1. sogaduch#CB's Avatar
    I know this may be abit odd to think but how long or do you think it would be possible that RIM will ever run out of combinations for PINs? Just was sitting here and that crossed my mind because I know in major cities they have had to create additional area codes because they ran out of numbers just wondering if this can happen with RIM
    11-17-09 02:18 AM
  2. skyboxer's Avatar
    Well I suppose they could always recycle the ones they know to be dead. I believe its an 8 place alphanumeric, or maybe hexidecimal combination. Someone will get in here who's smarter than me and will tell us exactly how many different combinations are available.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-17-09 02:30 AM
  3. gbsn's Avatar
    im not sure, really not sure about this but the possible combinations for an eight character hexadecimal pin outrun the amount of possible smartphone users by a great amount

    i came up with 4,294,967,296 (4 billion)

    correct me if im wrong please
    Last edited by gbsn; 11-17-09 at 05:41 AM.
    11-17-09 05:22 AM
  4. schollianmj's Avatar
    I know my pin is not alpha-numeric... no letters in mine. but every other BB that I had had at least two letters.
    11-17-09 07:15 AM
  5. jbeachy's Avatar
    Calling all real mathematicians…
    I'm thinking the number of possibilities would be a permutation based on 16 candidate values (10 numeric plus 6 alpha) chosen 8 at a time.

    If that is correct, then the possible unique values would be 518,918,400, or about 519 million. (Minus any reserved or "illegal" sequences.)

    Ok, people, take your shots :-)

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-17-09 07:45 AM
  6. Reed McLay's Avatar
    PIN numbers are expressed as groups of hexadecimal numbers. A single hexadecimal digit expresses 4 bits of binary data. Hexadecimal uses the numbers 0-9 and letters a, b, c, d, e, f.

    8 hexadecimal digits express 32 bit of binary data or 4,294,967,295.

    Considering the past decade of BlackBerry production has produced just over 50 million, there are enough PIN numbers for roughly 800 years.

    Then, our distant descendants can safely restart from 0000 0000, no chance of a duplicate PIN number still being in use after 800 odd years.
    11-17-09 09:47 AM
  7. sogaduch#CB's Avatar
    well guess I should freeze myself so I can get the pin of 01101A
    11-17-09 10:31 AM
  8. dcgore's Avatar
    I know this may be abit odd to think but how long or do you think it would be possible that RIM will ever run out of combinations for PINs? Just was sitting here and that crossed my mind because I know in major cities they have had to create additional area codes because they ran out of numbers just wondering if this can happen with RIM
    Once RIM runs out of blackberry pins...they will go to blackberry tags
    11-17-09 10:33 AM
  9. Newpunk's Avatar
    PIN numbers are expressed as groups of hexadecimal numbers. A single hexadecimal digit expresses 4 bits of binary data. Hexadecimal uses the numbers 0-9 and letters a, b, c, d, e, f.

    8 hexadecimal digits express 32 bit of binary data or 4,294,967,295.

    Considering the past decade of BlackBerry production has produced just over 50 million, there are enough PIN numbers for roughly 800 years.

    Then, our distant descendants can safely restart from 0000 0000, no chance of a duplicate PIN number still being in use after 800 odd years.
    This is the same conclusion I came up with. LOL.

    I for one welcome our new RIM overlords...
    11-17-09 12:00 PM
  10. jlb21's Avatar
    PIN numbers are expressed as groups of hexadecimal numbers. A single hexadecimal digit expresses 4 bits of binary data. Hexadecimal uses the numbers 0-9 and letters a, b, c, d, e, f.

    8 hexadecimal digits express 32 bit of binary data or 4,294,967,295.

    Considering the past decade of BlackBerry production has produced just over 50 million, there are enough PIN numbers for roughly 800 years.

    Then, our distant descendants can safely restart from 0000 0000, no chance of a duplicate PIN number still being in use after 800 odd years.
    By then we won't need pins, or blackberries for that matter. We'll all just be hooked into the Matrix.
    11-17-09 12:07 PM
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