04-08-14 08:38 AM
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  1. Omnitech's Avatar
    Uuugghhhh......people DO IT. They're the same ones who keep their passwords taped to the bottom of their keyboard
    My current favorite: RSA SecurID keyfobs left on the desk underneath the monitor. It's the new stickynote on the monitor.
    03-11-13 02:09 PM
  2. Omnitech's Avatar
    And the thing that makes me see red is that they take the required training EVERY YEAR and they pass the test EVERY YEAR and then they DO THESE THINGS.

    :banghead:
    You should take a look, if you haven't already seen it, at the Guardian UK documentary they did last year on Bradley Manning.

    The security situation where he was stationed was so bad (Can you say: sticky-notes on monitors everywhere?), I'd be surprised if stuff didn't leak out of there..
    03-11-13 02:11 PM
  3. brmiller1976's Avatar
    I love some of the "tricks" to keep one's handset malware-free on Android. Pretty tricky stuff.

    I guess if one is to follow it religiously, Android has fewer apps than any other OS out there, including webOS, since the Editor's Picks are a very small handful of apps across the range.

    As for consumers not caring about security, this is absolutely true. There was a great web site begging people to stop Tweeting photos of their credit and debit cards. And lots of people use "password" or "123456" as their passwords for banking and other essential apps.

    Security doesn't matter until it suddenly does -- like when that cute app you downloaded from Google Play provides a back door into your phone and your employer's servers, or when your phone suddenly gets really hot throughout the day and uses 3 gigs of data daily, or starts dialing 1-900 numbers at $10/minute.

    And don't even get me started on the CarrierIQ rooted malware situation.
    03-11-13 05:16 PM
  4. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    You should take a look, if you haven't already seen it, at the Guardian UK documentary they did last year on Bradley Manning.

    The security situation where he was stationed was so bad (Can you say: sticky-notes on monitors everywhere?), I'd be surprised if stuff didn't leak out of there..
    Just looked it up... LOL.

    Wow.

    In the super-secret government arena, are there repercussions for an employee that inadvertently leads to a breach because of sloppy security protocol?
    03-11-13 05:32 PM
  5. brmiller1976's Avatar
    In the super-secret government arena, are there repercussions for an employee that inadvertently leads to a breach because of sloppy security protocol?
    They have to share an office with this guy:

    U.S. government agency officially reprimands employee for farting too much | News | National Post
    03-11-13 05:35 PM
  6. brmiller1976's Avatar
    03-11-13 05:36 PM
  7. Omnitech's Avatar
    hehehe, dang. Sounds like a stuffy office, though.
    brmiller1976 likes this.
    03-11-13 05:43 PM
  8. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    Just looked it up... LOL.

    Wow.

    In the super-secret government arena, are there repercussions for an employee that inadvertently leads to a breach because of sloppy security protocol?
    Everything from being written up to having a clearance revoked to losing your job to criminal repercussion. It all depends on severity, if it happened more than once, and if any information was compromised.

    Posted via CB10
    03-12-13 05:25 AM
  9. BB Marissa's Avatar
    Everything from being written up to having a clearance revoked to losing your job to criminal repercussion. It all depends on severity, if it happened more than once, and if any information was compromised.

    Posted via CB10
    When I worked with the US DOD, I got told under no uncertain terms what would happen to me if I leaked any of their data, it just so happened that it was me who was called to the guy that told me this when he was caught in a breach.
    I'm still to this day do not know how they could do half the things they threatened me with as I'm a British national. Rendition maybe.
    03-12-13 05:32 AM
  10. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    When I worked with the US DOD, I got told under no uncertain terms what would happen to me if I leaked any of their data, it just so happened that it was me who was called to the guy that told me this when he was caught in a breach.
    I'm still to this day do not know how they could do half the things they threatened me with as I'm a British national. Rendition maybe.
    Citizenship matters only if your country decides to protect you lol

    DOD is a very unique place to work I bet


    Posted via CB10
    03-12-13 05:35 AM
  11. BB Marissa's Avatar
    DOD is a very unique place to work I bet
    Posted via CB10
    It was the oddest contract I've ever worked on. They didn't want to let me go and kept bumping up my security clearance whenever it caused a problem, In the end I wound up leading the project that should only have had US federal employees working on it. I wrote it up to the 'contract going to the cheapest bidder'.
    03-12-13 06:01 AM
  12. xandermac's Avatar

    Or there is this

    Android Malware up 580% Year-Over-Year

    "Here’s a new figure to demonstrate my point: 1.69 percent of all Android apps out there, the majority of which are not on Google Play, are malicious.

    What I’m trying to emphasize here is that most malicious and risky apps aren’t even on the Google Play store to begin with, so most users won’t download and install them.
    "


    Cherry picking to prove a point are we? The "evidence" is so skewed as to be unreliable. You say 100's of thousands of apps are malicious yet you can almost name 2 of them!...
    bobauckland and randall2580 like this.
    03-12-13 08:15 AM
  13. Branta's Avatar
    But whhhhhyyyyy, I mean, you trust Starbucks to make your coffee, why wouldnt you trust their network connection?
    Well, the network is probably less toxic than their over-burned, over-priced, under-strength coffee
    03-12-13 09:37 AM
  14. Branta's Avatar
    My current favorite: RSA SecurID keyfobs left on the desk underneath the monitor. It's the new stickynote on the monitor.
    One lap in the microwave usually makes sure the unguarded device will not allow data to leak in the future.
    bobauckland likes this.
    03-12-13 09:41 AM
  15. sam_b77's Avatar
    Got another security issue for iOS. Doesn't seem to be Apple's fault but still folks should be aware:
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-57...-to-ios-users/

    Posted via CB10
    03-12-13 09:55 AM
  16. xandermac's Avatar
    Got another security issue for iOS. Doesn't seem to be Apple's fault but still folks should be aware:
    Researchers highlight potential security risk to iOS users | Apple - CNET News

    Posted via CB10
    Yep, that's a concern. It requires a password to install mobileconfig files as far as I'm aware (does on my device anyway), hopefully that would make most people think twice.
    03-12-13 10:15 AM
  17. qbnkelt's Avatar
    Well, the network is probably less toxic than their over-burned, over-priced, under-strength coffee
    Ok Branta....I'm familiar with English coffee.......which is the reason I drink tea when I'm there....



    Sent from my SEXY HOT RED SGIII using Tapatalk 2
    03-12-13 11:41 AM
  18. Bold_until_Hybrid_Comes's Avatar
    Android is more vulnerable than blackberry.
    03-12-13 11:46 AM
  19. katiepea's Avatar
    the most popular OS always has the most virus/malware, the least always the least. this is true for desktops also. security exists best through obscurity, popularity makes you a target. there is nothing that can't be broken into.
    pillswoj likes this.
    03-12-13 11:51 AM
  20. Bold_until_Hybrid_Comes's Avatar
    the most popular OS always has the most virus/malware, the least always the least. this is true for desktops also. security exists best through obscurity, popularity makes you a target. there is nothing that can't be broken into.
    Please advise amount of virus's on BlackBerry when the were the most popular.
    03-12-13 12:11 PM
  21. Omnitech's Avatar
    ...it just so happened that it was me who was called to the guy that told me this when he was caught in a breach.
    I'm having trouble figuring out what that sentence means.

    "Called to the guy"?



    the most popular OS always has the most virus/malware, the least always the least.
    Not necessarily.


    also. security exists best through obscurity
    "Security via obscurity" is a universal joke in the security field.
    03-12-13 01:25 PM
  22. TgeekB's Avatar
    Please advise amount of virus's on BlackBerry when the were the most popular.
    I think malware and viruses on mobile devices is rather new (in large numbers).
    03-12-13 01:35 PM
  23. BB Marissa's Avatar
    Ok Branta....I'm familiar with English coffee.......which is the reason I drink tea when I'm there....
    I would have a Neros, or Costa Coffee over a Tim Hortons any day of the week. Both have far more depth of flavour.
    03-12-13 01:39 PM
  24. Branta's Avatar
    the most popular OS always has the most virus/malware, the least always the least. this is true for desktops also. security exists best through obscurity, popularity makes you a target. there is nothing that can't be broken into.
    I would challenge "security exists best through obscurity" as an absolute global concept, although a few secrets always help. Maybe at the most abstract layer it is true... for example, encryption like PGP is pretty damned secure, but the only secret is the PK. Taking a more common example, every thief knows how a lock works but that is only a partial solution to picking it. Knowing the dimensions of the wards makes it easy to replicate a key without knowing the method of operation, but if the method of operation is secret it will take a lot longer to pick the lock. Is that an example of defense in depth?
    03-12-13 05:57 PM
  25. Branta's Avatar
    "Security via obscurity" is a universal joke in the security field.
    It isn't a joke. The more obstacles you put in the way of an opponent the harder he must work, and the more likely he will fail. Did you ever wonder why secrecy (obscurity) existed in military and diplomatic circles since civilization began?
    03-12-13 06:02 PM
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