05-20-11 04:12 PM
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  1. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    I agree with you. I just think that RIM has two figures: an expectation (x), and a goal (x + y). So, while RIM's expectation may be right in line with what you're saying, I think we'd also agree that their goal is to be a large scale player in the market.
    Oh I am sure they have grandiose goals and realistic earnings goals, heck I do that myself, my company sets a 13% growth goal, I set a 15% growth goal, but in my mind I am targeting 25% and every plan and project I undertake is with the major goal in mind, but accepting the more realistic goal.

    IF I was RIM my goal for Playbook sales would be based on a percentage of Handset sales per quarter, for example RIM sells 14,000,000 globally, lets say 50% of that is North American, so RIM sells 7,000,000 handsets to North America, with a decline of 10% per quarter ( probably a conservative decline in the US) and with the Playbook they want to achieve 5-7% penetration so that would be 350,000-500,000 per quarter in North America,
    05-19-11 02:54 PM
  2. infamyx's Avatar
    They are making a lot of the same progressions (and mistakes)... It's strikingly similar to WM.

    The only major, obvious difference is that WM performance was pretty much always terrible. I think the manufacturers are going to cannibalize each other... There are too many handsets, too often, too fragmented, and too similar... Not to mention the battle of the "skins" is kind of dumb because a lot of them really suck.
    You seem to be grossly mistaken. Like the PC market, they are fighting each other to build the best at equal prices. Its already happened, they are stuffing the baddest tech you can find in these phones, just like PCs. When a manufacturer fails to put out a reliable quality product at a competitive price, they will ultimately destroy themselves.

    Fragmentation is about as hilariously overblown as Flash on iOS. Numerous APIs cut out the developer work like different screen resolutions, different processors (if a developer chooses to take advantage of specific hardware in certain phones are up to them). There are baseline requirements for some apps to even run, hardware or software wise. That means that some POS prepaid phone packing 2 year old hardware wont run the latest and greatest, consumers already understand this for the most part.

    Ice Cream Sandwich is taking it a step further and unifying everything in Android across numerous devices. Write once, run on anything be it phone or tablet. Cutting even more work that the developer has to do

    As for too many headsets, is that even a bad thing? If they all ran like **** yeah maybe. Too often? Regular consumers are not technophiles, they arent running to grab the latest dual core phone if they just bought a phone 6 months to a year ago.
    05-19-11 04:02 PM
  3. mbrouill's Avatar
    It's only the start
    05-20-11 04:01 PM
  4. papped's Avatar
    You seem to be grossly mistaken. Like the PC market, they are fighting each other to build the best at equal prices. Its already happened, they are stuffing the baddest tech you can find in these phones, just like PCs. When a manufacturer fails to put out a reliable quality product at a competitive price, they will ultimately destroy themselves.
    They are cutting their own margins and shortening the lifespans of sales on the device.

    Continually stuffing newer hardware in devices every few months and maintaining the same (or lower) prices sounds great for consumers, and I expect them to like that.

    That doesn't mean they aren't eating each other. THE EXACT SAME PROGRESSION HAPPENED WITH WM.

    Regardless I don't care if you agree or if you think fragmentation is overblown, so it's moot. And that's great that the next, unreleased OS will supposedly fix all of the fragmentation issues. It might matter after it actually starts to happen and isn't more than just a promise currently.

    I'll dumb it down once again.... Even if you are consumer (non technophile), you will care about longevity of support. More devices = less chance of long term support, unless you care to argue that Samsung has the best device support in the business because they release so many devices...
    Last edited by papped; 05-20-11 at 04:16 PM.
    05-20-11 04:12 PM
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