02-09-12 06:43 AM
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  1. xanadome's Avatar
    If that is the case, RIM needs to succeed, or else it will go the way of Nortel.
    Right.
    But in their heyday of each company, RIM was no Nortel.
    Yet, Nortel was auctioned piece by piece, patent by patent, and there was nothing the fed could do about it.
    Market principle will dictate.
    02-08-12 01:12 AM
  2. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Microsoft has not tried. They intentionally left out business oriented features to focus on the consumer market. Your post makes no sense because you make too many ignorant assumptions.


    Sent from my HD7 using Board Express
    The "business features" will be available in Windows 8. Windows Phone 8: Next Step to a Seamless Windows Experience? | CIO Blogs
    02-08-12 01:17 AM
  3. ubizmo's Avatar
    The main reason why Microsoft might "need" to buy RIM would be to take them off the game board, hoping to gain a large share of their user base, especially in business. Windows Phone Mango is already pretty good, and Windows 8 "Apollo" promises to be better.

    If Microsoft were to do this, they might begin by phasing out BBs in the developed world markets where they most hope to secure a foothold for WP, leaving BBs to make money in emerging markets.

    Whether it would actually make fiscal sense to do something this extravagant is way over my head. But they did buy Danger/SideKick a few years ago, apparently to let it die out.
    02-08-12 08:59 AM
  4. kbz1960's Avatar
    Well now it seems ms is going to be paying sales people to sell wp.
    02-08-12 09:07 AM
  5. Thunderbuck's Avatar
    I have both a playbook and iPad, but my macbook air is my go to device and is maybe only half inch longer than my iPad. if i could only have one, it would be the air. Why? hmmm, lets see. more storage, more versatility, more ports, more programs, more compatibility with different files, more os options, bigger screen, better text input, touchpad, easier to organize and access files, better a productivity apps, its faster, games are larger with better sounds and graphics, web pages load faster and format properly..... need i go on? Plus, i believe the 11" air has been the best selling mac ever since the refresh. So I don't think its going away soon, what your seeing is its influence spreading to the larger MacBooks.
    For MOST of the things you do MOST of the time, a tablet will work better. Storage? Keep stuff in the Cloud. Bigger screen? For browsing, why? More powerful? For browsing, my PlayBook is right up there with my (very good) laptop. And my tablet is the kind of REAL instant-on that Microsoft has been promising since Windows 2000. I don't even have to open it.

    For most people, the small laptop in particular is going to lose relevance. If I'm doing something that really DOES need that much power, I'd rather go to either a desktop or a laptop with a big enough display and enough power to make a real difference.
    02-08-12 09:24 AM
  6. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    For most people, the small laptop in particular is going to lose relevance. If I'm doing something that really DOES need that much power, I'd rather go to either a desktop or a laptop with a big enough display and enough power to make a real difference.
    Ultrabooks will become the predominant form factor in laptops. The price is already dropping. Ultrabook Prices Dropping Before 2nd-Gen Ivy Bridge Launch
    02-08-12 10:42 AM
  7. fernandez21's Avatar
    For MOST of the things you do MOST of the time, a tablet will work better. Storage? Keep stuff in the Cloud. Bigger screen? For browsing, why? More powerful? For browsing, my PlayBook is right up there with my (very good) laptop. And my tablet is the kind of REAL instant-on that Microsoft has been promising since Windows 2000. I don't even have to open it.

    For most people, the small laptop in particular is going to lose relevance. If I'm doing something that really DOES need that much power, I'd rather go to either a desktop or a laptop with a big enough display and enough power to make a real difference.
    Ok, most of the things I do most of the time woud be browse the web, watch videos (hulu, netflix, itunes, vudu) and listen to music (itunes). So tell me, how would doing tHose things on a tablet be better than on my macbook aiir?

    For websurfing, the mac is faster, I don't have to worry about stuff like java or flash compatibitlity, if I want to comment on something its much easier to type, I don't have to do as much scrolling, can download and access anything I want, and its easier to switch back and forth between different tabs.

    For videos, on the laptop the screen is bigger and speakers are better, don't have to worry if the streaming srevice I want to use has an app, no buffering, and I don't have to worry about a stand or to have to hold the screen up.

    As for music, its all there I don't have to worry if I synced a track or not, can use the keyboard to switch tracks without stopping what I'm doing, don't have to worry about drm, more EQ options, and more player and visual options.

    Tablets are nice, as I said I have two and will get a third soon, but to me there is no contest about which device I prefer. The tablet is more of a book/paper/magazine replacement that can also surf the web and have video and music.
    02-08-12 11:53 AM
  8. HabsSuck's Avatar
    AVIVA Insurance Group has over 46,000 employees worldwide, they recently announced in the UK that they are adopting the PlayBook for its 120 mobile risk advisor team who work remotely visiting insured locations. This is good new albeit small, but it takes time to get acceptance for a new product, how long did it take for the iPhone to get accepted in enterprise?
    02-08-12 12:54 PM
  9. jonty12's Avatar
    Ok, most of the things I do most of the time woud be browse the web, watch videos (hulu, netflix, itunes, vudu) and listen to music (itunes). So tell me, how would doing tHose things on a tablet be better than on my macbook aiir?

    For websurfing, the mac is faster, I don't have to worry about stuff like java or flash compatibitlity, if I want to comment on something its much easier to type, I don't have to do as much scrolling, can download and access anything I want, and its easier to switch back and forth between different tabs.

    For videos, on the laptop the screen is bigger and speakers are better, don't have to worry if the streaming srevice I want to use has an app, no buffering, and I don't have to worry about a stand or to have to hold the screen up.

    As for music, its all there I don't have to worry if I synced a track or not, can use the keyboard to switch tracks without stopping what I'm doing, don't have to worry about drm, more EQ options, and more player and visual options.

    Tablets are nice, as I said I have two and will get a third soon, but to me there is no contest about which device I prefer. The tablet is more of a book/paper/magazine replacement that can also surf the web and have video and music.
    Overall I agree that I do need my laptop at times, but, Fernandez you really should try a PlayBook.

    Specifically, with my PlayBook:
    • I don't have to worry about Flash and Java comaptibility
    • It's easy to comment/type, especially with the new BlackBerry remote feature
    • My speakers are much better than on my ThinkPad laptop
    • I have a case that works as a stand, so viewing angle is no issue
    • I can download pretty much anything (inlcuding several hundred MB files)
    • Switching between tabs is pretty much the same as a desktop
    • Screen real estate isn't really an issue with a standard micro-HDMI port


    Perhaps the above are issues with "other" tablets (although the stand is a given with most others).

    I still need the laptop for advanced spreadsheet stuff, building several hundred page bookmarked/linked pdfs, some very specific peoplesoft web apps, and a few proprietary things, but for the most part, my laptop can sit in my case a lot of the time.

    So, bottom line, there is still a laptop need, but tablets will move them to niche markets.
    02-08-12 01:46 PM
  10. jonty12's Avatar
    For MOST of the things you do MOST of the time, a tablet will work better. Storage? Keep stuff in the Cloud. Bigger screen? For browsing, why? More powerful? For browsing, my PlayBook is right up there with my (very good) laptop. And my tablet is the kind of REAL instant-on that Microsoft has been promising since Windows 2000. I don't even have to open it.

    For most people, the small laptop in particular is going to lose relevance. If I'm doing something that really DOES need that much power, I'd rather go to either a desktop or a laptop with a big enough display and enough power to make a real difference.
    and when the "cloud" isn't accessible??? happens more often than many think. In mission critical business settings it can be crippling. Happens to me while traveling on business or between client sites at least two-three times a week. Luckily I have room for the data on my laptop. Bigger screen for browsing is great to have - efficient reading, seeing detail, etc.

    I agree with the instant on though. Most frustrating part of my laptop is start-up time. Macs are pretty close to instant on now though.
    02-08-12 01:50 PM
  11. fernandez21's Avatar
    Overall I agree that I do need my laptop at times, but, Fernandez you really should try a PlayBook.

    Specifically, with my PlayBook:
    • I don't have to worry about Flash and Java comaptibility
    • It's easy to comment/type, especially with the new BlackBerry remote feature
    • My speakers are much better than on my ThinkPad laptop
    • I have a case that works as a stand, so viewing angle is no issue
    • I can download pretty much anything (inlcuding several hundred MB files)
    • Switching between tabs is pretty much the same as a desktop
    • Screen real estate isn't really an issue with a standard micro-HDMI port


    Perhaps the above are issues with "other" tablets (although the stand is a given with most others).

    I still need the laptop for advanced spreadsheet stuff, building several hundred page bookmarked/linked pdfs, some very specific peoplesoft web apps, and a few proprietary things, but for the most part, my laptop can sit in my case a lot of the time.

    So, bottom line, there is still a laptop need, but tablets will move them to niche markets.
    I do have a playbook, that I can occasionally use if I can pry it away from wife, along with an iPad 2 and a laptop is still better in all the things you mentioned. Not to say you CAN'T do those things, nor am I saying its a bad experience, but what I am saying is that a computer is still BETTER for those tasks. Yes its easy to type on the playbook (it's virtual keyboard is probably the best along with the windows phone keyboard) and using the blackberry keyboard is even better, but neither are still as good as typing on a full size computer keyboard. Yes, flash and java both preform well on the playbook, but you're still limited on what you can do (can't access netflix or hulu for example). On the PC there are no limits at all on what you can do.

    And maybe laptops will move to a niche market, maybe they always were but were the only devices that could do what we wanted so people put up with them, but I don't see how they will go away anytime soon.
    Last edited by fernandez21; 02-08-12 at 03:30 PM.
    02-08-12 02:38 PM
  12. 91300zx's Avatar
    MS buying RIM would be great. More job security for me lol.
    02-08-12 03:43 PM
  13. AlienSlacker's Avatar
    I personally would love to see RIM make it on their own. However, I just dont see them having the money to create the ecosystem needed for the future. Im writing this because of the Halliburton news and other news about the exodus to iOS.

