01-29-13 10:26 AM
28 12
tools
  1. tdaye's Avatar
    I've left my comment for this tool. You should all do the same.

    Does the BlackBerry 10 launch even matter? - Blog Central, Peter Nowak - Macleans.ca
    01-28-13 10:20 AM
  2. tdaye's Avatar
    I've left my comment for this tool. You should all do the same.

    Does the BlackBerry 10 launch even matter? - Blog Central, Peter Nowak - Macleans.ca
    I've seen a lot of great comments on the website, keep them coming guys. Flood this tool's article with positive comments.
    anon(3896606) and Acumenight like this.
    01-28-13 11:05 AM
  3. BaconMunch's Avatar
    Bit the trollbait...oh well it's a Canadian magazine, figured I'd represent.

    BaconMunch • a few seconds ago

    I think more then ever, your article proves why BlackBerry 10 launch comes at such an interesting time.
    1) If Google is so prominent, will Samsung, HTC, LG, Sony, etc sit idly while Google makes ad revenue off their hardware backs?
    2) Smartphone are not quite a commodity yet, people will go without sex or coffee rather then go without their smartphone, smartphone "fanboys" can be found across all demographics and are tending to identity and function rather then replaceable good
    3) BlackBerry 10 is much more than smartphones and tablets, it's a platform and possibly a machine 2 machine platform at that and that's why it matters.
    Acumenight likes this.
    01-28-13 11:08 AM
  4. cgk's Avatar
    It is a lot of things but I don't think it's trollbait - people might disagree with his conclusions but his logic is pretty clear and while it might be wrong, it's not actually unreasonable given the duopoly that exists in the sector. Someone making reasonable points that you disagree with doesn't make that person a "tool".


    Edit: Fixed typo - conclusions not consumers - blasted auto-complete.
    Last edited by cgk; 01-28-13 at 12:46 PM.
    Admorris, Banco and mikeo007 like this.
    01-28-13 11:12 AM
  5. anon(1152406)'s Avatar
    I don't think there is anything "anti-RIM" with his analysis - just his take on the smartphone industry and he does make some very valid points. He wasn't bashing RIM or the new phone.
    01-28-13 11:19 AM
  6. agp101's Avatar
    How about a paste of the article? I mostly like clicking on RIM positive links due to website ratings.
    01-28-13 12:05 PM
  7. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    Does the BlackBerry 10 launch even matter?
    by Peter Nowak on Monday, January 28, 2013 10:35am - 15 Comments
    VIEW IN CLEAN READING MODE WHAT IS THIS ?**
    Does anybody else have the feeling that this week’s launch of BlackBerry 10 doesn’t really matter? It’s not for anything that Research In Motion is or isn’t doing with its long-awaited and overdue handsets, but rather because mobile devices are on their way to becoming commoditized.

    With smartphones, it’s Google that’s driving the trend. As with virtually every area of its business, the company isn’t so interested in selling things to consumers as it is in getting them online and using its services, with the money coming from the ads it serves them that way. That’s why Google is selling the Nexus 4 in North America for $300 without a contract, while in the developing world it’s moving smartphones for just $50. It’s also why Android has more than three quarters of the world’s market share for smartphones. If Google knew the first thing about actually selling stuff to consumers, the constantly sold-out Nexus 4 would be an even bigger deal than it is.

    Neither the Nexus 4 nor those African phones are as high-powered as most of the “hero” devices being sold in advanced markets, but for many users, they’re good enough. With Google plying this very different agenda, smartphone prices have only one way to go: down.

    That’s good for consumers, as it will ultimately change the way phones are sold here in North America. Cheap handsets mean consumers won’t need to sign on for subsidized contracts with carriers. And with no contracts to lock them in, carriers may actually be forced to give consumers better service and prices.

    But it’s bad for phone makers. The healthy profit margins enjoyed so far by the likes of Samsung. and especially Apple. are coming under pressure, which is why there’s been so much chatter lately about the possibility of a cheaper iPhone.

    Apple’s chief executive Tim Cook has tried to deflect such talk by saying he isn’t interested in “revenue for revenue’s sake,” yet the company’s previous actions speak volumes. Apple did launch the cheaper iPad Mini last year in response to pressure from Google and Amazon, who together set the new price agenda on that category with their own smaller and less expensive devices, the Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire, respectively.

    Phones and tablets are inevitably following computers into commoditization. Apple may still charge a premium for its products, but it will ultimately have to settle for a relatively small market share as a result, just as it has in computers. There is also a limit to that premium – with the likes of Google and Amazon setting the pace, the respective days of $700 smartphones and $500 tablets are numbered.

    Which brings us back to BlackBerry. With shrinking margins on the horizon, why would anyone want to be in the smartphone or tablet market? Monolithic conglomerates such as Google, Samsung and Apple can afford it because such devices are but pieces of their much larger wholes. They can take a bath on phones and tablets since they pay off in other ways, including keeping people within their larger ecosystems.

