1. world saviour's Avatar
    Here's what I found on the net, in a cite called 'rense.com'.
    US Police Can Copy Your iPhones Contents In Under Two Minutes

    It has emerged that Michigan State Police have been using a high-tech mobile forensics device that can extract information from over 3,000 models of mobile phone, potentially grabbing all media content from your iPhone in under two minutes.

    The CelleBrite UFED is a handheld device that Michigan officers have been using since August 2008 to copy information from mobile phones belonging to motorists stopped for minor traffic violations. The device can circumvent password restrictions and extract existing, hidden, and deleted phone data, including call history, text messages, contacts, images, and geotags.

    In short, it can copy everything on your smartphone in a matter of minutes.

    Learning that the police had been using mobile forensic devices, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has issued freedom of information requests which demand that state officials open up the data collected, to better assess if penalised motorists warrant having their data copied.

    Michigan State Police were more than happy to provide the information as long as the ACLU paid $544,680. Obviously not pocket change.

    Love my BlackBerry. I'm not surprised.
    04-09-12 08:18 AM
  2. Mattma43's Avatar
    Looks like all they have to do is get the right software.

    BlackBerry Breakthrough for Cellebrite’s UFED System
    We are proud to be the first to release physical extraction and decoding for dozens of BlackBerry devices via the UFED Ultimate.

    The physical extraction for unlocked devices only is performed using Cellebrite’s proprietary boot loaders, in a forensically sound manner.

    This release enables decoding for BlackBerry NAND devices running OS 4, 5, 6 and 7 physical extraction.

    Device info
    Address book
    SMS
    Call logs
    MMS (including attachments)
    Email (excluding attachments)
    Installed applications
    Paired Bluetooth devices
    BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) contacts and chat
    Deleted data and much more
    04-09-12 08:23 AM
  3. world saviour's Avatar
    Quess it was a matter of time. Do we dare ask the question. WHAT'S NEXT?!
    04-09-12 08:30 AM
  4. Ben1232's Avatar
    If iphone users are afraid of the police extracting information from their iphones whilst being pulled over just remove the iphones battery........ermm oh.

    Yeah I darent ponder what's next
    04-09-12 08:49 AM
  5. crackberryjill's Avatar
    It seems though that for BB password protected or encrypted phones, the password has to be known, so it can't get past the password unless the person using the device knows the password.

    So if pulled up by the cops, lock your phone.

    Here is the link to the Blackberry FAQ about the device:

    Cellebrite - BlackBerry physical FAQ
    world saviour likes this.
    04-09-12 08:49 AM
  6. kbz1960's Avatar
    Looks like all they have to do is get the right software.

    BlackBerry Breakthrough for Cellebrites UFED System
    We are proud to be the first to release physical extraction and decoding for dozens of BlackBerry devices via the UFED Ultimate.

    The physical extraction for unlocked devices only is performed using Cellebrites proprietary boot loaders, in a forensically sound manner.

    This release enables decoding for BlackBerry NAND devices running OS 4, 5, 6 and 7 physical extraction.

    Device info
    Address book
    SMS
    Call logs
    MMS (including attachments)
    Email (excluding attachments)
    Installed applications
    Paired Bluetooth devices
    BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) contacts and chat
    Deleted data and much more
    So they have to install their proprietary boot loader on your phone first?
    04-09-12 08:58 AM
  7. crackberryjill's Avatar
    So they have to install their proprietary boot loader on your phone first?
    This would be done after they have extracted all the info from your phone and gone back to the lab.

    You will notice for BB it is unlocked phones only.

    For iPhones, the device can get past the password and download all the files. Then when they go back to the lab, use password generators to get in.

    With the BB, they can't get into the phone unless they use the password, so they can't download and then use a password generator to get in. They have to know the password in the first place. And I assume the police don't ask for it. This is done quietly without your knowledge.
    04-09-12 09:10 AM
  8. conix67's Avatar
    People. This is a Playbook forum.
    04-09-12 09:11 AM
  9. crackberryjill's Avatar
    People. This is a Playbook forum.
    This is true, but you can bet that it will soon be out there for tablets as well, as so many people carry them with them.

    There would be a lot of info to be grabbed from anyone with both their phone and tablet in their car.

    Its only a small jump.
    04-09-12 09:19 AM
  10. elshaman's Avatar
    Question: what's their gain of copying your data? Dont they need a warrant for that?

    If a traffic violation, even if u r talking in the phone or texting while driving which I'm against...they're can't do that...I think...I don't see a purpose in that, just to check the nude pics u have or the mp3..

    But I'm from DR...we don't have those issues here....
    04-09-12 09:29 AM
  11. kbz1960's Avatar
    They aren't interested in your pictures unless they are of you with their wife. More interested in your messages to see if you're a drug dealer or terrorist etc.

    It's all in the name of keeping us "safe".
    04-09-12 09:34 AM
  12. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    It says unlocked devices only.

    Smartphone: I have data at rest encryption set to strongest and a complex password. Good luck.
    Playbook: Complex password and AES256 encrypted work data and no personal on my work device. Personal device has a complex password and the native file encryption (not sure the specs, will have to look it up). But RIM will likely be adding additional security options in the future.
    04-09-12 09:46 AM
  13. califlefty's Avatar
    Well if it's on the internet, it MUST be true, right? By the way, your source is a notorious hate site - which reflects badly on you. This thread is not about the playbook.
    04-09-12 09:49 AM
  14. PatrickMJS's Avatar
    I looked at the website and I see that the Cellubrite device must be physically connected to the phone in order to perform the extraction. If the cops want to look at your phone, they'll just ask you for the password. If you don't give it to them, I am sure they have other ways of getting you to cooperate.
    04-09-12 09:49 AM
  15. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    For the record, no one seems to think that this happens in mobile stores all the time. Most people don't care but those that do should be paranoid about anyone getting access to their device.
    04-09-12 09:53 AM
  16. crackberryjill's Avatar
    I looked at the website and I see that the Cellubrite device must be physically connected to the phone in order to perform the extraction. If the cops want to look at your phone, they'll just ask you for the password. If you don't give it to them, I am sure they have other ways of getting you to cooperate.
    You know you are right. I took the original OP word and simply looked up the faq's.

    Again, there I was "assuming" without checking back.

    Bad me.

    So, so far we are safe in all aspects.
    04-09-12 10:12 AM
  17. JAGWIRE's Avatar
    this is a very scarey notion to be happening. i hope RIM fixes this with an update. Im not a "bad guy" by any stretch of he word but i still don't want people looking at my personal stuff, its just rude.
    Scotter75 likes this.
    04-09-12 10:15 AM
  18. xandermac's Avatar
    Just understand your rights. If you're stopped for a traffic violation you have no obligation to hand over your phone for a warrant less search. The suit against Homeland will certainly ban this practice.


    Sent from my iPhone4s using Tapatalk
    04-09-12 10:29 AM
  19. anthogag's Avatar
    I doubt the police can secretly take info from any phone, this is an extreme invasion of privacy

    LOL from speeding ticket to sucking all the info from a phone
    04-09-12 10:54 AM
  20. Muttypint's Avatar
    One good thing with the bb is the secure system,

    But once they take your phone from you, no system is secure anymore
    04-09-12 10:57 AM
  21. xandermac's Avatar
    FYI. From the cellebrite ufed documentation.

    "UFED Ultimate also gives you the widest support in the industry - thousands of mobile phones, smartphones and GPS devices, and covering all major mobile OS: iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Symbian, Windows Mobile and Palm.".

    http://www.cellebrite.com/mobile-for...-ultimate.html

    I'll add that since every article I can find on this specifies "iPhone" in the title I hope it lays to rest the RIM conspiracy theories around here.

    Sent from my iPhone4s using Tapatalk
    Last edited by xandermac; 04-09-12 at 11:12 AM.
    04-09-12 11:01 AM
  22. ItsMeBB's Avatar
    How do I lock my BB 9650?
    04-09-12 11:34 AM
  23. world saviour's Avatar
    FYI. From the cellebrite ufed documentation.

    "UFED Ultimate also gives you the widest support in the industry - thousands of mobile phones, smartphones and GPS devices, and covering all major mobile OS: iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Symbian, Windows Mobile and Palm.".

    Cellebrite - UFED Ultimate

    I'll add that since every article I can find on this specifies "iPhone" in the title I hope it lays to rest the RIM conspiracy theories around here.

    Sent from my iPhone4s using Tapatalk
    I've been and will continue to stay with RIM BLACKBERRY for two main reasons : security and practicality. No RIM conspiracy theories here, just found interesting information. I know people with BlackBerry and IPhones, and they occasionally visit CB so I figured it might be more out there.
    04-09-12 11:55 AM
  24. hornlovah's Avatar
    How do I lock my BB 9650?
    Here's the BlackBerry documentation for that: Turn on encryption. If you choose to encrypt your media card and you should, use the third option, Security Password & Device mode. You may not be writing anything confidential to your media card, but sometimes apps do in an easily readable format.

    General Information for BlackBerry owners:
    An unlocked device is vulnerable to a number of widely available extraction tools.

    A password protected, non-encrypted BlackBerry is safe against quick extraction tools like UFED Ultimate, but law enforcement has ability to extract information by desoldering the non-volatile memory and reading it with a chip reader. Celebrite recently released commercial software to interpret these dumps.
    A locked, encrypted BlackBerry provides protection against all currently known physical extraction methods if media card encryption is configured properly. Elcomsoft just released beta software that can decrypt a chip-off device dump if media card encryption is set to Device mode. They can also extract a devices passcode if media card encryption is set to Security (or Device) password mode and a simple passcode is used.
    ItsMeBB likes this.
    04-09-12 02:15 PM
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