    I can see the allure of iOS, and it has nothing to do with how cool it is, or some fad/trend. It is the fact that iOS devices are made to work together. You have the phone, tablet and computer, all linked together (hopefully in a seamless way), and this spells efficiency, and efficiency spells more production at a lower per unit cost (even if the initial investment is high).

    It also bothers me that Heins is waiting for the first security breach. For one, this may not happen. Second, Apple has a couple years (that is how long it will take for a company to make the complete transition) and a hundred billion dollars to create a state of the art security system for there iOS devices. And I think companies believe they will be able to do it.

    So why does Microsoft NEED to buy RIM. The answer is to retain their corporate strong hold. The media focuses on how RIM is losing to Apple, but every time a corporation moves to iOS, they are also moving away from Windows. RIM has the smartphone, tablets, and QNX (for cars etc), Microsoft has the OS, software, and cash. If Microsoft waits too long, they will start seeing Windows erode faster than the perceived blackberry erosion.

    My worry for RIM is that android will take over the consumer market from RIM and Apple will take over the corporate market from RIM. Companies overseas will follow suit, and well have two heavyweights in the future (Apple and Google).
    Rim is not going bankrupt anytime soon nor is it a failing company ripe for take over. I know some people on these forums get some sort of perverse pleasure in proclaiming that Rim is near death but SORRY not happening.
    02-09-12 12:10 AM
  14. VanCity778's Avatar
    Microsoft buy RIM ?

    First off. eww !!

    Second off. Obvious troll post.
    02-09-12 12:12 AM
  15. E92Vancouver's Avatar
    I personally would love to see RIM make it on their own. However, I just don’t see them having the money to create the ecosystem needed for the future. I’m writing this because of the Halliburton news and other news about the exodus to iOS.

    I can see the allure of iOS, and it has nothing to do with how cool it is, or some fad/trend. It is the fact that iOS devices are made to work together. You have the phone, tablet and computer, all linked together (hopefully in a seamless way), and this spells efficiency, and efficiency spells more production at a lower per unit cost (even if the initial investment is high).

    It also bothers me that Heins is waiting for the first security breach. For one, this may not happen. Second, Apple has a couple years (that is how long it will take for a company to make the complete transition) and a hundred billion dollars to create a state of the art security system for there iOS devices. And I think companies believe they will be able to do it.

    So why does Microsoft NEED to buy RIM. The answer is to retain their corporate strong hold. The media focuses on how RIM is losing to Apple, but every time a corporation moves to iOS, they are also moving away from Windows. RIM has the smartphone, tablets, and QNX (for cars etc), Microsoft has the OS, software, and cash. If Microsoft waits too long, they will start seeing Windows erode faster than the perceived blackberry erosion.

    My worry for RIM is that android will take over the consumer market from RIM and Apple will take over the corporate market from RIM. Companies overseas will follow suit, and we’ll have two heavyweights in the future (Apple and Google).
    Apple and Google license Microsoft Exchange Active Sync to give Android and iOS mobile users (i.e. the consumer market) FREE push email, and wireless syncing of their calendar and contacts.

    Microsoft is making money off of android and iOS users who use these devices to access corporate email off of an Exchange Server.

    Microsoft is doing just fine without having to buy RIM.

    RIM was a middle man selling BES services to hook up their mobile devices to an Exchange Server. I remember the BES plans being punitively expensive, costing $100 for 7 mb of data per month when a consumer BIS plan was $50 for 25 mb of data.

    RIM exploited the corporation with price gouging. BIS email on Blackberries was initially POP with polling every 15 minutes or push if you integrated your consumer email with your blackberry.net email.

    Consumers on BIS had to sync contacts and calendars on their Blackberry to their PC with a cable while BES users got the wireless sync. BIS email never did sync with your webmail.

    Then came a long Microsoft with their Exchange Active Sync licensed to Apple and Google that gave push email, wireless syncing of contacts and calendar and full email syncronization with your PC webmail (i.e. Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail).

    This killed RIM's desirability from the consumer's point of view.

    Blackberry is holding on to their loyal customer's addiction to BBM but now KiK Messenger and Whatsapp is nipping at RIM's heels.

    RIM has been kicked in the groin and is rolling on the ground and now Apple and Google are taking the boots to RIM with Microsoft's help.

    If the delivery of QNX is a disaster and the stock price falls to like $5 then MSFT would probably buy RIM.

    Then c
    Last edited by E92Vancouver; 02-09-12 at 01:14 AM.
    02-09-12 01:10 AM
  16. Rootbrian's Avatar
    Answer is No.

    Research in Motion is fine the way they are.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com using Tapatalk
    02-09-12 03:23 AM
  17. blackberry-unlocking710's Avatar
    I don't think that having only 2 companies to sell us products will do any good for the pricing of those devices..
    Blackberry should make a good launch with BB10 and keep up with the market.
    02-09-12 06:43 AM
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