    For smaller, single-purpose players such as RIM or Nokia, which don’t really have anything else to offer consumers, that low-margin future isn’t very appealing.

    It’s no surprise, then, that RIM may be looking to pull an IBM, where it would sell off its hardware business to focus instead on software and services. It’s ironic that the same company involved in IBM’s computer spinoff nearly a decade ago – China’s Lenovo – is the latest potential dance partner to be attached to this idea. And it’s not just speculation; RIM CEO Thorsten Heins says he is considering doing exactly that.

    The smartest thing currently going on at RIM is the development of BlackBerry Fusion, the toolkit that lets businesses manage all the different phones being brought in by employees. This bring-your-own-device niche is one which RIM’s current competitors are unlikely to enter – and it’s potentially a high-margin business, at that.

    Put these trends together with Heins’ oddly-timed comments about a potential hardware sale, and it’s tough to get excited about this week’s BlackBerry 10 launch. It may just be a lot of sound and fury that ultimately won’t matter much, since RIM’s real interests – and future – lay elsewhere.
    Acumenight likes this.
    01-28-13 12:19 PM
  8. Admorris's Avatar
    I really didn't read that as an anti-RIM article at all. Everything he said was backed up with fact and seemed to make a lot of sense.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk 2
    Acumenight likes this.
    01-28-13 12:46 PM
  9. mathking606's Avatar
    Yea he makes a lot of good points and its nto really anti-rim or negative. He just states that Thor is actually smart in looking to get out of the hardware business and focus more on software and services offered by the company and I feel the same way but right now we need to focus on the present which includes having a successful launch on Wednesday.
    01-28-13 12:59 PM
  10. ubizmo's Avatar
    His points about the market don't flow logically from the title question: Does the BB10 launch even matter?

    The BB10 launch matters very much, even if RIM gets out of the hardware business. Nowak seems to miss the obvious point that this launch is as much about software as it is about hardware, if not moreso. He writes as if this is merely a handset launch. That premise is so wrong, it's hard to see the article as much better than sophomoric.
    01-28-13 01:08 PM
  11. borceg's Avatar
    One thing I didn't get - why Canadian websites are mostly anti-RIM ?
    Geeoff likes this.
    01-28-13 01:11 PM
  12. jonty12's Avatar
    Agree. Nothing offensive about his points - there's potentially a lot of validity to them.

    Android arguably became popular (during the 1.0-2.3 days) because carriers were giving phones away with it. For those who wanted a full touch screen, iOS was a much smoother, more stable experience, but was either too expensive or not available for many potential customers (yes I know there were some who really loved Android, but they weren't the majority). By flooding the market with middling phones through what seemed like every carrier and 1000 hardware manufacturers, they gained a foot hold strong enough to now dominate and put out a really good product. They're still giving them away though. Tough to compete with that.
    01-28-13 01:12 PM
  13. houshinto#IM's Avatar
    The title is very misleading, and is definitely bait.

    But that's the game in the info-tainment, as long as you get the hits.
    01-28-13 01:14 PM
  14. sleepngbear's Avatar
    His points about the market don't flow logically from the title question: Does the BB10 launch even matter?

    The BB10 launch matters very much, even if RIM gets out of the hardware business. Nowak seems to miss the obvious point that this launch is as much about software as it is about hardware, if not moreso. He writes as if this is merely a handset launch. That premise is so wrong, it's hard to see the article as much better than sophomoric.
    A LOT of so-called experts are missing this aspect of BB10. It's so much more than a new piece of hardware, it's even more than a new phone OS and UI. They're just not getting it. Peek, Flow, a smart new keyboard and a speedy browser are just the tip of the iceberg as far as what RIM is going to be able to do.
    01-28-13 01:21 PM
  15. darkehawke's Avatar
    A LOT of so-called experts are missing this aspect of BB10. It's so much more than a new piece of hardware, it's even more than a new phone OS and UI. They're just not getting it. Peek, Flow, a smart new keyboard and a speedy browser are just the tip of the iceberg as far as what RIM is going to be able to do.
    i sometimes think BB10 is a tool to keep cash coming in until BES10 takes off which is where i see RIM truly succeeding
    The article has valid points, but could do with a better title
    01-28-13 01:28 PM
  16. kill_9's Avatar
    From a practical point of view the BlackBerry 10 launch event will not matter because it is the availability of the BlackBerry 10 smartphones and how they integrate with the BlackBerry Internet Service and/or BlackBerry Enterprise Service which will determine the success or failure of BlackBerry and Research In Motion. The launch event is primarily for the media and investors.
    01-28-13 01:29 PM
  17. Admorris's Avatar
    A LOT of so-called experts are missing this aspect of BB10. It's so much more than a new piece of hardware, it's even more than a new phone OS and UI. They're just not getting it. Peek, Flow, a smart new keyboard and a speedy browser are just the tip of the iceberg as far as what RIM is going to be able to do.
    While what most of what you say may be true, the fact is that if these handsets don't catch fire, then the part of the iceberg under water will never be seen.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk 2
    01-28-13 01:30 PM
  18. louzer's Avatar
    A LOT of so-called experts are missing this aspect of BB10. It's so much more than a new piece of hardware, it's even more than a new phone OS and UI. They're just not getting it. Peek, Flow, a smart new keyboard and a speedy browser are just the tip of the iceberg as far as what RIM is going to be able to do.
    The bear hits the nail on the head. Wednesday is not about hardware. We've already been shown the hardware from every conceivable angle. The software running on these leaked devices is what's being very carefully controlled. BB10 is not about a device. It's a platform whose roots in QNX provide RIM with an interesting business model with which to move forward.
    01-28-13 01:32 PM
  19. ricocan's Avatar
    Microsoft has never built PC (at least nothing I recall ever seeing) and the aren't building their phones. The have had the dominant OS for PC for years. Where this is all leading for RIM is to become the contenter to this, and to Apples OS, but way more integrated with everything we use in our lives. This launch sets the stage to create a user base of significance, 79 million is good, but I think more are needs, or at least the bleeding needs to be stopped and reversed in developed markets. It seems apparent that trying to compete on hardware is pointless and way to competetive, so it makes sense to leave this arena when they can, they just can't right now. QNX doesn't build anything either, it embeds and connects, I see RIMM being that on a massive scale, they will abandon hardware at some point and become OS connecting everything.
    01-28-13 02:05 PM
  20. 416to604's Avatar
    The launch event is primarily for the media and investors.
    right and they (media & investors) don't matter? i also didn't read this as an anti-RIM article but it surely has a lazy and sensationalist title. if the launch event moves the share price up or down a few dollars how many hundreds of millions of dollars is that? enough for it matter for sure.
    Last edited by 416to604; 01-28-13 at 03:37 PM. Reason: grammar
    01-28-13 03:30 PM
  21. sleepngbear's Avatar
    While what most of what you say may be true, the fact is that if these handsets don't catch fire, then the part of the iceberg under water will never be seen.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk 2
    Agreed. But the fact that some of these pundits are missing is, there's more to what will make the platform succeed than just the nice shiny new handset with no buttons.
    01-28-13 04:21 PM
  22. brmiller1976's Avatar
    Nope, it totally doesn't matter, which is why the columnist wrote an entire article about it. Because it doesn't matter, and columnists write long, nasty columns all about stuff that doesn't matter, all the time.
    01-28-13 04:27 PM
  23. richardat's Avatar
    A LOT of so-called experts are missing this aspect of BB10. It's so much more than a new piece of hardware, it's even more than a new phone OS and UI. They're just not getting it. Peek, Flow, a smart new keyboard and a speedy browser are just the tip of the iceberg as far as what RIM is going to be able to do.
    No. First, you can't blame anyone for judging BB10 for what it is, and what has been shown. Not vague and strange capabilities some are attributing to it. In the end, it IS a phone OS, could it be used in other devices sure? Android and ios are! However, there aren't any breakthrough consumer apps for these OS"s that have been shown yet....or even conceived of, judging by all I've read. I haven't seen anybody even dreaming of a breakthrough paradigm.

    I think a lot of people on this forum don't get that BB10 is contingent upon RIM's phones being a success. The BB10 software, could maybe have a future in some industrial applications, or a licensed OS (though this will be tough sell...as we've already seen....nobody leaping out of their pants to license it), but even if those things were done, they cannot sustain RIM in anything near the form it is now. Licensing will not produce huge numbers of monies....their are certain OS being given away, while others own theirs: nobody will pay high sums for it. Industrial apps could be lucrative, but again, that RIM will not resemble this one...of course, by default, that isn't the consumer market. I am sure RIM is interested in both of those things, but again, the launch really won't matter to either of those, except in a tangential way.

    I think the article writer was looking towards other software and services RIM might potentially try to provide. I do agree with him that it may well be the best way for RIM to go, if options are available.
    01-28-13 06:22 PM
  24. anthonysira's Avatar
    Writer: apple banger
    FSeverino likes this.
    01-28-13 06:33 PM
  25. richardat's Avatar
    Nope, it totally doesn't matter, which is why the columnist wrote an entire article about it. Because it doesn't matter, and columnists write long, nasty columns all about stuff that doesn't matter, all the time.
    There are several reasoning problems in this post, three of which - separate, but interrelated - are:
    1.a writer may write about something which doesn't matter, if in fact, he feels the point he makes from it is of value.
    2. the writer is not saying the launch doesn't matter in any way and thus should not be spoken about, but rather, that the launch will not matter to the future of RIM, and he then writes about why he believes that
    3.a large part of the writers focus is not the launch, but he misperception of the launch

    However, I realize brmiller1976 that you were trying to be intentionally silly! :-) Dangerous around here though. this kind of reasoning is GENUINELY put forward quite often! :-O!
    01-28-13 06:34 PM
28 12

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