04-18-16 12:33 AM
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  1. Dan Foster's Avatar
    Look up dropout jeep. You iPhone has it. How secure do you feel now? I do not need the apps so I can give a select few companies what information I'm working on via dropout jeep. I'll stay in real security,BB10. I kind of think the reason to move everyone into just the two is for all those data centers being build in the U.S.

    Posted via CB10
    02-27-16 11:37 AM
  2. buwee's Avatar
    World leaders may use BlackBerry's.
    They're not even remotely close to the ones the general public uses. They have been heavily modified for security.


    Posted via CB10
    Then why do they not use heavily modified iphones if they are just as secure?
    BB-Xelet likes this.
    02-27-16 11:43 AM
  3. dusanvn's Avatar
    World leaders may use BlackBerry's.
    They're not even remotely close to the ones the general public uses. They have been heavily modified for security.


    Posted via CB10
    World leaders using (modified or not) BB? Probably not any more.

    A phone made recently by General Dynamics for US government (hence probably used by Obama) and a phone recently made by Deutsche Telekom for German government (hence probably used by Merkel) both are modidied versions of Samsung Galaxy Note with enabled Knox.

    Posted via CB10/BB PP SE.
    02-27-16 11:46 AM
  4. anon(9607753)'s Avatar
    The real danger to personal privacy is much more about keeping our personal data out of the hands of the likes of Apple and Google. This is the genius of Apple's strawman argument. Very few appear to be questioning the validity of authorities to have unfettered access to the data of criminals, and yet Apple has made this about an entirely different issue. The elephant in the room...that Apple, Google, Facebook etc. already have 'voluntary' real time access to personal data and activities 24/7 (even though it is supposedly protected behind a password and/or encryption)...remains undiscussed and obfuscated behind a smokescreen of anti-government paranoia.

    And judging by the majority of comments here, that strategy appears to be working.

    Posted via CB10
    BB-Xelet likes this.
    02-27-16 11:53 AM
  5. buwee's Avatar
    World leaders using (modified or not) BB? Probably not any more.

    A phone made recently by General Dynamics for US government (hence probably used by Obama) and a phone recently made by Deutsche Telekom for German government (hence probably used by Merkel) both are modidied versions of Samsung Galaxy Note with enabled Knox.

    Posted via CB10/BB PP SE.
    Probably? - Links if this factual? Or are you just guessing hence you used the word "probably"?
    02-27-16 12:23 PM
  6. PygmySurfer's Avatar
    Look up dropout jeep. You iPhone has it.
    HAS? Or HAD? Were i an iPhone user, Dropout Jeep would be low on my list of concerns, as it requires physical access to the device, and several other piece of software to be installed on the device. It's doubtful all of the pieces required for dropout jeep to be enabled still work on current versions of iOS.
    TgeekB likes this.
    02-27-16 01:01 PM
  7. whatsever's Avatar
    Apple new security is best when you leave sync off with icloud ,itunes and more and still BlackBerry securiy in hardware is better than the iphone and with BES and BBM protected your reach a level that is one that much more advanced.

    With sync of the iphone it's good protected but Android has 10 times lesser seccurity issues than ios in 2015 if you use the right apps, because Android has the most mallware.

    BlackBerry had only 3 security issues which two off theme where with android runtime and BlackBerry apps has non malware issues so far and that makes a final stand for BlackBerry as most secured phone and platform.

    To protect your life data don't use whatsapp or Facebook, these companies storage everything you send and will get your profile from more that 700 items be more correct than ever also with help from your friends that are linked to you. Thanks to them they will be know more about you than you will ever known.

    Be smart and use BBM , delete whatsapp and stop being a product
    BB-Xelet and Superdupont 2_0 like this.
    02-27-16 05:52 PM
  8. PygmySurfer's Avatar
    The real danger to personal privacy is much more about keeping our personal data out of the hands of the likes of Apple and Google. This is the genius of Apple's strawman argument. Very few appear to be questioning the validity of authorities to have unfettered access to the data of criminals, and yet Apple has made this about an entirely different issue. The elephant in the room...that Apple, Google, Facebook etc. already have 'voluntary' real time access to personal data and activities 24/7 (even though it is supposedly protected behind a password and/or encryption)...remains undiscussed and obfuscated behind a smokescreen of anti-government paranoia.
    I don't think Apple really cares about your personal data - their business model is to sell you more widgets. Google mine's your data extensively to deliver targeted advertising. Google cares, but only that they can mine it to deliver better targeted ads. FYI, I believe iCloud data is currently NOT encrypted - I expect that to change in the near future, however.

    I'm not suggesting Apple is 100% trustworthy or that Google is not, merely pointing out the differences in their business models.

    And judging by the majority of comments here, that strategy appears to be working.
    Apple and Google's terms of use and privacy policies are incredibly detailed, and users have the option to not provide any information to these companies, by not utilizing their services. I think most of the users of CrackBerry understand this, and act accordingly.

    Personally, I feel safer granting Google and Apple access to my data than the government.
    Doggerz likes this.
    02-27-16 05:54 PM
  9. z10Jobe's Avatar
    Probably? - Links if this factual? Or are you just guessing hence you used the word "probably"?
    You should have added. That BlackBerry helped Samsung to develop their Knox. He 'probably' didn't know that.

    Posted via CB10
    buwee likes this.
    02-27-16 07:39 PM
  10. sorinv's Avatar


    Apple and Google's terms of use and privacy policies are incredibly detailed, and users have the option to not provide any information to these companies, by not utilizing their services. I think most of the users of CrackBerry understand this, and act accordingly.

    Personally, I feel safer granting Google and Apple access to my data than the government.
    That is not an option. When you have just two platforms that collect all your data and going on the Internet now is absolutely necessary to make a living, you have no option. Your data or the cave!
    02-27-16 08:19 PM
  11. southlander's Avatar
    What do you mean? If his password were 1234 he would be safer than if he has a 16 character password?
    No. The opposite of that. The Apple case shows that there is a way around the encryption if simple short passwords are permitted and used. Even attempt and rate limiting the entries can be overcome apparently if the OS maker can be made to build a custom tool OS to circumvent that.

    In the San Bernardino case if the phones owner used a sufficiently long and complex password then Apple wouldn't even be able to get in from what we know.

    Note that what the FBI is asking is not to attack the encryption but to defeat a separate security measure in order to grant unlimited password attempts.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    TgeekB likes this.
    02-28-16 12:46 AM
  12. southlander's Avatar

    In Canada, the privacy law is the same for everyone, including the prime minister.
    It was his dad who said " the state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation".
    We can extend that now to the smartphones and and computers of the nation. They are just as private as the bedroom, more so because they contain a lot of what we think, who we are, what was only in our brains before.

    Short of torture, there was no way to get into our brains, even with a legal warrant.
    Any person can be as secure or as not secure as they choose regardless of the law. Choosing to use a smartphone makes you a bit less secure than not. Then putting anything sensitive or important on it makes you further less secure. Not using encryption is also a problem. And even so not locking your phone with a complex password is yet another issue. The user can protect themselves. Any sufficiently important political figures have folks around them that know and enforce these rules. And in extreme cases aren't allowed to use tech that creates security issues.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    02-28-16 01:00 AM
  13. blee4's Avatar
    BB is more secure because unlike Apple, it does not store backup copy of your data to the Internet.

    Posted via CB10/BB PP SE.
    Actually Apple gives you both choices, you can CHOOSE not to use iCloud for backups and backup to your local computer via iTunes syncing which also offers password encryption.
    southlander likes this.
    02-28-16 02:42 PM
  14. blee4's Avatar
    Well, most people back up to iCloud. iCloud seems to back up practically everything. So no, you're not secure then. As far as I know, even if you setup the BlackBerry to back up itself to Google, it doesn't send all your private information, it only sends settings etc.

    iCloud collects emails, contacts, calender's, notes, to do lists, document s etc. Your device being encrypted is useless if all your information is being synced remotely where the owner of the remote servers can look at your information anytime.

    I have personally disabled Google backup. The only thing I sync is phone contacts. But really if I was a criminal, I wouldn't store someone's phone number in my phone anyway. That's just stupid. Memorize the number and dont write it down.
    Apple gives you the CHOICE of local backup and local contact, calendar, reminder syncing via iTunes. Local backups and data syncing has been there before iCloud actually since the iPod days.
    BB-Xelet likes this.
    02-28-16 02:46 PM
  15. MikeX74's Avatar
    Actually Apple gives you both choices, you can CHOOSE not to use iCloud for backups and backup to your local computer via iTunes syncing which also offers password encryption.
    Stop, damn you! Too...many...facts!!!
    blee4 likes this.
    02-28-16 02:49 PM
  16. blee4's Avatar
    Any person can be as secure or as not secure as they choose regardless of the law. Choosing to use a smartphone makes you a bit less secure than not. Then putting anything sensitive or important on it makes you further less secure. Not using encryption is also a problem. And even so not locking your phone with a complex password is yet another issue. The user can protect themselves. Any sufficiently important political figures have folks around them that know and enforce these rules. And in extreme cases aren't allowed to use tech that creates security issues.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    Russian guard service reverts to typewriters after NSA leaks

    southlander likes this.
    02-28-16 03:01 PM
  17. byex's Avatar
    Actually Apple gives you both choices, you can CHOOSE not to use iCloud for backups and backup to your local computer via iTunes syncing which also offers password encryption.
    Ya right. Apple giving its users choices. Never.

    Posted via CB10
    anon(9710735) likes this.
    02-28-16 05:45 PM
  18. TgeekB's Avatar
    Ya right. Apple giving its users choices. Never.

    Posted via CB10
    Actually yes, and more than Blackberry.
    02-28-16 06:30 PM
  19. buwee's Avatar
    Actually yes, and more than Blackberry.
    LOL
    byex likes this.
    02-28-16 06:59 PM
  20. byex's Avatar
    Actually yes, and more than Blackberry.
    Okay. Lol
    As a very brief iphone 6 user, choice wasn't at the top of Apples list of offerings to the consumer. If you're talking apps then ya u have never ending choices.

    They do make a great product backed up by a beast of a marketing machine.

    Posted via CB10
    TgeekB likes this.
    02-28-16 08:42 PM
  21. TgeekB's Avatar
    Okay. Lol
    As a very brief iphone 6 user, choice wasn't at the top of Apples list of offerings to the consumer. If you're talking apps then ya u have never ending choices.

    They do make a great product backed up by a beast of a marketing machine.

    Posted via CB10
    I'm currently using the iPhone 6. Not as many choices as Android but doable.
    02-29-16 06:44 AM
  22. Oiche-Shamhna's Avatar
    Here is some of the things that work in The Priv's favor Making it more secure than standard Android BlackBerry’s special sauce includes numerous additional improvements independent of the Android version number, such as:

    Supply chain security for hardware root of trust. That means we “sign” all of our hardware with digital keys at the manufacturing level to ensure device integrity.
    Improvements to the Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) security technique that are not in Android L or M and make it far more difficult for malware – even something like Stagefright – to exploit Android software bugs.
    Improvements to the SELinux mandatory access control policy system not in L or M.
    The Pathtrust utility, which goes above L or M in ensuring that untrusted code cannot be introduced into the system dynamically via malware.
    Hundreds of hardening improvements to the Linux kernel and Android service framework to enable features like DTEK, our new app that helps you protect your own security and privacy.
    Tamper-proofing of critical security parameters.
    Cryptographic improvements, including the use of BlackBerry Certicom certified-FIPS 140-2 security compliant cryptographic library and other techniques that improve upon the Android password’s protection against brute-force attacks.
    Smart card development framework and other enterprise-specific features that benefit business users.
    02-29-16 07:12 AM
  23. Gervuoge's Avatar
    So, please summarize - is iPhone more secure or BlackBerry?
    For example, which more secure - iPhone 5 or BlackBerry Q10?

    SSL, AES, 3rd layer crypts etc., etc. bla, bla, bla... sounds interesting when you are comparing but I am not the IT guy, so it says nothing to me. I just want to lnow which is more secure.

    Posted via CB10
    02-29-16 08:20 AM
  24. conite's Avatar
    So, please summarize - is iPhone more secure or BlackBerry?
    For example, which more secure - iPhone 5 or BlackBerry Q10?

    SSL, AES, 3rd layer crypts etc., etc. bla, bla, bla... sounds interesting when you are comparing but I am not the IT guy, so it says nothing to me. I just want to lnow which is more secure.

    Posted via CB10
    It's never that simple.

    You have to be aware of what your particular vulnerabilities are, or what your particular priorities are, and then analyse the alternatives after.
    02-29-16 08:32 AM
  25. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    So, please summarize - is iPhone more secure or BlackBerry?
    For example, which more secure - iPhone 5 or BlackBerry Q10?

    SSL, AES, 3rd layer crypts etc., etc. bla, bla, bla... sounds interesting when you are comparing but I am not the IT guy, so it says nothing to me. I just want to lnow which is more secure.

    Posted via CB10
    Iphone 5 is Pretty old. But apart from that both are secure enough.

    Posted via CB10
    02-29-16 08:32 AM
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