1. Jake2826's Avatar
    Have many CIO's been sleeping by adopting a Bring Your Own Device to work policy and should CarrierIQ be a wakeup call for them that maybe issuing your employees with corprate secure BlackBerries wasn't so bad an idea after all? Thoughts?


    Carrier IQ is BYOD kiss of death -- urgent action required - Computerworld Blogs
    Last edited by Jake2826; 12-03-11 at 06:03 AM.
    12-03-11 05:59 AM
  2. steve911's Avatar
    I manage almost 50 mobile phones. After hearing this I will in no way let our data on an Android phone.

    Though I never allowed BYOD before and I will continue with this policy.
    12-03-11 01:33 PM
  3. bricenm's Avatar
    Would all this Carrier IQ scrutiny actually be a blessing in disguise for RIM? I would think this would get more CIO's interested in BB Mobile Fusion for those employees insisting on BYOD even if they have to wait until early next year for it to be released.
    12-03-11 03:50 PM
  4. Jake2826's Avatar
    I believe the Wiki-Leaks and CarrierIQ revelations are going to wake up allot of people, the Enterprise especially. It's not enough to trust that your government's legislators will be able to protect you. For the Enterprise, there is simply too much at risk. Frankly, I've been somewhat dumbfounded at how many CIO's seem to not be paying attention to how serious the 'inner' security threat really is. They actually think that all one needs on their company's mobile devices is remote wiping capability, while almost completely ignoring the the threats like trojans, rootkits, phishing programs, phone and message monitoring, etc... that comes from within the device itself. BlackBerry may not be fun for your employees who want to be able to play Angry Birds, but at least the extensive IT Administrator controls of BES give the CIO the tools he/she needs to take control of a situation that could have huge consequences if not taken seriously.

    Wikileaks - The Spy files
    Last edited by Jake2826; 12-03-11 at 07:06 PM.
    12-03-11 07:03 PM
  5. fire6's Avatar
    How do we know if carrierIQ isn't on the BB phones that are supplied to our IT department? We get our phones from AT&T If carrierIQ is being placed on at the factory deep down in side they could be on the BES phones our employer hands us. Could a BES policy be written that would stop the actions of carrierIQ? Just thoughts.
    12-03-11 07:18 PM
  6. ThePoisonBerry's Avatar
    CarrierIQ could be a good thing for RIM!
    12-03-11 09:01 PM
  7. jelp2's Avatar
    How do we know if carrierIQ isn't on the BB phones that are supplied to our IT department? We get our phones from AT&T If carrierIQ is being placed on at the factory deep down in side they could be on the BES phones our employer hands us. Could a BES policy be written that would stop the actions of carrierIQ? Just thoughts.
    I'm not in IT or developer, but just from reading many threads on this it seems that at least on BB that it would show up in the applications list. It wouldn't be buried anywhere. Also permissions would have to be granted for it to run. I would think, especially in an enterprise environment, all applications on the phones would be locked/deleted except for the ones deemed necessary by the IT dept.
    12-03-11 09:53 PM
  8. karaya1's Avatar
    The way BB OS works and because of its security i believe its impossible for a carrier to "hide" the app on the phone. It would be in the app menu. RIM also said it doesnt allow carriers to install it on their devices.

    No clue why more people are not outraged by this.
    12-04-11 07:48 AM
  9. SRR500's Avatar
    I read in another thread (can't remember which one) that on a BB the CIQ program has to be hidden inside another app in order to be undetected and to receive the permissions it needs. The OP of that thread reported that Sprint had it inside of an app called "My Account" which was preinstalled.
    12-04-11 08:33 AM
  10. Danf's Avatar
    If Sprint is putting this on BB's then it is probably hidden inside of the App "Sprint zone" that has "my account" in it.
    12-04-11 09:06 AM
  11. SRR500's Avatar
    If Sprint is putting this on BB's then it is probably hidden inside of the App "Sprint zone" that has "my account" in it.
    That sounds familiar. I bet you're right. Thanks for the correction.
    12-04-11 09:13 AM
  12. grahamf's Avatar
    CarrierIQ could be a good thing for RIM!
    Agreed.

    The only way to get CIQ on a BB is to install one of the applications your carrier pushed to your handset (carriers can only push a download/install link, not the application itself).

    Have a BES policy denying applications that your carrier pushed, and you're gold.

    I don't know how BlackBerry Balance works with CIQ; maybe it'll prevent CIQ from accessing data from the work side of the device also.

    Needless to say, none of these security measures can be done on Android devices or iPhones.
    Jake2826 likes this.
    12-04-11 02:22 PM
  13. lnichols's Avatar
    The way BB OS works and because of its security i believe its impossible for a carrier to "hide" the app on the phone. It would be in the app menu. RIM also said it doesnt allow carriers to install it on their devices.

