03-09-17 03:33 PM
60 123
tools
  1. stevec66's Avatar
    My question is with all the billions off messages that are sent every minute of every day, who do they decide to listen into. Not the average person I am sure, any elective official is perhaps a fair target.

    Posted via CB10
    03-08-17 10:10 AM
  2. thurask's Avatar
    My question is with all the billions off messages that are sent every minute of every day, who do they decide to listen into. Not the average person I am sure, any elective official is perhaps a fair target.

    Posted via CB10
    There are ways.
    03-08-17 10:50 AM
  3. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Even messages that are encrypted right now, are being stored... as one day (if not already) there will be equipment capable of cracking those messages like they are some kind of zip file. It kinda like those gold miners in Alaska, they sift through 100's or 1000's of yards of dirt... to find a few ounces of gold.

    Kingdoms have fallen due to one intercepted courier on horseback.... things really haven't changed.

    That said.... I expect any Quantum AI out there would classify most of us as boring.
    03-08-17 11:30 AM
  4. paul360's Avatar
    Is it actually possible to remotely activate the microphone of a BB10 phone to listen in on conversations?

    And if yes - is that done via BB10 weaknesses, similar to iOS weaknesses on iPhones - or via the Android runtime or any installed Android app that has access to the microphone?
    03-08-17 12:54 PM
  5. deadcowboy's Avatar
    Even messages that are encrypted right now, are being stored... as one day (if not already) there will be equipment capable of cracking those messages like they are some kind of zip file. It kinda like those gold miners in Alaska, they sift through 100's or 1000's of yards of dirt... to find a few ounces of gold.

    Kingdoms have fallen due to one intercepted courier on horseback.... things really haven't changed.

    That said.... I expect any Quantum AI out there would classify most of us as boring.
    "I expect any Quantum AI out there would classify the human race as unnecessary and unsustainable--marked for purging."

    Fixt

    Posted via CB10
    Dunt Dunt Dunt likes this.
    03-08-17 02:09 PM
  6. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Where? On the Globe and Mail? On BBC? I see nothing here.
    Both mention tens of zero day android vulnerabilities which supposedly BlackBerry and Google have not fixed...


    Posted via CB10
    Manpower...? Cost? :-)

    •   THISone, with the keys, hopefully coming soon to a phone store down unda... :-D   •
    03-08-17 02:23 PM
  7. Q10Bold's Avatar
    Is it actually possible to remotely activate the microphone of a BB10 phone to listen in on conversations?

    And if yes - is that done via BB10 weaknesses, similar to iOS weaknesses on iPhones - or via the Android runtime or any installed Android app that has access to the microphone?
    I think not..even a call recorder app(native or android) doesnt have access to the mic during a call.

    # soon, later, later this year, fiscal year, commitment,...blablabla ~J.BlaBla Chen
    03-08-17 02:35 PM
  8. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    "I expect any Quantum AI out there would classify the human race as unnecessary and unsustainable--marked for purging."

    Fixt

    Posted via CB10
    Skynet..? :-)

    •   THISone, with the keys, hopefully coming soon to a phone store down unda... :-D   •
    03-08-17 02:57 PM
  9. Mandar Khire's Avatar
    Hi all,
    Nice discussion going on about whole incident.
    I search & read old article
    http://blogs.blackberry.com/2016/09/...erry-software/
    Blackberry claimed that by BlackBerry Enterprise Mobility Suites, BlackBerry Workspaces, BBM Enterprise*(formerly known as BBM Protected), SecuSUITE and SecuTABLET etc solutions for providing highest security requirements from Government agencies.
    But as I read another article
    http://www.financialpost.com/m/wp/fp..._lsa=3d78-6223

    As per article given in above link, 'CIA meeting notes mention QNX as one of several “potential mission areas” for the organization’s Embedded Devices Branch.'
    As BlackBerry is Good in Enterprise security solutions, might they are leader in that field (I hope so)
    After reading 3 different but might interrelated articles,
    1. Did BlackBerry not gave their secure solutions to CIA, as they gave to USA The Department of Defense or others?
    2. What is current status of security solutions given by BlackBerry to those government departments?
    3. As in past BlackBerry security breached, what is currently line of action from Blackberry about CIA's plans?
    4. What Crackberrian think about all this?

    Posted via CB10
    03-08-17 03:28 PM
  10. Nikola Stojic's Avatar
    03-08-17 03:51 PM
  11. AluminiumRims's Avatar
    We already have the example that ADAC did.

    BMW cars found vulnerable in Connected Drive hack | PCWorld

    This particular problem had nothing to do with QNX but the people who designed the BMW software didn't think clearly enough leaving loop holes like that. Also, vulnerabilities doesn't necessarily have to attack QNX or the operating system. There is a large amount of framework code around it and that is much more likely to be attacked.
    03-08-17 05:11 PM
  12. sorinv's Avatar
    Funny, but Wikileaks is not a concern to our sovreignty. Citizen oversight is not a danger.

    I'm referring the the possibility that elected officials could be compromised by embarrassing or illegal material and controlled by intelligence agencies rather than serving the people. Is everyone okay with that?

    Posted via CB10
    Of course wikileaks is just a show window.
    Of course they have everything on all politicians that matter.
    The issue is that the russians do, too, not just the CIA and FBI.
    The more holes you introduce, the greater the chance that your adversaries will use them, too.

    Posted via CB10
    03-08-17 08:01 PM
  13. sorinv's Avatar
    How hard do you think it is for someone who works for a security agency to get hired by BlackBerry, Google, Microsoft, or Apple and intentionally introduce holes in the software?
    Afterall, the software industry prides itself in fixing vulnerabilities and releasing security updates: the more the merrier and the more secure the OS, according to some here.

