01-19-11 11:25 PM
53 123
tools
  1. Jaguarr40's Avatar
    Just wondering how the security stacks up on the Nokias? There's always something with better this or that. I am attracted to the entire bb package as a whole. Just an opinion.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    +1. 10 char
    01-19-11 05:56 PM
  2. luqman24's Avatar
    i'm honestly hoping that "512MB of ram" is just a rumor with the Torch 2 and the official word is 1GB of Ram with 4.3" LED display, 8PM back camera and 5MP front with both 1080p recording, 2gHZ dual core processors, dre beats speakers, and 5300mAh slim battery (hey they managed to stuff everything in those super thin LED TVs)...ok i'm back to reality, anything new and big happen for RIM while I was lost in that amazing dream??

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Last edited by luqman24; 01-19-11 at 10:30 PM.
    01-19-11 10:14 PM
  3. radimus's Avatar
    Looking over RIM's history I think they've done a pretty good job of ramping up the specs of their products. Especially when you consider how far those specs have come and the requirements that they have to meet.

    Does anyone remember the Blackberries that came before the 8700? Models like the 6210, 7280, or 7780? Ever check the specs on those? They had the nearly the same specs as the old Palm Pilots before the Palm Tungsten came out. Now, about 5 or 6 years after the release of the 8700, they plan to release devices with 1.2Ghz CPU's. All done in-house while still meeting the security and device control requirements of their core customers. To put that rate of advancement into perspective, high end Windows Mobile devices (the predecessor of the Android devices) got 624Mhz CPU's at around the same time RIM released the 8700.

    And the requirements of RIM's business and government customers are main reason why RIM devices will probably always be behind the tech level of the Androids and iOS's (or whatever the next bright and shiny is). RIM just can't go out to any Asian OEM, have them slap a bunch of bits together, and call it a Blackberry. Their devices have to be secure and controllable. Sure, you can tie an Android device to ActiveSync and push a policy to it, but when the end user can install an app on said Android device that let's him deactivate parts of the policy (like forced passwords or remote wipe) it kind of defeats the purpose.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    01-19-11 11:25 PM
53 123
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD