinterest, Netflix and a few others on a very regular basis. I would say most of my friends who are not necessarily technologically savvy use similar 'big name' apps regularly.

    You can say what you will about how it is hype but let's be fair, consumers have grown accustomed to having these apps on their smartphones. Sure, some can run on the android runtime but they aren't as smooth or work as well as on an Android phone and I speak as someone who runs a few myself and I've compared them on my wife's android and my work iphone (don't ask). If you subscribe or use a service smoothly on a platform every day and are then being asked to move to another eco system where you can't use them... well, that makes it a difficult sell.

    That is why I think that BB were smart to focus on enterprise and business users since productivity is more valuable to their users. Let's not jump to the conclusion that an app ecosystem is not something that puts users off BB10 - it is important to a lot of consumers and at the end of the day, that expectation is what shifts phones.
    Exactly, but I would further argue that the ecosystem goes beyond apps. When I first got my Q10, I tried to show my iPhone using brother-in-law its functions. After laughing that I still had a BlackBerry, he said he would never switch from Apple. They have a rich, integrated ecosystem of different technologies that allows their family to share and monitor communications and media among their phones, iPads, computers, and Apple TV with ease. I couldn't argue with that.

    Posted via CB10
    01-06-16 10:58 AM
  14. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    I will always defend BB10 as the best OS out there for general UI, reliability and productivity. However, I think it is wrong to overlook the app ecosystem to the average consumer user. They tend not to use their phones for productivity but as a communication tool and as a device to access products and services they use. They use apps because they are convenient to install and, for most commercial apps, designed to encourage use. My wife has android and uses Spotify, Mobile Banking, Audible, Pinterest, Netflix and a few others on a very regular basis. I would say most of my friends who are not necessarily technologically savvy use similar 'big name' apps regularly.

    You can say what you will about how it is hype but let's be fair, consumers have grown accustomed to having these apps on their smartphones. Sure, some can run on the android runtime but they aren't as smooth or work as well as on an Android phone and I speak as someone who runs a few myself and I've compared them on my wife's android and my work iphone (don't ask). If you subscribe or use a service smoothly on a platform every day and are then being asked to move to another eco system where you can't use them... well, that makes it a difficult sell.

    That is why I think that BB were smart to focus on enterprise and business users since productivity is more valuable to their users. Let's not jump to the conclusion that an app ecosystem is not something that puts users off BB10 - it is important to a lot of consumers and at the end of the day, that expectation is what shifts phones.
    Tools not toys. It isn't real. The professionals have almost exclusively rejected BB10. Android and iOS allow me to be far more efficient at my job because of their apps.
    01-06-16 11:25 AM
  15. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    Exactly, but I would further argue that the ecosystem goes beyond apps. When I first got my Q10, I tried to show my iPhone using brother-in-law its functions. After laughing that I still had a BlackBerry, he said he would never switch from Apple. They have a rich, integrated ecosystem of different technologies that allows their family to share and monitor communications and media among their phones, iPads, computers, and Apple TV with ease. I couldn't argue with that.

    Posted via CB10
    Being able to share documents, slides etc across devices is enormously valuable.
    01-06-16 11:26 AM
  16. Bbnivende's Avatar
    I will always defend BB10 as the best OS out there for general UI, reliability and productivity. However, I think it is wrong to overlook the app ecosystem to the average consumer user. They tend not to use their phones for productivity but as a communication tool and as a device to access products and services they use. They use apps because they are convenient to install and, for most commercial apps, designed to encourage use. My wife has android and uses Spotify, Mobile Banking, Audible, Pinterest, Netflix and a few others on a very regular basis. I would say most of my friends who are not necessarily technologically savvy use similar 'big name' apps regularly.

    You can say what you will about how it is hype but let's be fair, consumers have grown accustomed to having these apps on their smartphones. Sure, some can run on the android runtime but they aren't as smooth or work as well as on an Android phone and I speak as someone who runs a few myself and I've compared them on my wife's android and my work iphone (don't ask). If you subscribe or use a service smoothly on a platform every day and are then being asked to move to another eco system where you can't use them... well, that makes it a difficult sell.

    That is why I think that BB were smart to focus on enterprise and business users since productivity is more valuable to their users. Let's not jump to the conclusion that an app ecosystem is not something that puts users off BB10 - it is important to a lot of consumers and at the end of the day, that expectation is what shifts phones.
    The days of enterprise and business users having a phone just for email and texting are are over. Most employees do not want a PKB phone and their employer is looking for a company wide solution. A relative of mine works for a very large company headquartered in Toronto. It had been 100 % BlackBerry but now all new phone contracts will be iOS.

    Let us not forget that many of these same enterprise customers have their own apps and they are Android and Apple.
    01-06-16 11:39 AM
  17. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    But that's if you believe one device does all those things faster, but that device doesn't exist. It all evens out in the wash, doesn't it?
    It sounds like that is working for you. For me, I want to get the most done on my mobile device as quickly as possible so I get get back to higher value activities. I want a device built for my specific use case, not a Swiss army knife that does a lot of things well but nothing great.

    I still use my BB10 phone essentially the way I used a Blackberry in 2007, with the addition of photography, video, Web browsing and Cloud storage. It's just a communication tool for when I'm away from my computer.

    Despite the hype, I've never really found a use for mobile apps beyond the native ones bundled BlackBerry. I own an iPad, and I've downloaded a couple of hundred apps on it to play with, but I spend less than an hour a week on it and it never leaves my house. The same is true of my Samsung Note. I've simply never found a mobile app that I need or want to use with any frequency.



    Posted via CB10
    01-06-16 11:46 AM
  18. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    People use file managers.
    Some people use file managers... especially power type users.

    But I know lot's of people that have become very accustom to how iOS (or Android) works without a real file manager. Personally I don't like it, and the way BB10 file manger works is about the closest I've seen to a Windows type experience.

    Here in our office, a number of people have started doing the same type of thing in Windows now. They are looking for a word document, they open MS Word and try to find it. A PDF, they open Adobe to find it first..... in a few years Windows just might loses Explore, who knows.
    Elephant_Canyon likes this.
    01-06-16 12:00 PM
  19. TgeekB's Avatar
    It sounds like that is working for you. For me, I want to get the most done on my mobile device as quickly as possible so I get get back to higher value activities. I want a device built for my specific use case, not a Swiss army knife that does a lot of things well but nothing great.

    I still use my BB10 phone essentially the way I used a Blackberry in 2007, with the addition of photography, video, Web browsing and Cloud storage. It's just a communication tool for when I'm away from my computer.

    Despite the hype, I've never really found a use for mobile apps beyond the native ones bundled BlackBerry. I own an iPad, and I've downloaded a couple of hundred apps on it to play with, but I spend less than an hour a week on it and it never leaves my house. The same is true of my Samsung Note. I've simply never found a mobile app that I need or want to use with any frequency.



    Posted via CB10
    I hope BB10 can stay around for a while for people like yourself. You are in the minority which makes it hard to remain viable. Most people want an all around device that can both entertain as well as communicate/do business. Apps are still a big part of normal smartphone usage for most.
    01-06-16 12:05 PM
  20. early2bed's Avatar
    Here in our office, a number of people have started doing the same type of thing in Windows now. They are looking for a word document, they open MS Word and try to find it. A PDF, they open Adobe to find it first..... in a few years Windows just might loses Explore, who knows.
    My kids are learning how to use computers without using files or directories. First of all, using extensions to figure out what a file contains is a bad system. It requires the user to learn what different extensions mean. It also encourages users to root around directories where they shouldn't ever look in. They have to know that .exe is a bad thing to click unless it's not a bad thing. Just having an extension doesn't guarantee compatibility with anything. Clicking on a file that the computer doesn't know what to do with or does the wrong thing with is a terrible user experience. Most operating systems are defaulted to hide extensions anyway.

    Getting rid of file management was a good decision for iOS. It won't be long before it will be a computer relic like the command line interface. Most people simply won't use them and those of us who do will will eventually fade away.
    Elephant_Canyon likes this.
    01-06-16 12:20 PM
  21. cbobb123's Avatar
    Have you ever observed how much can be done in two seconds?

    When the right tools are in the hands of someone quite aware of the value of time, seconds of time gain stunningly immense value!


    BlackBerry Passport Silver Edition 10.3.2.2876 on T-Mobile
    Yet you wasted your precious seconds on this post....

