1. olga421's Avatar
    as of to date,do blackberry smartphones have the best security for vital data? also where does the new iphone 4s stand in comparison to the blackberry security?
    10-11-11 06:48 PM
  2. Rootbrian's Avatar
    Blackberry has the best security, it's not hackable, it's encrypted. Google is your friend, dismiss what other say. When it comes to your own preferences, you are the one to decide, not others.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    10-12-11 04:47 AM
  3. rdkempt's Avatar
    As of today, Blackberry smartphones have the WORST updating process, which means, if (when) an exploit is discovered it may be months before RIM fixes the issue and a few more months from when you get the update from your carrier you need to secure your phone and your data.
    10-12-11 07:21 AM
  4. olga421's Avatar
    I don't know about that,I get notified pretty quickly,the iphone security no one wants to answer me regarding its security,if someone with vital data will trust it,like they would a Blackberry???? Yes or no pls
    10-12-11 08:15 AM
  5. rdkempt's Avatar
    I don't know about that,I get notified pretty quickly,the iphone security no one wants to answer me regarding its security,if someone with vital data will trust it,like they would a Blackberry???? Yes or no pls
    Absolutely.

    Pwn2Own day 2: iPhone, BlackBerry beaten; Chrome, Firefox no-shows

    QUOTE:
    RIM has arguably made its platform more approachable to hackers and researchers alike. Were it not for this obscurity, the lack of DEP, ASLR, and code signing would leave it easy to attack, with Iozzo describing it as "way behind the iPhone at the moment, from a security perspective."

    RIM has shipped a newer firmware since, but Pinckaers has confirmed that the flaw still exists.


    ^ It is still unknown whether or not RIM patched this (afaik there is no statement from RIM regarding the patch if one was applied). In comparison, the exploit that the hackers used to hack the iPhone was fixed and able to be updated the day before the event. The patches and fixes are fast with iPhone in comparison to RIM, who then has to push it to the carriers and wait for them to approve and then push down, it takes months in comparison to minutes (the DL from iTunes) when a patch is released.

    According to the hackers that proved the hack of the BB Torch and stole all contacts, were able to install and remove programs, and steal all the information off of the media card, iPhone and Android both are many, many years ahead of BB in OS security.
    10-12-11 08:37 AM
  6. Blacklac's Avatar
    Absolutely.

    Pwn2Own day 2: iPhone, BlackBerry beaten; Chrome, Firefox no-shows

    QUOTE:
    RIM has arguably made its platform more approachable to hackers and researchers alike. Were it not for this obscurity, the lack of DEP, ASLR, and code signing would leave it easy to attack, with Iozzo describing it as "way behind the iPhone at the moment, from a security perspective."

    RIM has shipped a newer firmware since, but Pinckaers has confirmed that the flaw still exists.


    ^ It is still unknown whether or not RIM patched this (afaik there is no statement from RIM regarding the patch if one was applied). In comparison, the exploit that the hackers used to hack the iPhone was fixed and able to be updated the day before the event. The patches and fixes are fast with iPhone in comparison to RIM, who then has to push it to the carriers and wait for them to approve and then push down, it takes months in comparison to minutes (the DL from iTunes) when a patch is released.

    According to the hackers that proved the hack of the BB Torch and stole all contacts, were able to install and remove programs, and steal all the information off of the media card, iPhone and Android both are many, many years ahead of BB in OS security.
    KB26132-Vulnerabilities in WebKit browser engine impact BlackBerry 6

    Scroll down to "Resolution" where they claim they addressed this issue(s) shortly after. Also, it says: A successful attack could result in remote code execution (RCE) on a smartphone running BlackBerry 6 software. An attacker could exploit the vulnerabilities to access the built-in media storage on a smartphone running BlackBerry 6. WebKit has access to data stored in the built-in media section as well as the media card (if present), but not the application storage of the BlackBerry smartphone because WebKit runs in a user mode process (a restricted process). For example, the attacker could download the BlackBerry Messenger contact list (which is stored in built-in media, unlike other contact information on the BlackBerry smartphone) as well as photos stored in the file system of that smartphone. See the Additional Details section for more details on user mode processes and the file storage system.
    Last edited by Blacklac; 10-12-11 at 01:41 PM.
    f1rewire likes this.
    10-12-11 01:35 PM
  7. olga421's Avatar
    nah thats rubbish,that will not steer me away from blackberry no way.
    10-12-11 04:05 PM
  8. T
    The browser exploit doesn't work if javascript is turned off, as is mine most of the time.
    10-12-11 04:15 PM
  9. George__'s Avatar
    Iphones carry to much heat. Feel like if I bought anything Apple I... it'd get stolen if i didn't watch it 24/7
    10-12-11 06:33 PM
  10. avt123's Avatar
    Haven't had to worry about any trying to steal mine...
    10-12-11 06:45 PM
  11. OniBerry's Avatar
    As with anything, the weakest point from a security view, is, and always will be, the user.
    10-12-11 06:49 PM
  12. hornlovah's Avatar
    According to the hackers that proved the hack of the BB Torch and stole all contacts, were able to install and remove programs, and steal all the information off of the media card, iPhone and Android both are many, many years ahead of BB in OS security.
    That is your opinion or interpretation of the hackers remarks. An informed person would not make such a claim. If you look at overall security in terms of malware, browser exploits, and physical device security:

    Malware: Apple does a good job at policing the apps in their app store, but Android Market is plagued by malware. Of course, you can mitigate malware risks by choosing your apps carefully and monitoring the permissions they request.

    Browser Exploits: The Pwn2Own WebKit browser exploit is well documented, but Google Android browser exploits and do the same for iPhone. Kind of blows your mind, doesnt it? Thousands of iPhones have been rooted by simply visiting a website and responding to a couple of prompts. That is not a secure browser or OS.

    Root Access: Android is shipping some phones with a locked bootloader, but theyve managed root access on all iPhones to date. Want to bet how long it takes that hacking community to root an iPhone 4S? Theyve already jailbroken iOS5. The security implications of a superuser with access to the entire file system are well known. You can't root a BlackBerry.

    Password Protection: You will not find an example of someone bypassing the passcode on a BlackBerry, period. There have been several instances of someone bypassing Androids pattern lock through screen manipulation or through root access. Password protected iPhones can be exploited through their backups or passcodes can be extracted from the device itself. How is that secure?

    If your only security concern is malware, consider an iPhone. Most security/privacy minded consumers will want to consider all risks, however.
    10-12-11 10:07 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD