08-23-13 08:13 PM
41 12
tools
  1. hootyhoo's Avatar
    If, pretty soon, your phone is who you are then identification is going to be just as important as device-to-device security. In less than 2 weeks, Apple is going to announce the new iPhone with a fingerprint sensor built into the home button. How is anyone going to beat that for convenient ID verification in the next year?
    08-23-13 10:59 AM
  2. hootyhoo's Avatar
    If, pretty soon, your phone is who you are then identification is going to be just as important as device-to-device security. In less than 2 weeks, Apple is going to announce the new iPhone with a fingerprint sensor built into the home button. How is anyone going to beat that for convenient ID verification in the next year?
    Google Motorola Atrix.
    08-23-13 11:00 AM
  3. qbnkelt's Avatar
    Google Motorola Atrix.
    Yup, three years ago, actually......I know, I had it.
    08-23-13 11:04 AM
  4. qcbarry25's Avatar
    Yup, three years ago, actually......I know, I had it.
    i actually want a function like that on my s4. i don't set a pw on my device since i hate unlocking and typing in the pw, but if i can just press a button with my finger and have security also it would be great.
    08-23-13 11:15 AM
  5. keypad's Avatar
    Something like, Ubuntu's Mobile platform.
    08-23-13 11:33 AM
  6. anon1727506's Avatar
    Finger Print scanners have been around on Desktops, Laptop and a few mobile devices for a while..

    But I think more and more people today are locking their devices, a few years ago I could pick up almost anyones phone and it was unlocked. Today maybe 1 in 5 are locked. IF there was an easier way to lock a device, I think more people would do it. (why doesn't BB10 allow either simple passwords or better yet pattern or swiping). Apple is great at taking existing tech, and making it work for them.

    As for Mobile Computing, the day that someone want to put a chip in my head...

    I personally think the "cloud" is going to be the computer, that the devices are only going to be access points (displays & inputs) - car, TV, desktop at work, mobile device of some type..... Look at Google and how many services then now offer that are "cloud" based - Office, Image Processing, Social Networks, Communications. Google is going to push this and Apple is going to push this - and I bet that you will still have to use their access point devices, or pay a premium to use their systems. Not a lot of money in free and open, unless they can fully charge for the "cloud" access.

    I think it is more likely that a Bank or Walmart will know who you are, by using facial recognition and their own databases. Not because you are carrying a device or have allowed someone to put a chip in you. Device could be stolen, as well as someone could drill a hole in your head and steal your chip. But it is hard to steal your face or have you give up a passcode. You would probably still use a card or device to select the payment source, but the verification and identification would be the same one we all use to identify people.
    08-23-13 11:34 AM
  7. VizN's Avatar
    Even then they had vulnerabilities (not many, of course, but some). Would you be willing to risk virtually EVERYTHING in this?
    First, please allow me to clarify the argument. I am not suggesting that our phones should become the only device that connects us to everything. My point is that going forward, security is absolutely essential in a world encompassed by the internet of things. In this regard, BlackBerry has never lost focus yet to the ordinary consumer that does not understand or look to the future, apps and widgets are what matter. More praise is given to Apple (and Samsung, etc.) for their innovations but to build a mobile computing PLATFORM that is also SECURE and SCALABLE should be recognized for its genius.

    Not only that but what about all those individuals that lose their phone? You now have lost your keys, your ID, your banking information, everything in one fell swoop. That would be catastrophic, how could you then verify anything.
    Here is a clear example of the benefits of BBOS7/BIS which goes unnoticed to the majority of people. Users can do a remote wipe and restore their data on another phone. Hence the reason these phones are still the most secure phones produced by BlackBerry. To do this on a BB10 phone requires BES10 since ordinary consumers don't seem to care about security at this point in time and it doesn't make sense to charge them a monthly service fee for it.

    Oh trust me, I know we're on our path. But I like to compartmentalise my life......I keep little bits available for specific people and situation. That's how I ensure that there isn't "one ring to rule them all."

    I of course do online banking. But I even go to the extreme of compartmentalising that. I've got three different banks which I use for specific purposes and where I keep different amounts. One, my "main" account, does not get used for any online transaction other than actual withdrawals and my mortgage.

    I manage risk. It's what I do as part of my job. One single point of failure is catastrophic.
    I understand the purpose of all this and the reason for your worries but going forward it will only become more difficult to manage so many different profiles. Survival of the fittest is define by those who are able to adapt. Bank accounts are still tied to one SIN/SSID and it's not hard to imagine a future when individual's identities are shared among various databases just like Google, Facebook, or LinkedIn can suggest people you know by associating your email address and cross referencing it with their own internal database of information.

    Perhaps you can still attempt to "compartmentalise" your identity. A Microsoft profile for your household; to control access to your front door and maintain the settings around your home. A Google to manage your searches, spending, travel, and overall lifestyle. A second Google profile to use as a backup. An Apple profile for the kids. An ePost profile to manage your bills and accounts. A government profile to manage your tax account, passport, and other forms of identification. And a BlackBerry profile to securely provide access to all other profiles and accounts by creating a standard interface with the best multitasking operating system to manage and "rule them all."
    08-23-13 12:01 PM
  8. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    But I think more and more people today are locking their devices, a few years ago I could pick up almost anyones phone and it was unlocked. Today maybe 1 in 5 are locked. IF there was an easier way to lock a device, I think more people would do it. (why doesn't BB10 allow either simple passwords or better yet pattern or swiping).
    Google was just awarded a patent for a feature they'll have out soon: geolocated "safe zones" you can set up where your phone will unlock with just a swipe (say, at home, or at your parents' house, or even at work if you deem it appropriate), and whenever you are outside of one of those safe zones, full unlock security is automatically re-enabled, so you have to use your password (or even two-part verification, if you have that set up).
    anon1727506 likes this.
    08-23-13 12:17 PM
  9. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Here is a clear example of the benefits of BBOS7/BIS which goes unnoticed to the majority of people. Users can do a remote wipe and restore their data on another phone. Hence the reason these phones are still the most secure phones produced by BlackBerry. To do this on a BB10 phone requires BES10 since ordinary consumers don't seem to care about security at this point in time and it doesn't make sense to charge them a monthly service fee for it.
    Other platforms can certainly do this. It's insanely easy to move from one Android phone to another, since almost everything is automatically cloud-synced. Moving from my last phone to my Nexus 4, only a single app (out of 68) didn't cloud-sync its data. That is the only data I would have lost had I lost or broke the phone, and it would have meant next to nothing to me. I have an app to locate and remote-wipe the phone, but now Google has a tool for that built-in to Google Play Store registration, making it super-easy.
    bp3dots likes this.
    08-23-13 12:24 PM
  10. earlym's Avatar
    I envision it as having information readily at your fingertips whereever you go. Routine tasks simplified. Smartphone used to the fullest extent including medical scanning for remote office visits. Also, most everything remotely controlled can be done so with them.

    3D Holographic conferencing, virtual projection & touring, 3D remote viewer emersion, smell a vision, tactile touch via smartphone, virtual tasting, virtual document signing and more.

    Go BB!
    08-23-13 12:50 PM
  11. gg bb's Avatar
    Well you'd think it was computing but apparently it's gaming, gossiping and watching naughty videos!

    Posted via CB10
    08-23-13 01:25 PM
  12. BitPusher2600's Avatar
    I remember in the late 80's when computers in the home where just becoming a big deal that doing anything that produced a result was considered "computing", like typing a document rather than writing it by hand, or even something as simple as loading a program. By that definition, or even within that vicinity, we already have mobile computing in our hands. The things a smartphone can do at their present state, to me, is the definiton of mobile computing; doing the things you would have to have a computer to do, but mobile in the sense that it's in the palm of your hand.

    What else is there to envision short of fantasizing how much further the experience we already have can be different? Projecting touch screen virtual interfaces onto the wall or into mid-air via holograms? Considering nothing like what we have now remotely existed when I was a child, I love mobile computing as it is. Other than say burning a CD or DVD, or using Photoshop, everything I could possibly want to accomplish that is relevant to me specifically is already in my hands in the form of this BlackBerry. I have the softwares I need, and I can download files from the web, interact with them accordingly, and shoot them off elsewhere. Every viable form of communication is available to, but people so easily take all that for granted and want more (how would you have contacted someone at all in another state or another country prior to computers? Postal mail or long distance charges.)

    Being one who is more oriented to appreciating the basics and going from there, I love mobile computing as it is.
    08-23-13 03:16 PM
  13. notfanboy's Avatar
    Yes it does to a point. But to Q's point, it is a single point of failure. If you lose your device, it acts as your car keys, your phone, your house keys, your wallet, your ID, your money, etc etc. Seems it would cause significant issues in that case, if only acting as these things.
    If you lose your phone, then wipe it remotely. Get out your old phone, or buy a new one, sign in with your account and you're back in business. All your data on the cloud will still be there.

    If you lose your wallet, you're in bigger trouble. You have to call multiple banks, credit card companies, government agencies and report your stuff stolen. You're always nervous because you can't be sure you remembered to call everyone needed.

    I have my smartphone set up so that if it wanders out of bluetooth range, the phone locks itself. I get notified on my watch and if I decide the phone is stolen, I'd log on to the nearest web browser and wipe the phone.
    08-23-13 03:30 PM
  14. notfanboy's Avatar

    But I think more and more people today are locking their devices, a few years ago I could pick up almost anyones phone and it was unlocked. Today maybe 1 in 5 are locked. IF there was an easier way to lock a device, I think more people would do it. (why doesn't BB10 allow either simple passwords or better yet pattern or swiping). Apple is great at taking existing tech, and making it work for them.
    I'm test driving a Pebble Smartwatch. One app is called Pebble Locker.

    I hate having a lock on my phone because it slows everything down. With the smartwatch I have it configured so that whenever the phone is in bluetooth range of the watch, then there is no lock screen. If I wander away from my phone and the BT connection is lost, the phone locks itself. The watch will also tell you if you have lost connection to the phone.

    It's so convenient!
    08-23-13 03:34 PM
  15. notfanboy's Avatar
    Just another example. A startup based in Ottawa is getting ready to launch Piper, an interesting all-in-one home automation and monitoring package.

    Piper Is The Prettiest Way To Monitor Your Home From Afar | TechCrunch

    Despite being Canadian and right in QNX' backyard, this M2M solution is based on Linux and only supports iOS and Android devices.
    08-23-13 07:40 PM
  16. sinsin07's Avatar
    +20years
    It becomes a chip that is implanted into your body that is able to read brain queues. This "chip" then connects to the world around you and will amplify the thoughts you have. In essence, you can control the things around you by simply "thinking" of it.
    And one day the insides of your eyelids will read: "You've been hacked."
    imz likes this.
    08-23-13 08:13 PM
41 12

Similar Threads

  1. Mobile Web Toolkit for PlayBook
    By RapsFan1981 in forum PlayBook Apps & Games
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-04-13, 03:49 PM
  2. Q10 - Subscribe to Threads?
    By jdavison in forum BlackBerry Q10
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-26-13, 07:33 PM
  3. OS Slow to Do Many Basic Tasks?
    By SoxFan in forum BlackBerry Q10
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-24-13, 10:51 AM
  4. What is the last black themed build for the SQN-1?
    By Benjamin Black in forum BB10 Leaked/Beta OS
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-24-13, 09:47 AM
  5. How to know if blackberry is fully charged?
    By Kiel Maru Vasquez in forum General BlackBerry Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-24-13, 08:02 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD