1. TX Jedi's Avatar
    Even Toilets Arent Safe as Hackers Target Home Devices. Security is key and Blackberry could be at the forefront on this.

    Even Toilets Aren’t Safe as Hackers Target Home Devices - Bloomberg
    06-11-14 11:12 AM
  2. TgeekB's Avatar
    Even Toilets Arent Safe as Hackers Target Home Devices. Security is key and Blackberry could be at the forefront on this.

    Even Toilets Aren’t Safe as Hackers Target Home Devices - Bloomberg
    I don't believe the average person will ever have to worry about their toilet being hacked.

    Posted via my Nexus 10.
    06-11-14 12:42 PM
  3. kbz1960's Avatar
    I don't believe the average person will ever have to worry about their toilet being hacked.

    Posted via my Nexus 10.
    06-11-14 01:38 PM
  4. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    I don't believe the average person will ever have to worry about their toilet being hacked.

    Posted via my Nexus 10.
    Pretty much what KBZ said Imagine the convo with some friends or co-workers, telling them how your toilet was hacked
    Imagine a world, where this is normal and part of casual conversations

    Posted via CB10
    kbz1960 and Supa_Fly1 like this.
    06-11-14 02:12 PM
  5. Playbook007's Avatar
    Well my daughter, with her cracked iphone and mac book in tow comes to me last night and complains about her Hotmail being continually hacked irregardless of password changes. I look at her while on my z30.....shrug my shoulders and say, "no matter what I have told you/tell you, you aren't going to listen........goodnight sweetheart".

    Posted via CB10
    lift and Supa_Fly1 like this.
    06-11-14 02:55 PM
  6. TgeekB's Avatar
    Well my daughter, with her cracked iphone and mac book in tow comes to me last night and complains about her Hotmail being continually hacked irregardless of password changes. I look at her while on my z30.....shrug my shoulders and say, "no matter what I have told you/tell you, you aren't going to listen........goodnight sweetheart".

    Posted via CB10
    I'm sorry to hear about your daughter. Did you assist her to make her less susceptible to having her email hacked? There are other answers besides a BlackBerry.

    Posted via my Nexus 10.
    sentimentGX4 likes this.
    06-11-14 02:59 PM
  7. makingithappen's Avatar
    How 'home hackers' spy on you and your children... with YOUR webcam: The shocking evidence that shows how private lives are snooped on and streamed live on web | Daily Mail Online
    Here's an article I just came across and immediately that interview came into mind with John Chen and the transgender lady, who mentioned, " why would I need to secure my home". Sorry I don't remember the name of the show he was on and the other person that conducted the interview.
    Anyway, IOT is going great be beneficial to BlackBerry they just need to execute before everyone else decides to go after it full force.

    Posted via CB10
    09-20-14 04:41 PM
  8. zocster's Avatar
    http://forums.crackberry.com/general...ry-iot-937991/ keeping in mind there is a discussion on this already, may be I should merge your article there.
    09-20-14 05:14 PM
  9. Phi Nguyen's Avatar
    Well my daughter, with her cracked iphone and mac book in tow comes to me last night and complains about her Hotmail being continually hacked irregardless of password changes. I look at her while on my z30.....shrug my shoulders and say, "no matter what I have told you/tell you, you aren't going to listen........goodnight sweetheart".

    Posted via CB10
    Yes it's time to implement security measures that are simple first

    Contact answers.Microsoft.com and work with the team
    The password isn't the only security measure
    Resetting of previous security options and setting up new ones
    There is two step verification
    Authorized devices
    Using a non simple password
    A password should never be password or 1234567

    A password should always be 8-15 characters long and not just include letters
    It should be a mixture of letters and different caps along with numbers like N0EasyW@y1n
    and should not be used with different services with the same email

    Posted via CrackBerry App
    09-20-14 06:09 PM
  10. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    This is yet another example of "security" only being as good as the way people choose to use it.

    My day job is currently doing high-end audio/video/networking/automation, and as the IT specialist for the company, it's my responsibility to configure routers, security DVRs, and other things that need to be secured. When working on systems that we didn't install (we do service calls and upgrades for systems installed by others), the amount of times I see incredibly lax security is insane.

    People using the default login and passwords for their routers with remote administration turned on. People using the same email and password on every account, with their password being their kid's or pet's name, which they mention daily on Facebook. Etc. For the average person, unless they are forced to improve their security practices, most simply won't. They don't want to remember a bunch of passwords or be otherwise inconvenienced, and because of that, no amount of "security" is going to secure their information. It wouldn't matter if they had a BB phone or an Android or an iPhone or whatever, because their entire digital lives are full of security holes even on the most secure systems - those security holes being directly the result of user laziness and ignorance (sometimes willful ignorance).

    I remember the anger when the bank I was working for started requiring complex passwords, and made them expire every 90 days while also preventing the reuse of the same password with minor variations (no more "Fluffy001" followed by "Fluffy002"). You'd have thought that IT had threatened people's children due to all of the hate. Of course, people eventually adjusted, but there was huge backlash against forced security that the company had to endure before those policies were grudgingly accepted. Few consumer companies, not even BB, forces that kind of thing on users, because most simply don't want it. And without it, security is but the fevered dream of a madman.
    lift and JeepBB like this.
    09-20-14 09:43 PM
  11. desporterizer's Avatar
    What good is a password is you can't remember it or it written down on a post it note? Seriously, somebody needs to come up with a better solution than insane passwords to secure things.

    Posted via CB10
    09-20-14 10:19 PM
  12. MmmHmm's Avatar
    What good is a password is you can't remember it or it written down on a post it note? Seriously, somebody needs to come up with a better solution than insane passwords to secure things.

    Posted via CB10
    Maybe a fingerprint scanner?
    09-21-14 06:28 AM
  13. JeepBB's Avatar
    This is yet another example of "security" only being as good as the way people choose to use it.

    My day job is currently doing high-end audio/video/networking/automation, and as the IT specialist for the company, it's my responsibility to configure routers, security DVRs, and other things that need to be secured. When working on systems that we didn't install (we do service calls and upgrades for systems installed by others), the amount of times I see incredibly lax security is insane.

    People using the default login and passwords for their routers with remote administration turned on. People using the same email and password on every account, with their password being their kid's or pet's name, which they mention daily on Facebook. Etc. For the average person, unless they are forced to improve their security practices, most simply won't. They don't want to remember a bunch of passwords or be otherwise inconvenienced, and because of that, no amount of "security" is going to secure their information. It wouldn't matter if they had a BB phone or an Android or an iPhone or whatever, because their entire digital lives are full of security holes even on the most secure systems - those security holes being directly the result of user laziness and ignorance (sometimes willful ignorance).

    I remember the anger when the bank I was working for started requiring complex passwords, and made them expire every 90 days while also preventing the reuse of the same password with minor variations (no more "Fluffy001" followed by "Fluffy002"). You'd have thought that IT had threatened people's children due to all of the hate. Of course, people eventually adjusted, but there was huge backlash against forced security that the company had to endure before those policies were grudgingly accepted. Few consumer companies, not even BB, forces that kind of thing on users, because most simply don't want it. And without it, security is but the fevered dream of a madman.
    Yes, I completely agree. Security begins and ends with users, and (most?) users really don't want to bother with even the slight inconvenience that security measures often involve. Never mind password security on PCs and websites, I doubt lockscreen PIN usage on phones is anywhere close to 100%.

    I did chuckle in recollection whilst reading your post. Without giving too much away, there was once a secure database system. The system access was protected by frequently changed, computer-generated, lengthy passwords as mandated by our security guys. Nobody had any difficulty accessing the system however as it was common knowledge that all users stuck a post-it note under the keyboard with the difficult to remember password written on it.
    09-21-14 08:06 AM

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