12-24-11 07:37 AM
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  1. elvin1983's Avatar
    Well that would explain the issue I had when I started using the PB charger!
    11-28-11 02:25 PM
  2. chuckwalla's Avatar
    I worked for a mobile electronics manufacture for a while designing changers and batteries. All the lithium single cell batteries/ chargers we designed, used a constant current - constant voltage topology. The charger delivered a constant current to the battery until the cell reached a voltage of appox. 4.2 volts. Then switched to constant voltage mode and the current would drop to a low level. The cell would be at about 90% capacity at this point and most devices would indicate full charge after being in CC mode for a few minutes. However, if you wanted 100% cell capacity, the battery would need to stay in CC mode for 2 to 3 hours. Probably more info than you were looking for.
    HershL and sulcopete like this.
    11-28-11 02:59 PM
  3. Jake Storm's Avatar
    I've been using the PB charger on my 9900 since Sept.
    No problem with battery life.
    11-28-11 03:27 PM
  4. Xterra2's Avatar
    Thank you OP interesting observation
    I would be using the nokia charger to charge my 9900 also
    9900 arriving on saturday cant wait
    11-28-11 03:50 PM
  5. olblueyez's Avatar
    Anyone else notice the included charger doesn't charge the phone to 100%?

    How bout the "Green Notification" when you turn the phone off during charging and the phone reaches 100%?

    According to Battery University the best way to fully charge a Li-Ion/Li-Po is to switch the device off. This parallels the Green Notification I get when the phone is fully charged and switched off.
    Last edited by olblueyez; 11-28-11 at 06:49 PM.
    11-28-11 06:43 PM
  6. olblueyez's Avatar
    Thank you OP interesting observation
    I would be using the nokia charger to charge my 9900 also
    9900 arriving on saturday cant wait
    Glad to help! Make sure to let everyone know how it works for you.
    11-28-11 06:52 PM
  7. T
    Anyone else notice the included charger doesn't charge the phone to 100%?
    I never noticed this. These days I'm using a cradle, but that shouldn't make any difference; it's still the original charger that plugs into it.
    How bout the "Green Notification" when you turn the phone off during charging and the phone reaches 100%?

    According to Battery University the best way to fully charge a Li-Ion/Li-Po is to switch the device off. This parallels the Green Notification I get when the phone is fully charged and switched off.
    I never noticed the green notification. Do you mean the green LED coverage indicator comes on?
    11-28-11 06:57 PM
  8. anon1937793's Avatar
    I did a test when I first bought my playbook... if you use the PB charger on a regular Blackberry, the battery charges using the same current as the regular charger, it makes no difference. If you tried to charge a Blackberry at 1.8 A it would probably explode . If anybody wants to verify this... just unlock the OS engineering screen, and there is a page where you can view the "charging current". Plug in a regular Blackberry charger and the PB and you will see the charging current stays the same. I did this on my 9700... but I assume the newer Blackberries would be the same.

    As for using a 500 mA charger to slow charge it... this could have an impact. At the very least the battery itself would last longer (as in maybe it would last 3 years as opposed to 2, you would get more charge cycles), but I doubt it can actually effect the maximum capacity of the battery.

    FYI: USB slots on computers are supposed to be rated at 500 mAh... but in reality they are usually more like 250 - 400... that is why some people plug their BB's into their computer and they don't charge at all.

    I worked for a medical device manufacturer that sold battery operated medical products. One of the most boring things I did was test batteries / chargers to see what combination worked best, lasted longest, and provided the best long term solution. We were using NiMH batteries for the products, but also tested rechargeable 3.7 V lithium batteries to see if we got better results. The results we got were: The higher a current you use to charge the batteries, the less recharges you get. A lower current provided a maximum number of recharges. We didn't get a difference in actual maximum capacity though...

    If anybody has a volt meter, and goes to radio shack and buys some ceramic resistors you can do an easy test. Just short the Blackberry battery through a bunch of ceramic resistors (maybe drawing say 250 mA, and no, shorting the battery through resistors will not hurt it unless you don't put enough of them), and monitor the voltage over time. Measure the exact time it takes a fully charged battery to drop to 3 V. Then charge it back up again using the different chargers and repeat the test. Don't let it go much below 3 V as that could damage your battery.

    On the other hand you might not want to do this test... as it will probably just prove it makes no difference and it's all in your heads.
    11-28-11 07:23 PM
  9. olblueyez's Avatar
    Perhaps it is the quality of the charger and not the speed at which it charges but the charger Blackberry puts in the box provides you with a charge that drains very fast. The difference is not subtle.

    Other users mentioned the old style charger with the folding blades provided a better charge than the new unit. I believe its 700mA instead of 750mA like the newer unit.

    Testing batteries is fine but I think it needs to be mentioned that shorting your battery improperly can ruin your battery, I think.
    Last edited by olblueyez; 11-28-11 at 08:21 PM.
    11-28-11 08:18 PM
  10. anon1937793's Avatar
    Perhaps it is the quality of the charger and not the speed at which it charges but the charger Blackberry puts in the box provides you with a charge that drains very fast. The difference is not subtle.

    Other users mentioned the old style charger with the folding blades provided a better charge than the new unit. I believe its 700mA instead of 750mA like the newer unit.

    Testing batteries is fine but I think it needs to be mentioned that shorting your battery improperly can ruin your battery, I think.
    Right you are shorting your battery improperly can ruin it. But performing a test by shorting your battery through a set of resistors is the same as just draining it normally through your phone. And it would give you proof either way of all the theories about different chargers.
    11-28-11 08:54 PM
  11. chuckwalla's Avatar
    Discharging a battery with resistors in not the same as discharging in your phone. The load profile of a GSM (or CDMA or TDMA or iDEN) phone is very dynamic. Resistors will give a much more linear profile. But, a valid test could use resistors to measure the capacity under the correct conditions.

    Most of the time, the best capacity is reached while charging at .5 - .75 times the cell's C rate in a CC -- CV charger and letting it charging another two - three hours after the "green" condition. (Just let it charge overnight )

    And yes, if you are using a typical 700mA charger, the battery will charge faster if the phone is off. If the phone is on, some of the charging current is used to power the phone, not to charge the battery. Also, on most if not all phones, the charging circuit is in the phone, not in the wall charger thats is just a power supply. It provides the correct voltage and current for the charger.
    I would guess if you are seeing a difference in charging time with a higher rated wall PS, its because it has more head room to power the phone and supply the charger.
    11-29-11 09:18 AM
  12. T
    Good info. But I think people are reporting that a slower charge with less than maximum current is yielding a better charge.
    11-29-11 09:30 AM
  13. chuckwalla's Avatar
    Yes, a lower charge current may give better capacity, but will take longer to charge.
    11-29-11 09:47 AM
  14. Apple Crumble's Avatar
    Just got my shipping notice for my 1p Genuine Nokia charger (free shipping)!!!

    Will post back with my expert and scientific findings
    11-29-11 09:53 AM
  15. T
    Yes, a lower charge current may give better capacity, but will take longer to charge.
    Thanks for confirming it!
    11-29-11 10:01 AM
  16. sleepngbear's Avatar
    Anyone else notice the included charger doesn't charge the phone to 100%?

    How bout the "Green Notification" when you turn the phone off during charging and the phone reaches 100%?

    According to Battery University the best way to fully charge a Li-Ion/Li-Po is to switch the device off. This parallels the Green Notification I get when the phone is fully charged and switched off.
    Mine said it was at 100% this morning, but it dropped like a rock in the 40 minutes from the charger to work. I had it on the PB charger for awhile last night. It seems to be slowing down a bit now, but it's still up around 7% doing not much of anything. Where can I get my hands on one of those slow charging things?

    Edit: Found a 550mAh travel charger at Amazon. Will give it a try.
    Last edited by 18to7fiddy; 11-29-11 at 10:50 AM.
    11-29-11 10:19 AM
  17. dog_soldier's Avatar
    my 9630 was only down 1 bar when i put it on the USB hooked to my desktop this morning. after 3 hours the green light came on. ill do a update tomorrow afternoon how well it does. i use my phone to listen to the radio at work before the store opens while we put stock away.
    11-29-11 10:30 AM
  18. nubgen's Avatar
    I will have to test this out myself.
    11-30-11 12:01 AM
  19. youknwwho's Avatar
    Just turn off my 9650 and charge it for about 2.5 hrs and wait for the green LED to be on for 10 min which must mean it's at full. The usual charge last half a day, let's see how this pan out.
    11-30-11 11:32 AM
  20. Damien_Eternal's Avatar
    Ive noticed that trickle charges are the best way to go. The faster the battery is charged, the faster it discharges. Also, the faster chargers will shorten overall battery life and you will have to buy a new battery sooner. This is the same reason the charger used for your car battery takes so long to charge it. Not because they cant be charged faster - there are chargers that can charge one in 25min - but because the trickle charge is a higher quality charge and doesnt reduce overall battery life.

    Think about it this way:
    You have a project you need to work on. You can either do it fast as you can, and risk making mistakes or missing some details, or you can choose to take your time, and make sure everything is done right and you haven't overlooked anything. Its the same concept. A rush job is rarely a high quality job.
    11-30-11 11:45 AM
  21. ups925's Avatar
    i use my playbook charger exclusively on my phone. i bought a second one to keep at the office. when necessary ill charge vis my cars usb jack but that is only to prevent it from dying, not necessarily to "charge" it. i unplug my phone as soon as bebuzz notifies me via a disco led that its fully charged. i figured if i use the stock bb charger that it would charge slower = longer time plugged in = less time unplugged = seems like a better battery life. i contemplated using the stock charger for this reason but i get over a full days use right now and its very convient to speed charge my phone. i used to carry extra batteries but now im able to quickly charge my phone in under an hour. being able to replace my phones battery is one reason im against iphones. a shorter lifespan of the battery is not an issue, since i used to have three batteries and now due to the playbook charger i only need the one it came with.
    11-30-11 01:04 PM
  22. laurah2215's Avatar
    Using a slower charger should be better for the battery's long term health. Check out Battery University. Great advice there.
    11-30-11 03:49 PM
  23. dictoresno's Avatar
    i was arguing with a coworker about this today. he stated he charges his iphone up to 100% at night and then unplugs it. then first thing in the morning, its still at 100% (which i cant believe, i would imagine it would at least be down to 97-98%) and then it slowly discharges during use for the day. much better than by keeping it on a charger all night long.
    11-30-11 08:48 PM
  24. olblueyez's Avatar
    I got the new chargers in Wednesday. I left my Wifes 9810 plugged in to the Nokia over night and Thursday I was able to wipe the 9810, load .540, reinstall her apps and set everything up the way she likes it. It was plugged into the computer for about 15 minutes for the wipe and install. Blackberry Protect reinstalled her wireless profile so I switched the wireless on along with the 4G and sat unplugged for most of the afternoon downloading, installing, pressing accept, installing keycodes, and setting up panels and folders.

    The phone was at 60-65% when I was done.

    Prior to the Nokia we used the Blackberry unit 5V@750mA and a Motorola that puts out 5V@850mA.

    This makes (2) OS7 devices we have that are getting better battery life with the Nokia AC-6U that puts out 5V@550mA.
    12-02-11 02:18 AM
  25. youngguy7's Avatar
    Thanks for the heads up, I've ordered the UK one from Amazon, for a whole 1p & free shipping (Black Friday promo)

    And in the voice of Dr Pepper 'Whats the worst that can happen'
    Can you please share the link or at least the UK model number for the charger?
    12-06-11 05:56 PM
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