1. PHDColumbus's Avatar
    I had this discussion with some kids I work with, then I realized I wasn't completely sure what a SIM Card actually did. I know that the BB has one and I know what it looks like, so I pointed it out for them to prove I had one. They were saying the iphone doesn't have a SIM Card. Is this true?

    I was under the impression that a SIM Card was used for playing media (not storing) and browsing stuff online. What am I missing?

    If anyones curious, I work with juvenile delinquents at a group home. They think they're always right!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-04-10 12:59 PM
  2. the_sandman_454's Avatar
    I had this discussion with some kids I work with, then I realized I wasn't completely sure what a SIM Card actually did. I know that the BB has one and I know what it looks like, so I pointed it out for them to prove I had one. They were saying the iphone doesn't have a SIM Card. Is this true?

    I was under the impression that a SIM Card was used for playing media (not storing) and browsing stuff online. What am I missing?

    If anyones curious, I work with juvenile delinquents at a group home. They think they're always right!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    The SIM card provides your device with information about a GSM network you're on and allows it to work.

    Your Tour has a SIM card, but doesn't use it if you're on Verizon, which is a CDMA network. Verizon has it there on Tour, Bold (9650), Storm 2, etc because those are "world phones".

    Don't confuse the SIM card with the memory card.

    Iphone has a SIM card but it isn't a standard size one. Iphone doesn't have a removable memory card.
    12-04-10 01:04 PM
  3. PHDColumbus's Avatar
    The SIM card provides your device with information about a GSM network you're on and allows it to work.

    Your Tour has a SIM card, but doesn't use it if you're on Verizon, which is a CDMA network. Verizon has it there on Tour, Bold (9650), Storm 2, etc because those are "world phones".

    Don't confuse the SIM card with the memory card.

    Thanks Sandman. I'm def not confusing the SIM with the Memory card, but your insight helps. I am on the Verizon network so that makes plenty of sense.


    Iphone has a SIM card but it isn't a standard size one. Iphone doesn't have a removable memory card.
    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-04-10 01:37 PM
  4. nfld_sapper's Avatar
    I had this discussion with some kids I work with, then I realized I wasn't completely sure what a SIM Card actually did. I know that the BB has one and I know what it looks like, so I pointed it out for them to prove I had one. They were saying the iphone doesn't have a SIM Card. Is this true?

    I was under the impression that a SIM Card was used for playing media (not storing) and browsing stuff online. What am I missing?

    If anyones curious, I work with juvenile delinquents at a group home. They think they're always right!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    A subscriber identity module or subscriber identification module (SIM) on a removable SIM card securely stores the service-subscriber key (IMSI) used to identify a subscriber on mobile telephony devices (such as mobile phones and computers). The SIM card allows users to change phones by simply removing the SIM card from one mobile phone and inserting it into another mobile phone or broadband telephony device.

    A SIM card contains its unique serial number, internationally unique number of the mobile user (IMSI), security authentication and ciphering information, temporary information related to the local network, a list of the services the user has access to and two passwords (PIN for usual use and PUK for unlocking).

    Usage in mobile phone standards

    The use of SIM cards is mandatory in GSM devices. The equivalent of a SIM in UMTS is called the Universal Integrated Circuit Card (UICC), which runs a USIM application, while the Removable User Identity Module (R-UIM) is more popular in CDMA-based devices e.g. CDMA2000. The UICC is still colloquially called a SIM card. Many CDMA-based standards do not include any removable card, and the service is bound to a unique identifier contained in the handset itself.

    The satellite phone networks Iridium, Thuraya and Inmarsat's BGAN also use SIM cards. Sometimes these SIM cards work in regular GSM phones and also allow GSM customers to roam in satellite networks by using their own SIM card in a satellite phone.

    The SIM card introduced a new and significant business opportunity of mobile telecoms operator/carrier business of the mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) which does not own or operate a cellular telecoms network, but which leases capacity from one of the network operators, and only provides a SIM card to its customers. MVNOs first appeared in Denmark, Hong Kong, Finland and the UK and today exist in over 50 countries including most of Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and parts of Asia and account for approximately 10% of all mobile phone subscribers around the world.

    On some networks, the mobile phone is locked to its carrier SIM card e.g. on the GSM networks in the USA, the UK and Poland. This tends to happen only in countries where mobile phones are heavily subsidised, but even then not all countries and not all operators. In the US the phones are locked to the carrier, meaning that only specific carriers' SIM cards will work. In the UK, typically, most phones with subsidies are SIM-locked.

    Phones sold with a contract are often locked (SIM-locked) to the network that provided the phone, since the phones are often subsidized in return for using provider for a minimum term (typically, 12 or 24 months). For example in the UK, a phone that would cost 250 without a contract might be offered free-of-charge with an 18 month contract commitment of 30 per month (540 commitment in total).

    A plethora of online and high-street (third-party) businesses now offer the ability to remove the SIM-lock from a phone, effectively making it possible to then use the phone on any network by inserting a different SIM card. Some of these resellers use wholeseller databases[7]. This is a useful benefit for travellers that might want to put a local SIM card into their phone when they arrive in a country, in order to minimize roaming charges. In many countries, now it is possible to buy a pre-pay SIM card just by walking into a store, and these SIM-only deals are a cost effective way to stay in contact when travelling.

    Phones sold as pre-pay often come with an operator subsidy, especially in competitive mobile markets like the UK. These phones are sold not just through mobile phone stores, but also supermarkets, catalogs, stationery outlets and online; thus the mobile companies are constantly competing to lower the price. Prepay phones come with a bundled SIM, which can be activated by the user in case the phone is bought up. The handsets are often SIM-locked to ensure that the user does not use another operator, allowing the original operator to eventually recoup its subsidy. However, because the units can be unlocked for a small fee (and even the operators themselves offer this service), units can be bought cheaply, separated from the original SIM card and sold on for a profit, perhaps in other markets, perhaps as contract phone. This is known in the industry as box breaking, and often harms the profits of the operator while allowing complicit sales staff and box breakers to reap the rewards. Note that, if a prepaid handset breaks, the SIM card (representing the prepaid account value, plus user's address book, history, etc) can typically be moved to another prepaid handset if the phone-network is the same. That is, the account is tied to the portable SIM card, not the handset, on prepaid phones. This is useful because by 2010, prepaid handsets cost less than the value a user might have stored in an account.

    Mostly, GSM and 3G mobile handsets can easily be SIM-unlocked and used on any suitable network with any SIM card. A notable exception is the Apple iPhone, where in most markets Apple has gone to extreme lengths to lock-down their phones; thus they can only be used with the partner's network. This has led to a popular hack called the jailbreak, which allows custom software unapproved by Apple to run on the phone. Then software can be run to unlock the phone, which frees the iPhone from the partner network; thus any SIM card can be inserted. (Note that jailbreaking, in itself, does not unlock the phone, and has other uses as well.) Apple and the hackers are locked in a war of escalation - described by Apple CEO Steve Jobs as "a game of cat and mouse"[8] - with Apple constantly trying to close loopholes in their operating system, and the hackers finding new ways to jailbreak each version when it becomes available.

    In countries where the phones are not subsidised e.g. Italy and Belgium, all phones are unlocked. Where the phone is not locked to its SIM card, the users can easily switch networks by simply replacing the SIM card of one network with that of another while using only one phone. This is typical, for example, among users who may want to optimise their telecoms traffic by different tariffs to different friends on different networks.

    Dual SIM phones are now made by some mobile phone manufacturers, which save the user from carrying around a separate phone for every number. There are two types, the first, that allow one to switch between the SIMs, and the second, that allow both SIMs to be active simultaneously.
    gmcjing likes this.
    12-04-10 01:50 PM
  5. MarkInTombstone's Avatar
    A subscriber identity module or subscriber identification module (SIM) on a removable SIM card securely stores the service-subscriber key (IMSI) used to identify a subscriber on mobile telephony devices (such as mobile phones and computers). The SIM card allows users to change phones by simply removing the SIM card from one mobile phone and inserting it into another mobile phone or broadband telephony device.

    A SIM card contains its unique serial number, internationally unique number of the mobile user (IMSI), security authentication and ciphering information, temporary information related to the local network, a list of the services the user has access to and two passwords (PIN for usual use and PUK for unlocking).

    Usage in mobile phone standards

    The use of SIM cards is mandatory in GSM devices. The equivalent of a SIM in UMTS is called the Universal Integrated Circuit Card (UICC), which runs a USIM application, while the Removable User Identity Module (R-UIM) is more popular in CDMA-based devices e.g. CDMA2000. The UICC is still colloquially called a SIM card. Many CDMA-based standards do not include any removable card, and the service is bound to a unique identifier contained in the handset itself.

    The satellite phone networks Iridium, Thuraya and Inmarsat's BGAN also use SIM cards. Sometimes these SIM cards work in regular GSM phones and also allow GSM customers to roam in satellite networks by using their own SIM card in a satellite phone.

    The SIM card introduced a new and significant business opportunity of mobile telecoms operator/carrier business of the mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) which does not own or operate a cellular telecoms network, but which leases capacity from one of the network operators, and only provides a SIM card to its customers. MVNOs first appeared in Denmark, Hong Kong, Finland and the UK and today exist in over 50 countries including most of Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and parts of Asia and account for approximately 10% of all mobile phone subscribers around the world.

    On some networks, the mobile phone is locked to its carrier SIM card e.g. on the GSM networks in the USA, the UK and Poland. This tends to happen only in countries where mobile phones are heavily subsidised, but even then not all countries and not all operators. In the US the phones are locked to the carrier, meaning that only specific carriers' SIM cards will work. In the UK, typically, most phones with subsidies are SIM-locked.

    Phones sold with a contract are often locked (SIM-locked) to the network that provided the phone, since the phones are often subsidized in return for using provider for a minimum term (typically, 12 or 24 months). For example in the UK, a phone that would cost 250 without a contract might be offered free-of-charge with an 18 month contract commitment of 30 per month (540 commitment in total).

    A plethora of online and high-street (third-party) businesses now offer the ability to remove the SIM-lock from a phone, effectively making it possible to then use the phone on any network by inserting a different SIM card. Some of these resellers use wholeseller databases[7]. This is a useful benefit for travellers that might want to put a local SIM card into their phone when they arrive in a country, in order to minimize roaming charges. In many countries, now it is possible to buy a pre-pay SIM card just by walking into a store, and these SIM-only deals are a cost effective way to stay in contact when travelling.

    Phones sold as pre-pay often come with an operator subsidy, especially in competitive mobile markets like the UK. These phones are sold not just through mobile phone stores, but also supermarkets, catalogs, stationery outlets and online; thus the mobile companies are constantly competing to lower the price. Prepay phones come with a bundled SIM, which can be activated by the user in case the phone is bought up. The handsets are often SIM-locked to ensure that the user does not use another operator, allowing the original operator to eventually recoup its subsidy. However, because the units can be unlocked for a small fee (and even the operators themselves offer this service), units can be bought cheaply, separated from the original SIM card and sold on for a profit, perhaps in other markets, perhaps as contract phone. This is known in the industry as box breaking, and often harms the profits of the operator while allowing complicit sales staff and box breakers to reap the rewards. Note that, if a prepaid handset breaks, the SIM card (representing the prepaid account value, plus user's address book, history, etc) can typically be moved to another prepaid handset if the phone-network is the same. That is, the account is tied to the portable SIM card, not the handset, on prepaid phones. This is useful because by 2010, prepaid handsets cost less than the value a user might have stored in an account.

    Mostly, GSM and 3G mobile handsets can easily be SIM-unlocked and used on any suitable network with any SIM card. A notable exception is the Apple iPhone, where in most markets Apple has gone to extreme lengths to lock-down their phones; thus they can only be used with the partner's network. This has led to a popular hack called the jailbreak, which allows custom software unapproved by Apple to run on the phone. Then software can be run to unlock the phone, which frees the iPhone from the partner network; thus any SIM card can be inserted. (Note that jailbreaking, in itself, does not unlock the phone, and has other uses as well.) Apple and the hackers are locked in a war of escalation - described by Apple CEO Steve Jobs as "a game of cat and mouse"[8] - with Apple constantly trying to close loopholes in their operating system, and the hackers finding new ways to jailbreak each version when it becomes available.

    In countries where the phones are not subsidised e.g. Italy and Belgium, all phones are unlocked. Where the phone is not locked to its SIM card, the users can easily switch networks by simply replacing the SIM card of one network with that of another while using only one phone. This is typical, for example, among users who may want to optimise their telecoms traffic by different tariffs to different friends on different networks.

    Dual SIM phones are now made by some mobile phone manufacturers, which save the user from carrying around a separate phone for every number. There are two types, the first, that allow one to switch between the SIMs, and the second, that allow both SIMs to be active simultaneously.
    Too much reading

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-04-10 05:06 PM
  6. M_rk's Avatar
    your SIM card and your mobile number are one. its in between your mobile phone and the carrier. we can swap phones but if we dont swap SIMs we will STILL get calls/texts from our own contacts.
    12-05-10 09:18 PM
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