View Poll Results: Applications....

Voters
23. You may not vote on this poll
  • I BlackBerry for apps

    13 56.52%
  • I have a secondary device just for apps

    1 4.35%
  • The app world made me re-think having a BlackBerry

    6 26.09%
  • I don't use app's their not what I look for in a smartphone

    5 21.74%
Multiple Choice Poll.
  1. siddo_d's Avatar
    It honestly make me sad how many people/developers hate the blackberry platform enough to boycott it and not develop for it at all. Even though there are so many opportunities and advantages of developing for us.

    Okay yeah... I understand there are a-lot of device environments to cater for but in the end people do download them and statistics show we pay for them as well. RIM, if things get really bad might need to consider finding a way to completely moving to the android app market/Google play and when doing so android developers will not need to reformat or code their app's any different; They just work!

    I hope it doesn't get that bad but tbh app's are the fundamental key to an smartphone at the moment and RIM need to find another way of getting app developers.

    I love my blackberry don't get me wrong and the app's aren't exactly disgustingly terrible that you can't use them but compared to other platforms you then understand why app's are a key element and why people love their iPhone's/Android's.
    mark-d and cucvovan like this.
    03-10-12 03:20 PM
  2. Chrisy's Avatar
    I won't leave BlackBerry again for lack of apps. But I'd sure LOVE some more app choices, better quality and cheaper apps!

    That option isn't on the poll.
    siddo_d likes this.
    03-10-12 03:36 PM
  3. SC457's Avatar
    Pretty much feel BlackBerry comes with the important apps. Banking, markets, and social media apps are really the only ones I've downloaded
    03-10-12 03:52 PM
  4. karaya1's Avatar
    The app situation has been improving steadily since I adopted BB in 2007.
    The biggest issue I find is that old BB users don't think BB has ANY apps. That's on RIMs marketing, again. People are shocked that my 9700 can shazam, whatsapp, check markets and has intergrated social feeds. They though they needed an android or iphone for those basic capibilities and are more interested in BB again once I explain this simple fact. BB has a lot of great apps that make it a damn good "smart phone".
    03-10-12 03:58 PM
  5. miata's Avatar
    The phones are pretty good for apps, but I was frankly very surprised at how many apps are on the Playbook after one year -- and am not just talking about quantity. There are not very many good apps -- period. Fortunately, I use my Playbook as an extension of the phone for PIM, email and web surfing, and in that regard the Playbook is the best.
    Khouri86 likes this.
    03-10-12 06:28 PM
  6. siddo_d's Avatar
    The app situation has been improving steadily since I adopted BB in 2007.
    The biggest issue I find is that old BB users don't think BB has ANY apps. That's on RIMs marketing, again. People are shocked that my 9700 can shazam, whatsapp, check markets and has intergrated social feeds. They though they needed an android or iphone for those basic capibilities and are more interested in BB again once I explain this simple fact. BB has a lot of great apps that make it a damn good "smart phone".
    This is very true and it annoys me alot that people think blackberry has no apps what so ever and no one can truly say BlackBerry isn't a smartphone because it has all the elements but application quality and quantity is what makes a modern smart phone in their opinion
    Last edited by siddo_d; 03-10-12 at 06:35 PM.
    03-10-12 06:32 PM
  7. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    I think your poll would be better off with options questioning Development Environments/Tools, number of users, etc...
    siddo_d and LoganSix like this.
    03-10-12 06:35 PM
  8. siddo_d's Avatar
    Loool true. Didn't really come to mind before
    03-10-12 06:38 PM
  9. app_Developer's Avatar
    Hate isn't even close to the right word. Learning all the ins and outs and tricks of designing and writing and debugging a quality app takes time. The moment RIM announced BBX and announced that it wouldnt run older apps, there wasn't any motivation to dive in and learn the old java Apis, which really are so primitive compared to what we have on Android and especially iOS.

    Then, of course, our clients also lost interest in older BB's and are waiting to see what happens with BB10.

    I'll wrote for BB10 and PB when we get Cascades.
    Last edited by app_Developer; 03-10-12 at 06:48 PM.
    03-10-12 06:43 PM
  10. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Well, running my first dev process for an app right now.
    I'm not used to other platforms but my goal is to build a cross-platform one.
    My choice, so far (because of my current knowledge, mostly web related) is going to Air.
    (big)If I can succeed, then ... who couldn't ?

    It's a matter of time ... the main point being able to use the same framework for all (all is, by nature, abusive) platforms & displays ...
    03-10-12 06:49 PM
  11. s7khan's Avatar
    Answer from a app developer friend:-

    His background is that he is a former RIM coop student, wants the company to succeed, but has certain barriers to entry when it comes to developing apps for BlackBerry.

    1) BBOS (Not the new OS based on QNX) is much harder to code with. It's an old operating system. He created a Ted Talks related app for the BlackBerry and the iPhone. iPhone development took 4 days, the BlackBerry took 2 weeks

    2) Weaker hardware. While Android phones and iPhones got more powerful, BlackBerry remained underpowered. In addition to coding difficulties, once you do have an app on the BlackBerry, if it's complicated app, it will run slow, even crash the phone. I have a 9800 that can barely run Waze GPS app. On the iPhone 4, it runs extremely efficient.

    3) Lost interest. A year or two ago, there were a bunch of articles about how RIM made the initial process so terribly complicated to develop apps, it turned away a lot of people. Now they are paying for that mistake

    4) Not enough users. QNX on the Playbook is much more easier to code for. However, the problem with developing apps on the Playbook is that you reach a really tiny market. A million isn't that many when you consider that there are 10s of millions of iPads out there. If your app takes a day to code, then make it for both platforms. If it's a long process, then you might just choose the more lucrative platform.

    5) People don't see a future for RIM. Another developer I know started a project to develop an app for the Android and the iPhone. They talked about the BlackBerry and decided not to bother since they believe the platform to be dieing or at least losing clout with the mass market.

    These are just some reasons why people "hate blackberry app development"
    cucvovan likes this.
    03-10-12 07:46 PM
  12. anthogag's Avatar
    Answer from a app developer friend:-

    His background is that he is a former RIM coop student, wants the company to succeed, but has certain barriers to entry when it comes to developing apps for BlackBerry.

    1) BBOS (Not the new OS based on QNX) is much harder to code with. It's an old operating system. He created a Ted Talks related app for the BlackBerry and the iPhone. iPhone development took 4 days, the BlackBerry took 2 weeks

    2) Weaker hardware. While Android phones and iPhones got more powerful, BlackBerry remained underpowered. In addition to coding difficulties, once you do have an app on the BlackBerry, if it's complicated app, it will run slow, even crash the phone. I have a 9800 that can barely run Waze GPS app. On the iPhone 4, it runs extremely efficient.

    3) Lost interest. A year or two ago, there were a bunch of articles about how RIM made the initial process so terribly complicated to develop apps, it turned away a lot of people. Now they are paying for that mistake

    4) Not enough users. QNX on the Playbook is much more easier to code for. However, the problem with developing apps on the Playbook is that you reach a really tiny market. A million isn't that many when you consider that there are 10s of millions of iPads out there. If your app takes a day to code, then make it for both platforms. If it's a long process, then you might just choose the more lucrative platform.

    5) People don't see a future for RIM. Another developer I know started a project to develop an app for the Android and the iPhone. They talked about the BlackBerry and decided not to bother since they believe the platform to be dieing or at least losing clout with the mass market.

    These are just some reasons why people "hate blackberry app development"


    The playbook market is smaller but that means your app will be noticed and if its good a lot of users will buy it
    03-10-12 08:16 PM
  13. s7khan's Avatar
    The playbook market is smaller but that means your app will be noticed and if its good a lot of users will buy it
    As a business owner, there are a lot of things I could do to make a bit of money, but there is a certain lower limit I'm willing to provide my services for. Below that point, it's not worth my time. I can imagine that same rational applies to all app developers with a business.

    As for free apps, the ones that are ad based won't make enough money even if an entire 10% download the specific app, it may not even break even.

    Even Instagram took a few years to get onto Android. They worked on an app to perfect the experience, and almost everyone I've talked to who've used it loves it. They could've expanded their base quickly by going over other OS's, but they worked on quality first.
    03-13-12 10:17 AM
  14. LoganSix's Avatar
    Answer from a app developer friend:-

    His background is that he is a former RIM coop student, wants the company to succeed, but has certain barriers to entry when it comes to developing apps for BlackBerry.

    1) BBOS (Not the new OS based on QNX) is much harder to code with. It's an old operating system. He created a Ted Talks related app for the BlackBerry and the iPhone. iPhone development took 4 days, the BlackBerry took 2 weeks
    I guess it depends on what you are coding for. J2ME is annoying, but I can't imagine it is much different than the Java version on Android. WebWorks / HTML 5 doesn't seem to be that difficult and any Phone with OS 5 and up can run it. Granted, I am having an issue with the key signing, which I believe is the usual complaint for coding for BlackBerry.

    2) Weaker hardware. While Android phones and iPhones got more powerful, BlackBerry remained underpowered. In addition to coding difficulties, once you do have an app on the BlackBerry, if it's complicated app, it will run slow, even crash the phone. I have a 9800 that can barely run Waze GPS app. On the iPhone 4, it runs extremely efficient.
    No argument there. The current phones are limited. Again, HTML 5 helps with some of those limitations. I'm trying to look into that know for my corporate app.

    3) Lost interest. A year or two ago, there were a bunch of articles about how RIM made the initial process so terribly complicated to develop apps, it turned away a lot of people. Now they are paying for that mistake
    BB10 and QNX should change some of those minds. They do seem to be putting forth a much better effort with regards to developers. Even updating the Developer site to be more user friendly. Not to mention trying to win developers with free hardware. I bet they will give away free BB10 phones just like they did with the PlayBook

    4) Not enough users. QNX on the Playbook is much more easier to code for. However, the problem with developing apps on the Playbook is that you reach a really tiny market.
    Except for that if you do get a good app, then you have a better chance of reaching the entire market, unlike Android and iOS. And, for some reason, you can charge more and make more money.

    5) People don't see a future for RIM. Another developer I know started a project to develop an app for the Android and the iPhone. They talked about the BlackBerry and decided not to bother since they believe the platform to be dieing or at least losing clout with the mass market.

    These are just some reasons why people "hate blackberry app development"
    I think if a developer is afraid to develop for RIM because they might be going away, then they should just develop in HTML 5. Then they can offer the app on multiple platforms and do minor coding to target a specific device.
    s7khan likes this.
    03-13-12 10:31 AM
  15. s7khan's Avatar
    I gave this response to the developer that gave me the initial answer. His responses are in red

    I guess it depends on what you are coding for. J2ME is annoying, but I can't imagine it is much different than the Java version on Android. WebWorks / HTML 5 doesn't seem to be that difficult and any Phone with OS 5 and up can run it. Granted, I am having an issue with the key signing, which I believe is the usual complaint for coding for BlackBerry.

    He gave me an answer about this, and I forgot it. I'm terrible with programming and none of it made sense to me.


    BB10 and QNX should change some of those minds. They do seem to be putting forth a much better effort with regards to developers. Even updating the Developer site to be more user friendly. Not to mention trying to win developers with free hardware. I bet they will give away free BB10 phones just like they did with the PlayBook

    The free Playbook offer did encourage him to develop for the Playbook. However, while he thinks the Playbook is better then most tablets, he is still developing primarily for iOS still. As his source of income, he cannot turn his back to the largest potential market

    Except for that if you do get a good app, then you have a better chance of reaching the entire market, unlike Android and iOS. And, for some reason, you can charge more and make more money.

    While this point does hold true, he mentioned that the market size does not allow for niche apps. Ones that are so good at what it's purpose for, but has a relatively small scope of use. He brought upon an example close to my interests. For photography, the iPad has a ton of apps that cater to what I could be doing for my business. The Playbook has none. While the iPad app is really amazing, I can't imagine more then a small percentage would actually consider downloading/buying it. But the market size makes it economically feasible for the developer to program it.

    There are definitely some apps that appeal to the wide consumer audience (Facebook, Netflix, Skype, Bank apps, Angry Bird, Dropbox, etc. But with the exception of this relatively small group, apps generally have a specific audience in mind. Al Jazeera and Fox News both have an app on the iPad. Even if a news network were to make an amazing, full featured app, depending on Geography, language, political leanings, and a host of other factors play into whether you're going to download the app (Mind you, this was one example of how a great app may not be a download success.


    I think if a developer is afraid to develop for RIM because they might be going away, then they should just develop in HTML 5. Then they can offer the app on multiple platforms and do minor coding to target a specific device.

    Not knowing any of this programming stuff, I posed the question to him. His response is that programming specifically for iOS or Android gives him more control over the experience. Personally, I didn't know HTML5 could be used to make games and such
    Anyhow, his responses. He did however say that it's not a lost cause for RIM. Microsoft aggressively pursued developers and quickly closed the gap on RIM with amazing apps despite it's tiny market share. When I asked him if he'd ever develop an app for QNX again, he said he's waiting for how much it sells.
    LoganSix and cucvovan like this.
    03-13-12 01:28 PM
  16. Spencerdl's Avatar
    I'm still trying to figure out why the "media" hates RIM (Blackberry) so much, I'm almost sure 90% of them owned a BlackBerry one time or another
    Edit: misread thread title.....I apologize for my response
    Last edited by spencerdl; 03-13-12 at 11:00 PM.
    03-13-12 01:33 PM
  17. LoganSix's Avatar
    When I asked him if he'd ever develop an app for QNX again, he said he's waiting for how much it sells.
    Which means, if BB10 is a hit, he'll be on it. As speculated by me in another thread, I believe that the BB10 phones will run PlayBook apps natively. For non-developers; currently, if you want to code for a phone and a tablet, you have to recompile the code for both, creating two applications. Most likely, there will be things in the phone that can't be used on the tablet. But, based on Tweets and such, it would seem that RIM is going to make it so you can create the app for the PlayBook and it will work on the BB10 phone.

    Frankly, with currently 75 million phone users, the thought of opening up a PlayBook app to 20 million (a conservative guestimate) people instantly is reason enough to program for QNX.
    03-13-12 02:34 PM
  18. tmelon's Avatar
    Because there's no point in developing for an OS that will be replaced with something completely different in less than a year.
    cucvovan likes this.
    03-13-12 10:56 PM
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