    No clue why more people are not outraged by this.
    T-mobile says that they have Carrier IQ installed on some the following phones:

    HTC Amaze 4G
    Samsung Galaxy S II
    Samsung Exhibit II 4G
    T-Mobile myTouch by LG
    T-Mobile myTouch Q by LG
    LG DoublePlay
    Blackberry 9900
    Blackberry 9360
    Blackberry 9810


    So RIM may not allow it, but T-Mobile doesn't care. I'm really upset by this. Even if they don't do anything with the app, the fact that they are essentially installing spyware on my phones is garbage.
    12-04-11 03:10 PM
  14. avt123's Avatar
    Sure this is good for RIM...until CIQ is forcefully removed, or their is a way to opt out from Android devices. Once those options happen, it is back to where they started before people found out about CIQ.

    BBMF will definitely gain popularity fromt his though.
    12-04-11 03:23 PM
  15. Exiled Bulldawg's Avatar
    This isn't going to change the landscape for BYOD. First, RIM isn't immune to the rootkit, as T-Mobile was loading it on Blackberries. Second, from this thread it seems Sprint was also.

    Considering this was a carrier invasion of privacy, this will not stop. It could also be there is another rootkit out there we don't know about. Any carrier could load this type of logger on any RIM device and it will beat RIMs security. Why? Because it sees everything BEFORE encryption takes place. It could get around BES because it is hidden in the OS by the carrier.
    12-04-11 11:38 PM
  16. Jake2826's Avatar
    It could get around BES because it is hidden in the OS by the carrier.
    No. not hidden in the OS. The carrier hides it in a 3rd party app. But these 3rd party apps and modules are easily deleted on a BlackBerry thank God, unlike some other mobile operating systems. If you're concerned, just disable the permissions on applications from your carrier or delete the damn things.
    Last edited by Jake2826; 12-05-11 at 12:06 AM.
    12-04-11 11:49 PM
  17. Exiled Bulldawg's Avatar
    You can't delete some of the carrier apps. I would love to delete VZ Navigator on principle. I can't. It's there. Like a damn barnacle.

    They could easily put it in the background and make it something you could neither see nor get rid of. No one on T-mobile ever found the CarrierIQ. And RIM isn't the paragon of virtue, they had to be aware of this intrusive app too.
    12-05-11 12:07 AM
  18. Jake2826's Avatar
    No one on T-mobile ever found the CarrierIQ.
    Actually they did. Check out the news story on the home page of CrackBerry. Turns out that carrierIQ is in the T-Mobile 'My Acount' app.
    Last edited by Jake2826; 12-05-11 at 12:14 AM.
    12-05-11 12:10 AM
  19. Exiled Bulldawg's Avatar
    Actually they did. Check out the news story on the home page of CrackBerry. Turns out that carrierIQ is in the T-Mobile 'My Acount' app.
    That's not what I was saying. I am pointing out no Blackberry user ever noticed before this story broke and they knew to look. It was an Android user that found and documented the program. The story on Crackberry is a continuation of his find.

    Further, T-Mobile was the one loading the application onto the phone. All carriers have access to the phone before the customer. All carriers have the ability to put applications on phones that cannot be taken off. Even against RIM's supposedly secure platform. If the device has a rootkit hidden in it by the provider, that is damned hard to fix. There is no guarantee the next rootkit couldn't be tied to the SMS program.

    In short, if your carrier is going to screw you, RIM isn't going to stop them. They will probably help.
    12-05-11 12:40 AM
  20. grahamf's Avatar
    You can't delete some of the carrier apps. I would love to delete VZ Navigator on principle. I can't. It's there. Like a damn barnacle..
    You sure that's the application? I'm pretty sure if you launch it, it will open the browser and bring you to a page where you can download and install VZ Navigator. these short cuts cannot be deleted (or return after a reboot), but the take up little space so you can hide them and forget about them.
    12-05-11 01:13 AM
  21. qbnkelt's Avatar
    Agreed.

    The only way to get CIQ on a BB is to install one of the applications your carrier pushed to your handset (carriers can only push a download/install link, not the application itself).

    Have a BES policy denying applications that your carrier pushed, and you're gold.

    I don't know how BlackBerry Balance works with CIQ; maybe it'll prevent CIQ from accessing data from the work side of the device also.

    Needless to say, none of these security measures can be done on Android devices or iPhones.
    THIS is one of the reasons BES is so valued, this type of control.

    I can't even load anything as harmless as the Weather Channel.
    12-05-11 04:35 AM
  22. SRR500's Avatar
    ... There is no guarantee the next rootkit couldn't be tied to the SMS program...
    I'm not sure this would be possible. Carriers wouldn't have access to the source code for the SMS app (or anything else that RIM writes). I think it would HAVE to be hidden inside a 3rd party app.

    As far as I know RIM doesn't give their source code out to anybody. It's as secret and well guarded as Cornel Sanders secret recipie.

    I could be wrong, please correct me if I am.
    12-05-11 06:47 AM
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