1. jkusuda's Avatar
    Since I don't hack and my programming skills are limited, I'll preface this by saying I'm assuming rooting only exposes the rooted device to security issues. Other then this, I don't understand why it is perceived to be bad enough to make it the first priority when building a new OS version like RIM has done with the Playbook OS.

    From my point of view, the rooting community gives an insight into what people want and things the device can do that haven't been built for the device through the official OS. It is a source of invaluable feedback and R&D if the company just monitors and taps into it.

    My original thought had been that the rooting would give a malicious user an easier route to finding exploits and holes. However, after thinking it over further, someone malicious is going to find a way through the device security anyways.
    01-01-12 01:46 PM
  2. lnichols's Avatar
    If there is a simple root of a device, then hypothetically someone could obtain physical access to a device, root it, and gain access to sensitive data (e-mails, contacts, etc) possibly before the device owner has a chance to remote wipe. To the aberage user they my just shrug and say "So what!", but some this is a concern.
    01-01-12 02:00 PM
  3. jkusuda's Avatar
    If they gave a simple root method, I can see how this would be a downfall. However, if they gave the user the choice and built it in, the advantages are pretty significant.

    I think one way for them to do it limiting liability is to give the user the choice upon activation of a new OS on the Blackberry device (whether it be phone or tablet) to open the root ability or not. They could also make it required to enter in a root password. If the user opts to root, make sure it is acknowledged that they are outside EULA and RIM takes no responsibility of the consequences of lost or stolen data.

    Apple's success is a sign that few people want to go to the extremes of rooting and playing around with the OS and software like this. Most of the people that do know that they are doing things that the phone was not intended to do and that there could be consequences. If the whole rooting community were encouraged, they have the ability to advance platforms and show uses that many users could benefit from without the expenditure of company resources and with no liability to problems created by it.

    I think that many of the tech companies do a poor job of using resources like this because many of us consumers would give advice, feedback, and most of all testing of beta product for free.
    01-01-12 05:26 PM
  4. lnichols's Avatar
    If they gave a simple root method, I can see how this would be a downfall. However, if they gave the user the choice and built it in, the advantages are pretty significant.

    I think one way for them to do it limiting liability is to give the user the choice upon activation of a new OS on the Blackberry device (whether it be phone or tablet) to open the root ability or not. They could also make it required to enter in a root password. If the user opts to root, make sure it is acknowledged that they are outside EULA and RIM takes no responsibility of the consequences of lost or stolen data.

    Apple's success is a sign that few people want to go to the extremes of rooting and playing around with the OS and software like this. Most of the people that do know that they are doing things that the phone was not intended to do and that there could be consequences. If the whole rooting community were encouraged, they have the ability to advance platforms and show uses that many users could benefit from without the expenditure of company resources and with no liability to problems created by it.

    I think that many of the tech companies do a poor job of using resources like this because many of us consumers would give advice, feedback, and most of all testing of beta product for free.
    Apple doesn't want people to jailbreak the devices (Google doesn't care). The ability of the device to be easily rooted is preventing the certification of iOS for use in the government, and requiring neutered or hardened versions of Android to be implemented. Also I would venture that the ability to Jailbreak or root an iOs or Android device isn't a major factor in the sales of the devices, and this is only being done by a small minority of the user base of each OS. So if it isn't a major factor in sales, but is preventing some big sales in sectore like government, is it a major benefit to anyone but the hackers and geeks who have nothing else better to do with their time than play with phones?
    01-01-12 05:48 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD