03-17-16 06:22 PM
81 1234
tools
  1. z10Jobe's Avatar
    Depends on what platform your talking about.

    BGR is the undisputed king of BlackBerry bashing.

    Not that their beloved iPhone is under fire I wonder how many times have the word BlackBerry came up in a good way.

    TMO  Z10,STL100-3/10.3.2.2789
    I was going to mention BGR but that isn't really a fan site.

    Posted via CB10
    TgeekB likes this.
    02-19-16 09:48 PM
  2. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    Many pundits wrote off Blackberry's PRIV at launch saying " the masses don't care about privacy or security ".
    I think you've gotten that message a bit wrong. What the pundits were saying was, "This phone doesn't live up to its promises of privacy and security."
    donnation and JeepBB like this.
    02-19-16 10:49 PM
  3. donnation's Avatar
    Many pundits wrote off Blackberry's PRIV at launch saying " the masses don't care about privacy or security ". Seems like this is a bigger debate than everyone thought....

    Blackberry has a window here to shine but I'm sure they won't have the marketing prowess to get the message out.

    Posted via CB10
    Interesting. And how does a phone running Google's OS protect your privacy? Hint, it doesn't.
    anon(9710735) and JeepBB like this.
    02-19-16 11:33 PM
  4. anon(9710735)'s Avatar
    Many pundits wrote off Blackberry's PRIV at launch saying " the masses don't care about privacy or security ". Seems like this is a bigger debate than everyone thought....

    Blackberry has a window here to shine but I'm sure they won't have the marketing prowess to get the message out.

    Posted via CB10
    I think it's true though that the majority of the masses don't care about privacy. They want social media. They want selfies, instagram, tinder, snapchat, and all that oversharing and overexposing of their private lives. They don't want privacy. They want convenience. That's why Google is so powerful with all its services being adopted by the masses. Simple to use, easy to connect, but privacy? Nope.

    Posted via CB10
    donnation and JeepBB like this.
    02-20-16 03:23 AM
  5. anon(9710735)'s Avatar
    Interesting. And how does a phone running Google's OS protect your privacy? Hint, it doesn't.
    I agree. If only the Priv was launched with the options to run on either Android or BB10 OS. Otherwise, it doesn't live up to the name Priv and the whole idea of Privacy being protected and guarded, because it essentially running Google's Android means it really isn't that private after all.

    Posted via CB10
    02-20-16 03:26 AM
  6. BBd00d's Avatar
    Question for all of you. If we had a repeat of 9-11 happen, and part of what brings the terrorists to justice was held in the voice and data information found via communication captured by smartphone, should the phone manufacturer (in this case apple or blackberry) give access to said communication?

    Before you answer, ask yourself, what if my family member or friend was in that terrorist attack as a victim, does your opinion change?



    Posted via CB10
    TgeekB likes this.
    02-20-16 06:21 AM
  7. TgeekB's Avatar
    Question for all of you. If we had a repeat of 9-11 happen, and part of what brings the terrorists to justice was held in the voice and data information found via communication captured by smartphone, should the phone manufacturer (in this case apple or blackberry) give access to said communication?

    Before you answer, ask yourself, what if my family member or friend was in that terrorist attack as a victim, does your opinion change?



    Posted via CB10
    Get ready to be attacked. Most people here believe their privacy is more important than the lives of others, though they won't state it that way.
    02-20-16 08:16 AM
  8. donnation's Avatar
    Question for all of you. If we had a repeat of 9-11 happen, and part of what brings the terrorists to justice was held in the voice and data information found via communication captured by smartphone, should the phone manufacturer (in this case apple or blackberry) give access to said communication?

    Before you answer, ask yourself, what if my family member or friend was in that terrorist attack as a victim, does your opinion change?



    Posted via CB10
    The problem is, they aren't asking for one phone to be unlocked. They are asking for a tool that will allow them to unlock it with the "promise" that it would only be used in this one instance.
    02-20-16 09:23 AM
  9. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    Question for all of you. If we had a
    How about we don't deal in tangental, far-fetched hypotheticals?
    02-20-16 09:40 AM
  10. Aman Darred's Avatar
    I don't think this media coverage is good for Apple at all. If they assist the government in cracking the phone (if it is even possible), half of the population will say Apple sold out. If they don't help, half of the population will suggest that Apple is protecting the terrorists.

    It is a lose-lose situation.

    Posted via CB10
    02-20-16 09:58 AM
  11. StoicEngineer's Avatar
    Overlooked in this is that Apple had a "no public discussion" agreement with the DOJ. [Not a legal order but an agreement to keep the investigation details confidential.]

    The DOJ went "public" to put pressure on Apple to help break the encryption.

    So, I hold Apple blameless in this. They knew that the revelation of this dilemma would only hurt them as stated above.

    Posted via CB10
    02-20-16 10:11 AM
  12. luc4625's Avatar
    I agree. If only the Priv was launched with the options to run on either Android or BB10 OS. Otherwise, it doesn't live up to the name Priv and the whole idea of Privacy being protected and guarded, because it essentially running Google's Android means it really isn't that private after all.

    Posted via CB10
    The point being that at launch many underestimated the topic of "privacy". As we've seen this is a larger debate than some os. Do we protect murderers and drug dealers? Blackberry started the conversation on striking the "right" balance but the tech world shrugged it off saying people just want to use instagram etc..
    This is definitely an interesting turn of events.
    02-20-16 10:32 AM
  13. EchoTango's Avatar
    I think what everyone has overlooked was Blackberry has always eluded to iPhone's huge lack of security and here we have the mighty US Government incapable of breaking into that very device. I think Apple is playing this one very smart and is getting tons of free marketing in holding back. Would anyone doubt Apple's security after this ?

    This renders one of Blackberry's main buying criteria completely null and void.
    I've rethought this post as more information is revealed and the current issue seems to be exclusively to FBI accessing the iPhone device. Anyone familiar with the technology knows this is only one device security aspect, the others being data and voice encryption. The access/password software is one of the simplest security technologies, even with the device wipe feature. So, I think acknowledging Apple security superiority is premature

    I still think Blackberry is superior as it embraces all aspects of enterprise security in a unified approach, using the secure device as only one possible access point.

    Curiously, many experts are saying by disassembling the device and installing the components into a "breadboard" or another like device, the data can be accessed easily. It seems to some that the FBI wants to use this situation as a lever on Apple to create a special ongoing access program exclusively for law enforcement use in order to make the process less complicated.
    02-29-16 08:48 PM
  14. byex's Avatar
    Haha, its called marketing. If people actually believe that Apple invented the smartphone then that's the power of good marketing, which BB does not have. BB's marketing is so bad that most people don't even know that they are still making phones.
    Combination of great marketing and an abundance of gullible consumers. Both of which Apple has an endless supply of.

    Posted via CB10
    02-29-16 09:42 PM
  15. byex's Avatar
    NSA would crack that phone in under 10 minutes.

    Posted via CB10
    02-29-16 09:43 PM
  16. donnation's Avatar
    Combination of great marketing and an abundance of gullible consumers. Both of which Apple has an endless supply of.

    Posted via CB10
    Those gullible customers used to be BlackBerry users.
    MikeX74 likes this.
    02-29-16 09:44 PM
  17. StoicEngineer's Avatar
    NSA would crack that phone in under 10 minutes.

    Posted via CB10
    Don't you think that the FBI (DOJ) has access to the NSA?
    03-01-16 07:16 AM
  18. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    Curiously, many experts are saying by disassembling the device and installing the components into a "breadboard" or another like device, the data can be accessed easily.
    Do you have a source for that? All I could find is this:
    How the FBI could use acid and lasers to access data stored on seized iPhone | Ars Technica
    03-01-16 07:30 AM
  19. StoicEngineer's Avatar
    Question for all of you. If we had a repeat of 9-11 happen, and part of what brings the terrorists to justice was held in the voice and data information found via communication captured by smartphone, should the phone manufacturer (in this case apple or blackberry) give access to said communication?
    In Canada, and I believe the UK, there is no LEGAL defence for a manufacturer refusing to work with authorities to gain access to information. However, there may be technical reasons that gaining access is not possible. I'd suppose that every manufacturer, and BlackBerry leads here I think, is looking to make manufacturer access a moot point by making 'hack-proof' devices. This especially includes the elimination of 'back doors' intentionally installed and otherwise.

    My understanding is that in the US the Constitution has many hooks on which manufacturers can support resistance to opening up their equipment to government authorities. This is a historical artefact of the writers of the Constitution, and the succeeding Supreme Court support, having a distrust of government power over the rights of citizens.

    {Personally, I believe that alleged murderers should undergo focused investigation by whatever legal means available. In my opinion, this includes considered judicial suspension of privacy rights. Evidence outside of the bounds of the focused investigation would be sealed or inadmissible for other crimes discovered. The idea being that a murder investigation could devolve into a fishing investigation. As I am not a lawyer, this may be the most stupid legal position ever expressed, lol.}
    03-01-16 08:19 AM
  20. Gervuoge's Avatar
    It's interesting - what phone John McAfee is using. iPhone?

    Posted via CB10
    03-01-16 09:42 AM
  21. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Back to my point. Crackberry is not the land of unified Blackberry love like some of those those other phone fan sites are. The excess of platform bashing on here you speak of is seemingly directed primarily against BlackBerry.
    I think you're simply ignoring the fact that things have gone bad for BB for the last 6-7 years, and that the root cause of that is because of RIM/BB's management. Yes, BB's story is full of bad news, but that isn't bashing, it's simple reporting of events. Yes, there is some occasional outright bashing of BB here (along with plenty of bashing of competing brands), but mostly it's been reporting the facts, usually followed by people correcting a bunch of pie-in-the-sky theories of how one simple change will rocket BB back on top.

    Apple, though they've had a few well-publicized stumbles, has mostly had 8 years of positive news, growth, and profits. Those are the facts, and you can't be mad at those who report those facts, or correct people who dispute them. Me? I'm not a fan of Apple's product line at all, and have never bought an Apple product, but I have no problem accepting the reality of their success.

    The truth is that, as hard as it may be for a few hardcore fans to accept, BB's long fall isn't Apple's fault, and it isn't Google or Samsung's fault - it's Mike Lazaridis's fault. To use a phrase from the Brits, Mike "lost the plot" and started living in his own fantasy land, after creating a corporate culture where he was never to be questioned. By the time it was finally apparent to even himself that BB was hopelessly behind, it was far too late, and that same BB culture was too poisoned and out-of-touch to have any hope of catching up. And this in a business where timing is absolutely critical, BB was 4-5 years behind the curve, missing all of the primary growth years of the industry.

    You can be a fan of the company without being in denial of history and without blaming competitors for your favored company's poor performance. You just have to use your brain and engage your logic instead of running on pure emotion.
    03-01-16 10:12 AM
  22. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    The truth is that, as hard as it may be for a few hardcore fans to accept, BB's long fall isn't Apple's fault, and it isn't Google or Samsung's fault - it's Mike Lazaridis's fault. on.
    I don't know... if Apple and Google hadn't come along and moved the smartphone to another level. Mike's plans would have moved along rather nicely.

    When I first started visiting CrackBerry in 2007.... There were a number of "smart" people discussing why BlackBerry needed a new OS. To this day I can't belive that wasn't something they were already working on in 2007. That they waited till 2010 to buy QNX so they could get started on a new OS... and that it then took them three years to release it and another year to get it out of beta.

    Looking back.... in 2010, Palm for $1.2 Billion would have been a very cheap (compared to BB10 development cost) and smart acquisition for BlackBerry.
    StoicEngineer likes this.
    03-01-16 10:37 AM
  23. StoicEngineer's Avatar
    I don't know... if Apple and Google hadn't come along and moved the smartphone to another level. Mike's plans would have moved along rather nicely.
    Given the rest of your post, I trust everyone will see the quote above as ironic.

    Mike was the co-captain of the BBTitanic who ignored the warning signs... Plans should change to meet the current reality.
    Dunt Dunt Dunt likes this.
    03-01-16 11:45 AM
  24. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Apple and the world already knows BlackBerry's still number one in this department. All they trying to do is show the world that they can do it to. Nothing wrong with that, until it's hacked. This is where being a US company hurts them unlike BlackBerry or Samsung. Apple maybe just have to hand over the keys to the kingdom. Chen may be waiting to see how this plays out before chiming in. But for BlackBerry they have nothing to prove here. Apple and all the rest are the ones.

    I'm waiting to see if the US government take up John McAfee on his offer to hack the phone.

    http://www.cnbc.com/2016/02/19/john-...ck-iphone.html

    I really don't think that the FBI's going to let him. He could purposely erase everything. But you never know. I hope he could do it while showing the world the BlackBerry he uses at the same time. BB FTW!



    TMO  Z10,STL100-3/10.3.2.2789
    You reckon Timmy could initiate a remote wipe and blame it on a glitch..? ;-D

    That would be a hilarious solution of the dilemma, albeit someone might get charged with obstruction of police... or something?

    Laws are different down here....

      There's a Crack in the Berry right now...  
    03-01-16 04:13 PM
  25. StoicEngineer's Avatar
    The truth is revealed. The San Bernardino iPhone is just the start.

    http://wpo.st/S3nH1
    03-02-16 10:07 AM
81 1234

Similar Threads

  1. Group Messaging on Att seems to be fixed
    By crackhd999 in forum BlackBerry Priv
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-11-16, 03:09 PM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-20-16, 10:43 AM
  3. How can I unlock my BlackBerry Q10 ?
    By CrackBerry Question in forum BlackBerry Q10
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-19-16, 06:30 PM
  4. BlackBerry Z30 camera flash randomly turning on
    By espaca in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-19-16, 01:55 PM
  5. Calendar Q10 won't sync with Outlook on new computer, why?
    By CrackBerry Question in forum BlackBerry Q10
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-19-16, 01:40 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD