07-29-11 12:07 PM
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  1. rollingrock1988's Avatar
    Did RIM lose its BlackBerry software boss just ahead of QNX transition?

    BGR has learned that Research In Motionís head of BlackBerry software may have left the company. Suresh Periyalwar, Senior Vice President of Handheld Software, had been with RIM since April 2001 when he joined as Director of Software Development. He came to the company from Nortel, where he managed CDMA-related development for more than five years. Periyalwar was promoted to SVP at RIM three years ago in May 2008 according to his LinkedIn profile, which still has him listed as a RIM employee. BGR has also learned from a trusted source that several additional key executives have been planning to leave on their own accord. (more

    RIMís stock is down more than 60% from its 12-month high of $70.54, and there is a great deal of unrest at the companyís headquarters in Waterloo, Ontario. BGR exclusively published an open letter from an anonymous senior executive at RIM late last month, which pleaded for the companyís top management to make several strategic changes in order to regain momentum and mind share in the smartphone market. A later expose, also published by BGR, painted a troubling picture of the smartphone vendor that once revolutionized the industry.

    If Periyalwar did in fact leave the company as multiple sources have informed BGR, it might not bode well for RIMís next-generation smartphones. The departure of RIMís SVP of Handheld Software just ahead of the companyís transition to QNX could imply that the executive did not have confidence in RIMís brand new platform. RIM declined to confirm or deny the executiveís departure when reached for comment by BGR. Periyalwar could not be reached for comment.
    Yeah yeah, it's BGR..... but still...
    07-26-11 11:46 AM
  2. Crucial_Xtreme's Avatar
    This thread isn't going to turn into a bashing of BGR nor is it going to filled with posts of why people believe him. The posts need to be related to the topic at hand, whether or not the guy left or didn't and why.
    07-26-11 11:57 AM
  3. DaedalusIcarusHelios's Avatar
    The guy likely left because he was the old guard and the new guard was coming in (QNX). It might not have even been voluntary. We can speculate various possibilities but BGR only presents one that fits their narrative.
    07-26-11 11:58 AM
  4. rollingrock1988's Avatar
    I think that he didn't see the writing on the wall about the java os being left behind.
    07-26-11 12:03 PM
  5. howarmat's Avatar
    like stated BBOS on the way out and a new Head guy for the QNX platform coming in kinda makes sense. But now doesnt seem the time for his departure yet. so who knows.
    07-26-11 12:05 PM
  6. DaedalusIcarusHelios's Avatar
    I think that he didn't see the writing on the wall about the java os being left behind.
    and that's probably why he's not there anymore. Maybe he went to Google since they seem to be doing well with Java.
    07-26-11 12:05 PM
  7. andyahs's Avatar
    and that's probably why he's not there anymore. Maybe he went to Google since they seem to be doing well with Java.
    Yea Oracle thinks so too!
    07-26-11 12:11 PM
  8. bighap's Avatar
    Doesn't seem like much of a loss to me. This guy become VP in 2008 and what improvements have been made? Any improvements have come due to acquisitions. The new breed of OS7 devices are basically done and QNX is here. Leave the future in the hands of the QNX guys.
    07-26-11 12:13 PM
  9. lnichols's Avatar
    But since the new software is going to be QNX, and QNX is the future, is losing the head of the old BBOS software really a huge loss? I think not. Part of the reason RIM is in trouble is because BBOS is way long in the tooth. I doubt that he was coding anything when he became a SVP anyway. BBOS7 is already laid out, as is likely the sunsetting of. I don't see this as a huge issue.
    07-26-11 12:18 PM
  10. Crucial_Xtreme's Avatar
    and that's probably why he's not there anymore. Maybe he went to Google since they seem to be doing well with Java.
    Really? What "Java" are you speaking of? Android is based on Linux kernel.
    07-26-11 12:19 PM
  11. sleepngbear's Avatar
    Really? What "Java" are you speaking of? Android is based on Linux kernel.
    I think there was just a hint of sarcasm there - with Oracle suing Google for a bundle over Java patent infringements. Good one Helios.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-26-11 12:31 PM
  12. Crucial_Xtreme's Avatar
    I think there was just a hint of sarcasm there - with Oracle suing Google for a bundle over Java patent infringements. Good one Helios.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Indeed. Didn't even cross my mind. Agreed, good one Helios.
    07-26-11 12:34 PM
  13. dentynefire's Avatar
    Oracle sues Google over Android and Java.
    When Google developed Android, it included a Java compatible technology called Dalvik with the phone OS.

    So yes Android is not java based. However Android runs Dalvik, a VM, which is used to execute programs coded in java.
    07-26-11 12:35 PM
  14. Crucial_Xtreme's Avatar
    Oracle sues Google over Android and Java.
    When Google developed Android, it included a Java compatible technology called Dalvik with the phone OS.

    So yes Android is not java based. However Android runs Dalvik, a VM, which is used to execute programs coded in java.
    No I'm sorry you're mistaken a bit. Davlik is NOT a Java Virtual Machine, it's a process virtual machine which has registered based architecture instead of JVM's stack machines. JVM's execute .class or .jar files, Android's execute .dex files. Android doesn't execute java byte code, it takes the Java classes and complies them into said .dex files. Totally different beasts.
    07-26-11 12:44 PM
  15. sleepngbear's Avatar
    There are way too many defections in such a short period of time for it to be coincidence. I think any one or a combination of reasons could be the cause:

    1 - They're being 'asked' to leave due to poor performance
    2 - They are unable to perform to their capabilities due to heavy-handed and narrow-minded senior management (or any number of other flaws with senior management, take your pick)
    3 - They see the writing on the wall and are abandoning ship
    4 - Senior management is simply trying to kick-start the company's performance by replacing old blood with new.

    Same applies to Keith Pardy. Was he asked to leave because he was ineffective? Or was he ineffective because he was not allowed to be, and subsequently left on his own?

    It could all be good news for RIM or it could be bad news - all depends on why they're leaving and what the plans are to fill their roles going forward.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-26-11 12:46 PM
  16. rollingrock1988's Avatar
    No I'm sorry you're mistaken a bit. Davlik is NOT a Java Virtual Machine, it's a process virtual machine which has registered based architecture instead of JVM's stack machines. JVM's execute .class or .jar files, Android's execute .dex files. Android doesn't execute java byte code, it takes the Java classes and complies them into said .dex files. Totally different beasts.
    Unlike Java VMs, which are stack machines, the Dalvik VM is a register-based architecture.

    The relative merits of stack machines versus register-based approaches is a subject of ongoing debate.[4] Generally, stack-based machines must use instructions to load data on the stack and manipulate that data, and, thus, require more instructions than register machines to implement the same high level code, but the instructions in a register machine must encode the source and destination registers and, therefore, tend to be larger. This difference is primarily of importance to VM interpreters for which opcode dispatch tends to be expensive along with other factors similarly relevant to just-in-time compilation.

    A tool called dx is used to convert some (but not all) Java .class files into the .dex format. Multiple classes are included in a single .dex file. Duplicate strings and other constants used in multiple class files are included only once in the .dex output to conserve space. Java bytecode is also converted into an alternate instruction set used by the Dalvik VM. An uncompressed .dex file is typically a few percent smaller in size than a compressed .jar (Java Archive) derived from the same .class files.[5]

    The Dalvik executables may be modified again when installed onto a mobile device. In order to gain further optimizations, byte order may be swapped in certain data, simple data structures and function libraries may be linked inline, and empty class objects may be short-circuited, for example.

    As of Android 2.2, Dalvik has a just-in-time compiler.[6]

    Being optimized for low memory requirements, Dalvik has some specific characteristics that differentiate it from other standard VMs:[7]

    The VM was slimmed down to use less space
    The constant pool has been modified to use only 32-bit indexes to simplify the interpreter
    Standard Java bytecode executes 8-bit stack instructions. Local variables must be copied to or from the operand stack by separate instructions. Dalvik instead uses its own 16-bit instruction set that works directly on local variables. The local variable is commonly picked by a 4-bit 'virtual register' field. This lowers Dalvik's instruction count and raises its interpreter speed.

    Moreover, Dalvik has been designed so that a device can run multiple instances of the VM efficiently.[8]

    alvik is said to be a clean-room implementation rather than a development on top of a standard Java runtime, which would mean it might not inherit copyright-based license restrictions from either the standard-edition or open-source-edition Java runtimes.[12] Dalvik is published under the terms of the Apache License 2.0.[13]
    [edit] Lawsuit

    On 12 August 2010, Oracle, who acquired Sun Microsystems in April 2009 and therefore owns the rights to Java, sued Google over claimed infringement of copyrights and patents. In developing Android, it is alleged that Google knowingly, directly and repeatedly infringed Oracle's Java-related intellectual property.[14][15]

    Specifically the patent infringement claim references seven patents including US Patent No. 5966702 "Method And Apparatus For Preprocessing And Packaging Class Files", and US Patent No. 6910205 "Interpreting Functions Utilizing A Hybrid Of Virtual And Native Machine Instructions".[16] It also references US Patent No. RE38104 "Method And Apparatus For Resolving Data References In Generated Code".

    Yay for wikipedia
    07-26-11 12:48 PM
  17. Crucial_Xtreme's Avatar
    Yay for wikipedia
    This is common knowledge for anyone who codes for either platform and a common misconception.
    07-26-11 12:50 PM
  18. rollingrock1988's Avatar
    This is common knowledge for anyone who codes for either platform and a common misconception.

    I bet. I don't have ANY knowledge of programming first hand.
    07-26-11 12:52 PM
  19. Crucial_Xtreme's Avatar
    I bet. I don't have ANY knowledge of programming first hand.
    Well there's a huge difference in developing applications between the two applications. BlackBerry has JDE(Java Development Environment) which is written in using old SWING program. Android conversely uses Eclipse which is far easier and much more up to date, by about a decade. The difference is huge and makes Dev for BB bad & irritating. But there's more.

    Just like people complain about the poor UI of apps in comparison to other platforms. But the BlackBerry code must be written in Java Code whereas Android uses XML. This is not only better for applications UI development but easier. Also the emulators. If you want to test a new build for BlackBerry, you must fire up emulator each time. That's not the case for Android. And the fact it's open source is easy to get help with problems that may arise.

    Apple on the other hand is easier than the both of them combined. That's why people are happy or like to develop for Apple products. This has changed and will change a bit more when QNX is ported to HH's. QNX has WebWorks, AIR and some others that are simply easier and more up to date. BlackBerry will one day be equal to other platforms on the Dev side and we'll see many more applications that are visually appealing & intricate like applications of other platforms.
    1magine likes this.
    07-26-11 01:23 PM
  20. 1magine's Avatar
    Anyone think some leaks or letters may have been tracked back to their originators.

    It should be noted that rumors in Waterloo abound that allot of top level management heads are rolling. Most senior execs have finally started looking at how various teams interact (and don't) and were shocked at the level of dysfunction they found. Just rumors, but I wouldn't be surprised to see much turn over w/r/t various software groups.
    07-26-11 01:31 PM
  21. 1magine's Avatar
    Well there's a huge difference in developing applications between the two applications. BlackBerry has JDE(Java Development Environment) which is written in using old SWING program. Android conversely uses Eclipse which is far easier and much more up to date, by about a decade. The difference is huge and makes Dev for BB bad & irritating. But there's more.

    Just like people complain about the poor UI of apps in comparison to other platforms. But the BlackBerry code must be written in Java Code whereas Android uses XML. This is not only better for applications UI development but easier. Also the emulators. If you want to test a new build for BlackBerry, you must fire up emulator each time. That's not the case for Android. And the fact it's open source is easy to get help with problems that may arise.

    Apple on the other hand is easier than the both of them combined. That's why people are happy or like to develop for Apple products. This has changed and will change a bit more when QNX is ported to HH's. QNX has WebWorks, AIR and some others that are simply easier and more up to date. BlackBerry will one day be equal to other platforms on the Dev side and we'll see many more applications that are visually appealing & intricate like applications of other platforms.
    I will not hold ny breath for that day. But very much so look forward to it.
    07-26-11 01:33 PM
  22. 01itr's Avatar
    It looks like RIM is trimming the fat, so to speak. I do think with all of this "streamlining" RIM is looking to have a good chance to get back in the game.
    07-26-11 01:35 PM
  23. rollingrock1988's Avatar
    I will not hold ny breath for that day. But very much so look forward to it.
    You won't hold your breath for the day when Blackberry has a ton of apps because they allow all app languages to run on their software?
    07-26-11 01:35 PM
  24. Rooster99's Avatar
    There are way too many defections in such a short period of time for it to be coincidence. I think any one or a combination of reasons could be the cause:

    1 - They're being 'asked' to leave due to poor performance
    2 - They are unable to perform to their capabilities due to heavy-handed and narrow-minded senior management (or any number of other flaws with senior management, take your pick)
    3 - They see the writing on the wall and are abandoning ship
    4 - Senior management is simply trying to kick-start the company's performance by replacing old blood with new.

    Same applies to Keith Pardy. Was he asked to leave because he was ineffective? Or was he ineffective because he was not allowed to be, and subsequently left on his own?

    It could all be good news for RIM or it could be bad news - all depends on why they're leaving and what the plans are to fill their roles going forward.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    To amplify on #2, it's not uncommon for senior people to leave if they don't believe they are going to be able to deliver what they wish to or what they believe is needed. The happens when those above won't listen or won't allocate appropriate resources. I have had personal experience with this twice now in different roles. I left one only to be told "But I need you for another 2 years" when I resigned - too late on their part. Am currently pushing the company owners on sensitive matters in the other role.

    This situation would be very consistent with what we've read of Mike & Jim's attitude in the open letters, and with what we've seen of RIM's product development track record. Unfortunately it would not bode well for future products.

    I'd like to add #5 to fiddy's list as a kind of "no harm, no foul" alternative to #2 : Simply differing visions. Again, not an uncommon cause of departures for senior people. In this case, only time will tell who was right, and we may never be able to tell.

    - R.
    Last edited by Rooster99; 07-26-11 at 02:04 PM.
    07-26-11 02:00 PM
  25. Rooster99's Avatar
    Anyone think some leaks or letters may have been tracked back to their originators. ...
    Good catch - hadn't even thought of this possibility.

    - R.
    07-26-11 02:02 PM
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