    Posted via CB10
    03-08-17 08:11 PM
  14. conite's Avatar
    wow, so many people here..."BlackBerry claims 'Most secure mobiles’, really?”,
    Huh?
    03-08-17 08:55 PM
  15. berry1977's Avatar
    Still waiting for 10.3.3
    03-09-17 02:19 AM
  16. deadcowboy's Avatar
    How hard do you think it is for someone who works for a security agency to get hired by BlackBerry, Google, Microsoft, or Apple and intentionally introduce holes in the software?
    Afterall, the software industry prides itself in fixing vulnerabilities and releasing security updates: the more the merrier and the more secure the OS, according to some here.

    Posted via CB10
    I'd imagine Microsoft, Apple, and certainly Google, are complicit in all of this.

    Posted via CB10
    03-09-17 08:59 AM
  17. pkcable's Avatar
    I never really understood these threads, and/or questions. IF you are using your phone to commit crime, certainly the authorities are going to use EVERY tool at their disposal to investigate and ultimately try to bring you to justice! The FBI, CIA, NSA and even local police do indeed have tools and experts they can consult and use to "crack" and/or get evidence from devices used while someone was engaged in suspected criminal activity! They have a right and a responsibility to do this! I was even (in the minority) on the government's side against apple when then wanted access to that terrorist's iPhone!

    DON'T COMMIT CRIME! And you won't have an issue.
    Uzi and anon(3732391) like this.
    03-09-17 09:48 AM
  18. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    I was even (in the minority) on the government's side against apple when then wanted access to that terrorist's iPhone!
    Why? What the DOJ wanted wasn't for Apple to give them the key to a single phone. What they were asking for was a tool to undermine the security of ALL iPhones, EVERYWHERE. Do you really think the US government, in light of recent news, could possibly keep that from getting into the hands of any criminal organization that wanted it?
    TGR1 likes this.
    03-09-17 10:01 AM
  19. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Is it actually possible to remotely activate the microphone of a BB10 phone to listen in on conversations?

    And if yes - is that done via BB10 weaknesses, similar to iOS weaknesses on iPhones - or via the Android runtime or any installed Android app that has access to the microphone?
    This is possible on all cell phones and has been since the conversion to digital (2G). Police use that feature on a fairly regular basis for high-severity issues. It requires carrier involvement, and is a firmware feature, not OS-based.
    03-09-17 10:12 AM
  20. pkcable's Avatar
    Why? What the DOJ wanted wasn't for Apple to give them the key to a single phone. What they were asking for was a tool to undermine the security of ALL iPhones, EVERYWHERE. Do you really think the US government, in light of recent news, could possibly keep that from getting into the hands of any criminal organization that wanted it?
    Well let me phrase it this way, I wanted them (Apple) to crack the terrorist's phone, and or crack ANY criminal's phone for law enforcement who follow legal channels. Warrant, investigation, NATIONAL SECURITY, etc.
    03-09-17 10:18 AM
  21. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    This is possible on all cell phones and has been since the conversion to digital (2G). Police use that feature on a fairly regular basis for high-severity issues. It requires carrier involvement, and is a firmware feature, not OS-based.
    That's why that company Ennetcom that was specialising in secure communications devices was shutdown last year. They took off the shelf BlackBerries and removed both the camera and microphone and then tried to use PGP encryption to communicate via emails.

    So there is a line between offering products to governments and enterprise that are "secured" and meets their needs. And turning around and customizing a secured product that might me the needs of a criminals.
    03-09-17 10:31 AM
  22. paul360's Avatar
    This is possible on all cell phones and has been since the conversion to digital (2G). Police use that feature on a fairly regular basis for high-severity issues. It requires carrier involvement, and is a firmware feature, not OS-based.
    Thanks for the info. But I was thinking more in terms of 'non official' methods - eg. companies are often worried about corporate espionage and so don't allow camera phones, but I guess it would be even easier for rivals to just listen in on a meeting if it were possible to remotely activate a cellphone's mic. And so I guess (or hope) BlackBerry devices would be able to withstand such 'efforts' to a greater extent than iPhones/Androids.
    03-09-17 10:42 AM
  23. nogutsnoglory's Avatar
    I never really understood these threads, and/or questions. IF you are using your phone to commit crime, certainly the authorities are going to use EVERY tool at their disposal to investigate and ultimately try to bring you to justice! The FBI, CIA, NSA and even local police do indeed have tools and experts they can consult and use to "crack" and/or get evidence from devices used while someone was engaged in suspected criminal activity! They have a right and a responsibility to do this! I was even (in the minority) on the government's side against apple when then wanted access to that terrorist's iPhone!

    DON'T COMMIT CRIME! And you won't have an issue.
    I think the concern is not so much about the authorities using tools to spy on criminals or terrorists but rather wether these authorities and tools are being used to spy on average citizens.
    pkcable and TGR1 like this.
    03-09-17 10:50 AM
  24. anon(3732391)'s Avatar
    This should put things to rest:

    The NSA Security Compound UTAH
    In southern Utah there is is a massive complex so large it is more than five times the size of the US Capitol. The heavily fortified $2 billion facility in Bluffdale encompass's 1 million square feet. built by the Bush Administrations U.S. Government and known as
    The Intelligence Community Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative Data Center,

    Its purpose:
    to intercept, decipher, analyze, and store vast swaths of the world’s communications as they zap down from satellites and zip through the underground and undersea cables of international, foreign, and domestic networks.


    03-09-17 11:36 AM
  25. Dmd74's Avatar
    The government has liely been monitoring and hacking us for years. Does anything change now because we have been told of it?
    03-09-17 12:28 PM
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