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    01-06-16 12:23 PM
  22. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    My kids are learning how to use computers without using files or directories. First of all, using extensions to figure out what a file contains is a bad system. It requires the user to learn what different extensions mean. It also encourages users to root around directories where they shouldn't ever look in. They have to know that .exe is a bad thing to click unless it's not a bad thing. Just having an extension doesn't guarantee compatibility with anything. Clicking on a file that the computer doesn't know what to do with or does the wrong thing with is a terrible user experience. Most operating systems are defaulted to hide extensions anyway.

    Getting rid of file management was a good decision for iOS. It won't be long before it will be a computer relic like the command line interface. Most people simply won't use them and those of us who do will will eventually fade away.
    If you think the command line has faded away, you're nuts. Sure most end users don't need that stuff, but for developers and power users the command line is still the best way to get lots of complex tasks done. The problem with dumbing down devices with GUIs is that then users are limited to doing the things that some developer or designer already thought about. That's fine for a lot of people, but it will always limit choices. That's easier to support, but it's much less powerful.

    The fact is that data is stored in files in directories on drives. That's how computers work. Designing a different interface is just makeup.

    Posted via CB10
    brookie229 and dmlis like this.
    01-06-16 12:59 PM
  23. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    It sounds like that is working for you. For me, I want to get the most done on my mobile device as quickly as possible so I get get back to higher value activities. I want a device built for my specific use case, not a Swiss army knife that does a lot of things well but nothing great.

    I still use my BB10 phone essentially the way I used a Blackberry in 2007, with the addition of photography, video, Web browsing and Cloud storage. It's just a communication tool for when I'm away from my computer.

    Despite the hype, I've never really found a use for mobile apps beyond the native ones bundled BlackBerry. I own an iPad, and I've downloaded a couple of hundred apps on it to play with, but I spend less than an hour a week on it and it never leaves my house. The same is true of my Samsung Note. I've simply never found a mobile app that I need or want to use with any frequency.


    The problem for BlackBerry is that there aren't enough people like you for it to be successful.

    Indeed, as has been noted before, it makes sense for an OS developer to cater to BOTH parties -- folks that employ apps and those that don't.
    TgeekB and MikeX74 like this.
    01-06-16 01:16 PM
  24. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Exactly, but I would further argue that the ecosystem goes beyond apps. When I first got my Q10, I tried to show my iPhone using brother-in-law its functions. After laughing that I still had a BlackBerry, he said he would never switch from Apple. They have a rich, integrated ecosystem of different technologies that allows their family to share and monitor communications and media among their phones, iPads, computers, and Apple TV with ease. I couldn't argue with that.

    Posted via CB10
    Exactly.

    An ecosystem goes beyond apps. Look at Hangouts, for instance... computer, tablets, phones and more. Think of the hardware interoperability, accessories etc. Music, video and more.

    The other OSes (MSFT included) are positioning themselves to be end-to-end experiences.
    Ronindan and GadgetTravel like this.
    01-06-16 01:21 PM
  25. early2bed's Avatar
    The fact is that data is stored in files in directories on drives. That's how computers work. Designing a different interface is just makeup.
    Isn't that just the level of abstraction that you currently work in? After all, there is machine code, addresses, and 1's and 0's in there somewhere that you never touch that some chip engineer or 1990's developer says is really how computers work and if you can't manipulate that then you don't really know how to use a computer. How long will it be before drives aren't a consideration? We already are at local storage vs cloud. CD Roms have pretty much disappeared and USB drives are being phased out. One we have universal connectivity then will local storage have to be managed? We're talking about things that happened in less than a decade.

    This is no different than the howls that are heard every time that a hardware company, usually Apple, discards a standard such as serial ports, firewire, VGA, SD card, CD ROM, USB slots, expansion slots. There is a lot of functional fixation about how things must be done - "But I need that ethernet jack on my notebook otherwise I can't ..."

    However, the market has clearly moved away from wanting all of the legacy ports on all devices. iPad-like tablets finally caught on because despite years of Tablet PC development, Microsoft failed to do the necessary streamlining of the hardware and the OS. Getting rid of the file management is an advantage for a mobile ecosystem.
    Elephant_Canyon likes this.
    01-06-16 01:22 PM
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