1. bathu's Avatar
    Really blackphone 2 is more secure? I'm just curious about that. My bro got dtek 50 but I feel it's look like a ordinary android phone. But I wanna know about blackphone 2. Really it's secure when it's compare to dtek50?
    I saw about silent circle (silent phone, silent text messages, we can send timer text message) .if I'm using blackphone 2 the network can know about my calls, text messages they can see all about conversation?

    Posted via CB10
    enrod87 likes this.
    08-18-16 02:33 AM
  2. kvndoom's Avatar
    If you want a phone from a company whose future is even more in doubt than BlackBerry's, go for it!

    Blackberry Poptart SE - Cricket Wireless
    cribble2k and pomidor like this.
    08-18-16 05:09 AM
  3. rt2567's Avatar
    If you want a phone from a company whose future is even more in doubt than BlackBerry's, go for it!

    Blackberry Poptart SE - Cricket Wireless
    Nice reply lol. At least BlackBerry has more experience on corporate customers and governments

    Posted via CB10
    08-18-16 05:50 AM
  4. bathu's Avatar
    So blackberry is secure? but I have doubts about networks because they can see our conversations! Then how we say blackberry is secured? Sorry I don't know that's why I'm asking .

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by bathu; 08-18-16 at 08:58 AM.
    08-18-16 08:46 AM
  5. KNEBB's Avatar
    One issue in this entire conversation of Security is; what the consumer wants more, Total Security or Total Access.
    What I mean is: Total Security means whatever is on your device; the user has awareness and control as to who gets access to that data.
    In today's Ecosystem of apps and devices, it's become more of a "Pay to Play" environment philosophy. By that I mean: data is the price many pay for having Total Access to all the functionality that a device, apps and websites have to offer. And data mining is a portion of that cost. Even BlackBerry has now made compromises in order to become more profitable.
    I don't agree with it, nor believe it's necessary for "the User" to enjoy a device's total functionality. But, it does allow someone a means of profit by marketing your data after the initial sale of the device.
    So the real question is why is it so easily accepted. Because if it wasn't, there was be "less" need for these conversations. But not to say, it's wasn't a good question.

    A BlackBerry Fan
    Last edited by KNEBB; 08-18-16 at 09:10 AM.
    08-18-16 08:53 AM
  6. Karan Riar's Avatar
    So blackberry is secure? but I have doubts about networks because they can see our conversations! Then how we say blackberry is secured? Sorry I don't know that's why I'm asking .

    Posted via CB10
    They see conversations of people that are threat to national security or high profile criminals like blackberry did earlier dismantling drug cartel or a specific criminal organisation against suitable lawful access requests.. I don't get it why people with conversations Inc hey send me some nude pics to their girlfriends and who spend 2hrs regularly on pornhub care about security or track locations.

    Posted via CB10
    08-18-16 10:34 AM
  7. bathu's Avatar
    They see conversations of people that are threat to national security or high profile criminals like blackberry did earlier dismantling drug cartel or a specific criminal organisation against suitable lawful access requests.. I don't get it why people with conversations Inc hey send me some nude pics to their girlfriends and who spend 2hrs regularly on pornhub care about security or track locations.

    Posted via CB10
    Thanks)

    Posted via CB10
    08-18-16 11:53 AM
  8. bakron1's Avatar
    Most folks I know who have corporate devices are using Good and are locked down by the corporate IT department with limited internet and email access and most of them don't even have access to apps unless they pertain to the company. I know most of my clients who have their own IT department who manages their corporate device feel their security is more then adequate for their needs.

    Once you get into the consumer sector, security is the last item on most folks minds, as long their email, Starbucks, Apple or Google pay phone apps work,they could care less. I am basing this off of asking a lot of folks about their views on device security and even if their device is hacked, most would take it to the local carrier store and have then fix the issue. Thats just the way it is in the real world.
    08-18-16 01:16 PM
  9. sorinv's Avatar
    Once you get into the consumer sector, security is the last item on most folks minds, as long their email, Starbucks, Apple or Google pay phone apps work,they could care less. I am basing this off of asking a lot of folks about their views on device security and even if their device is hacked, most would take it to the local carrier store and have then fix the issue. Thats just the way it is in the real world.
    It's not "just the way it is" it is the way that has been imposed on us without being able to choose unless we dump our phones and computers.

    So let's not say that people accept it. People were not given a viable alternative and they had to accept it.

    Soon you'll have to go online for everything and provide your data if you want to buy food or take a taxi.

    There will be just companies like Uber which are valued for the data base of customer info, not for the service they provide.

    But in a few years, they'll know everything about everyone and collecting new data will be useless and valueless, because they already have it...

    So there will be nothing new to monetize...
    08-18-16 03:28 PM
  10. BBUniq01's Avatar
    It's not "just the way it is" it is the way that has been imposed on us without being able to choose unless we dump our phones and computers.

    So let's not say that people accept it. People were not given a viable alternative and they had to accept it.

    Soon you'll have to go online for everything and provide your data if you want to buy food or take a taxi.

    There will be just companies like Uber which are valued for the data base of customer info, not for the service they provide.

    But in a few years, they'll know everything about everyone and collecting new data will be useless and valueless, because they already have it...

    So there will be nothing new to monetize...
    There also seems to be this perception that you are "old fashioned" and not cool if you worry about security therefore declining to use certain apps etc. I love my Priv but the awareness that the Dtek app has given me on the access that apps are using to view my contacts, location etc makes me want to go back to my Classic with minimal apps. Chen was right when he said people will sacrifice convenience for security.

    Posted via my Priv
    08-18-16 04:09 PM
  11. Zeddepher's Avatar
    The Blackphone 1 flopped worse that any BB10 device, despite the claims they were going to displace BlackBerry users and we would all start buying blackphones instead of BB10 phones. The Blackphone 2 won't do any better. BlackBerry has already proven that the security argument doesn't sell phones.

    вℓαквєяяу ραѕѕρσят ѕιℓνєя є∂ιтιση
    cribble2k likes this.
    08-18-16 06:48 PM
  12. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    It's not "just the way it is" it is the way that has been imposed on us without being able to choose unless we dump our phones and computers.
    That's crap.

    iOS, Android, and even WinPhone all offer plenty of security and privacy options that allows users to restrict access to their data and protect them from being hacked. Unless you are someone who is a high-level target (national politician, global CEO, mega-celeb, etc.) or a criminal, it's HIGHLY unlikely that anyone is going to make any significant effort to hack your phone.

    The truth is, though, that most people don't WANT security - at least, not enough to let security inconvenience them by, say, setting a password/PIN on their lock screen, or having to use a different password on every online account. Most people KNOW these are poor security practices, and they DON'T CARE. Nor do they care if Google or Apple or Microsoft or BB tracks where their phone is, or decrypts their text messages.

    The whole reason manufacturers are putting fingerprint scanners and retina scanners in phones is because that's the only way they can get many people to even use a password.

    Plus, you are discounting the VERY REAL AND TANGIBLE BENEFITS that many users get and highly value when they allow companies to use their data. Having Google Now give you a location-based reminder, or a notification that you need to leave 20 minutes early for your meeting due to traffic conditions, has real value, and plenty of fully informed people are happy to share their data with Google in order to get it.

    Some folks here like to think it's all a global conspiracy and that most non-BB users are clueless, but that's crap. Consumers as a whole are a lot smarter than you're giving them credit for, and most people prefer the services, capabilities, and apps that Apple or Google provides over Peek & Flow and the Hub without those apps and services - and even if you were to GIVE every person a BB10 device for 30 days to try and learn, the vast majority would happily switch back after 30 days to get those apps and services.

    I get that some folks here REALLY value BB10's interface and the Hub, and I get it. But your needs are not the needs of the majority, and BB10 is far too expensive to survive as a niche product, so it had to go. That's the whole hard financial reality. BB showed up 6 years late to the modern smartphone party, after everyone had paired up and gone home. That's not anyone's fault but Mike & Jim (and it's mostly Mike).
    08-18-16 07:05 PM
  13. sorinv's Avatar
    That's crap.

    iOS, Android, and even WinPhone all offer plenty of security and privacy options that allows users to restrict access to their data and protect them from being hacked. Unless you are someone who is a high-level target (national politician, global CEO, mega-celeb, etc.) or a criminal, it's HIGHLY unlikely that anyone is going to make any significant effort to hack your phone.

    The truth is, though, that most people don't WANT security - at least, not enough to let security inconvenience them by, say, setting a password/PIN on their lock screen, or having to use a different password on every online account. Most people KNOW these are poor security practices, and they DON'T CARE. Nor do they care if Google or Apple or Microsoft or BB tracks where their phone is, or decrypts their text messages.

    The whole reason manufacturers are putting fingerprint scanners and retina scanners in phones is because that's the only way they can get many people to even use a password.

    Plus, you are discounting the VERY REAL AND TANGIBLE BENEFITS that many users get and highly value when they allow companies to use their data. Having Google Now give you a location-based reminder, or a notification that you need to leave 20 minutes early for your meeting due to traffic conditions, has real value, and plenty of fully informed people are happy to share their data with Google in order to get it.

    Some folks here like to think it's all a global conspiracy and that most non-BB users are clueless, but that's crap. Consumers as a whole are a lot smarter than you're giving them credit for, and most people prefer the services, capabilities, and apps that Apple or Google provides over Peek & Flow and the Hub without those apps and services - and even if you were to GIVE every person a BB10 device for 30 days to try and learn, the vast majority would happily switch back after 30 days to get those apps and services.

    I get that some folks here REALLY value BB10's interface and the Hub, and I get it. But your needs are not the needs of the majority, and BB10 is far too expensive to survive as a niche product, so it had to go. That's the whole hard financial reality. BB showed up 6 years late to the modern smartphone party, after everyone had paired up and gone home. That's not anyone's fault but Mike & Jim (and it's mostly Mike).
    "MOST PEOPLE" is not something you can talk about. There are 7Billion people. Your view is one centric to those in this business, and especially North America.
    If you go to other countries in Japan, in Europe, if you talk to engineers who know how this could have been implemented without invading privacy, the opinion will be quite different.
    People care about privacy but they just accept what people like you tell them: that it is either privacy or lack of convenience.
    That's not true. It's all about data and making money on our data.

    Look at Cisco's most recent decision to go into data analytics because hardware isn't making money anymore.
    But data analytics and data mining will soon dry up, just like the computer and cellphone industries saturated.
    There is only so much information you can collect, beyond which there is only little incremental new information to collect.

    If people really wanted these "free services" and "free apps" they would have paid for them. But they didn't, so Google and the like "invented" another model where they get your data in exchange.

    What does a 5-10 year old, chasing Pokemons, know that he/she is working for "free" to collect location information for others or that they are mass-manipulated through "lures"?
    In other circumstances, industries, and earlier times, this would be called child labour or slavery.
    Last edited by sorinv; 08-20-16 at 07:40 AM.
    08-20-16 07:11 AM
  14. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    "MOST PEOPLE" is not something you can talk about.
    Who are you to tell me what I can talk about?


    There are 7Billion people. Your view is one centric to those in this business, and especially North America.
    If you go to other countries in Japan, in Europe, if you talk to engineers who know how this could have been implemented without invading privacy, the opinion will be quite different.
    Apple and Google hire people from all over the world. So does Microsoft, and, hell, so does BB.

    People care about privacy but they just accept what people like you tell them: that it is either privacy or lack of convenience.
    That's not true. It's all about data and making money on our data.
    Out of 2 billion active smartphone owners all over the world, 1.98 billion of them are using iOS or Android. No one held a gun to anyone's head to make them choose those phones - the fact that you own BB phones proves that. But it also shows that MOST people, given the choice, are happy to entrust their data to Apple or Google in return for valuable services. You're a tiny exception to that rule - a contrarian. And that's fine, but don't pretend you are mainstream, because the numbers easily prove the lie of that.

    Look at Cisco's most recent decision to go into data analytics because hardware isn't making money anymore.
    That's because other companies have sprung up that do a better job for less money. Cisco charged too much for too long and lost a significant part of their market to the competition.

    But data analytics and data mining will soon dry up, just like the computer and cellphone industries saturated.
    There is only so much information you can collect, beyond which there is only little incremental new information to collect.
    Then why are you so concerned about it?

    If people really wanted these "free services" and "free apps" they would have paid for them.
    Sure they did. Many still do. But give the choice of "pay cash OR use it for free in exchange for marketing data", most people choose the latter. Hell, a huge number of apps in Google Play have a free, ad-supported version and an ad-free paid version. Guess which ones are used the most?

    What does a 5-10 year old, chasing Pokemons, know that he/she is working for "free" to collect location information for others or that they are mass-manipulated through "lures"?
    In other circumstances, industries, and earlier times, this would be called child labour or slavery.
    The average Pokemon player is in their 30s.

    I'm sorry, but you have nothing of substance to back up your opinion. You are an exception - an outlier. That's allowed, but it doesn't mean that your views are the majorities views. If they were, BB would be a market leader in smartphones. That they aren't should be proof enough that you're wrong - but there is plenty of other evidence to support that as well.
    bakron1, TGR1 and web99 like this.
    08-20-16 11:54 AM
  15. sorinv's Avatar
    Who are you to tell me what I can talk about?




    Apple and Google hire people from all over the world. So does Microsoft, and, hell, so does BB.



    Out of 2 billion active smartphone owners all over the world, 1.98 billion of them are using iOS or Android. No one held a gun to anyone's head to make them choose those phones - the fact that you own BB phones proves that. But it also shows that MOST people, given the choice, are happy to entrust their data to Apple or Google in return for valuable services. You're a tiny exception to that rule - a contrarian. And that's fine, but don't pretend you are mainstream, because the numbers easily prove the lie of that.



    That's because other companies have sprung up that do a better job for less money. Cisco charged too much for too long and lost a significant part of their market to the competition.



    Then why are you so concerned about it?



    Sure they did. Many still do. But give the choice of "pay cash OR use it for free in exchange for marketing data", most people choose the latter. Hell, a huge number of apps in Google Play have a free, ad-supported version and an ad-free paid version. Guess which ones are used the most?



    The average Pokemon player is in their 30s.

    I'm sorry, but you have nothing of substance to back up your opinion. You are an exception - an outlier. That's allowed, but it doesn't mean that your views are the majorities views. If they were, BB would be a market leader in smartphones. That they aren't should be proof enough that you're wrong - but there is plenty of other evidence to support that as well.
    You are not in a position to claim to speak for the "majority". Maybe for 2billion people out of 7 Billion. The rest of 5billion, the majority, don't have a smartphone.

    I know some of those 2billion who use android or IoS who'd choose privacy if it were offered. In fact a lot of the iphone users now think they have privacy or that at least Apple cares more about privacy than those who provide android phones.
    I know EE engineers using android phones with no apps, precisely for that reason.


    The fact that people accept it unwillingly doesn't meant that they would not pick another solution if it were available.

    Blackberry does not offer the Internet privacy solution either.

    I was talking about computers as well, not just phones.

    The decision has been made for us gradually. And yes, some of us make the effort to minimize the damage but it is becoming increasingly challenging, as I mentioned earlier.
    It's the choice between living in society or becoming a hermit.

    Cisco has decided to focus on data analytics because it makes more money than hardware now. It's the natural evolution of technology. As it becomes old and established, it moves to "lower cost geographies", to use the sterile business lingo.
    It happened with TVs, computers, smartphones and it also happens to Internet hardware now.

    The fact that engineers and workers in low cost geographies are paid less than those in America does not mean that they wouldn't take the higher pay if they could.
    The same goes with the choice for privacy. Beggars can't be chosers.
    Last edited by sorinv; 08-20-16 at 10:54 PM.
    08-20-16 10:38 PM
  16. Old_Mil's Avatar
    The Blackphone 2 is the only droid phone that allows you to modify app permissions and keep your information private.

    Drawbacks include the lack of cases, below average sound quality, feedback on the speakerphone, and average build quality.

    But as far as the OS goes it is the best rendition of droid out there.

    Posted via CB10
    08-21-16 08:07 AM
  17. tre10's Avatar
    The Blackphone 2 is the only droid phone that allows you to modify app permissions and keep your information private.

    Drawbacks include the lack of cases, below average sound quality, feedback on the speakerphone, and average build quality.

    But as far as the OS goes it is the best rendition of droid out there.

    Posted via CB10
    Two screenshots from the priv on marshmallow. I have permissions control.
    anon(9984597) likes this.
    08-21-16 09:11 AM
  18. ohaiguise's Avatar
    'We've got the most secure Android!' (provides no evidence)
    'No, we've got the most secure Android!' (provides no evidence)

    Until they provide evidence they're all full of it.
    08-21-16 09:29 AM
  19. vimagreg's Avatar
    Just my opinion: yes, I do care about my privacy. That's why for me Android is not an option in any scenario. Yes, I use iPhone because oh that. Between a company who at least says it cares about my privacy and another who openly says it uses and sells and make hell with it, I have to choose for the first one. And, yes, recently (very recently) I bought a Passport because in theory at least Blackberry do cares even more about my privacy, and that makes me more comfortably. But, yes, majority of people who owns a smartphone don't care that much about their data, and because of that Android rules the mobile world and Blackberry is almost dead. But, as I care and as I need a lot of apps and services which isn't supported by BBOS 10 anymore (I really feel sorry because I came too late to the party) I will have to come back to iPhone in the first opportunity I have because... yes, maybe I'm an ET, but I really do care about my privacy and my data.

    I really feel a bit strange about that whole situation, which only proves that, hell, this world is a lot weird!! People paying for the right to do the work and to sell your own data to big companies??? Definitely it isn't normal at all...

    Cheers,
    08-21-16 09:47 AM
  20. kvndoom's Avatar
    Equating Pokemon go to child slavery! This sets a new bar, even for Crackberry!

    We've gone beyond jumping the shark... I think we just nuked the fridge...

    Blackberry Poptart SE - Cricket Wireless
    08-21-16 12:45 PM

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