07-09-10 12:06 PM
81 123 ...
tools
  1. flchick75's Avatar
    Hey Everyone, I just got a charger for work and I'd like to use it but I'm afraid that you can charge your phone too much. I have heard so many different things and I know that todays batteries are much different than the batteries of yesterday.

    I had heard previously that you should charge your battery when its pretty much drained to keep it lasting longer. I usually just charge mine every night, thats what I've always done.

    Then I heard that these batteries can "learn" the first two weeks you get them (I have a new bold). I think that's a load of bologna though, they don't have memories.

    Ok so I need some educated people to help me out here.

    Thanks!
    07-07-10 09:18 AM
  2. Pi Guy 3.14's Avatar
    No, you can never overcharge your phone..... (not a fan of search eh?)
    07-07-10 09:35 AM
  3. flchick75's Avatar
    anyone else?
    07-07-10 09:53 AM
  4. Pi Guy 3.14's Avatar
    Anyone else what? Want them to tell you the same answer?
    07-07-10 10:02 AM
  5. pkcable's Avatar
    With older batteries this was much more of an issue, but with today's cell batteries it's not so much of an issue. Charge away!
    07-07-10 10:07 AM
  6. xs11e's Avatar
    anyone else?
    Yes, you CAN overcharge a cell phone battery but not with the charger that came with the phone or one that's made for the phone. Overcharging requires a charger that supplies a voltage that is too high.

    I destroyed a battery in a phone using the USB port on my PC, the battery was almost completely dead and apparently the PC USB port tried to charge the battery too fast, it swelled up like a balloon!

    I've found the USB port is safe if the battery is about 50% charged or more but it's always safer to use the proper charger.
    Last edited by xs11e; 07-07-10 at 10:18 AM.
    07-07-10 10:15 AM
  7. flchick75's Avatar
    Yes, you CAN overcharge a cell phone battery but not with the charger that came with the phone or one that's made for the phone. Overcharging requires a charger that supplies a voltage that is too high.

    I destroyed a battery in a phone using the USB port on my PC, the battery was almost completely dead and apparently the PC USB port tried to charge the battery too fast, it swelled up like a balloon!

    I've found the USB port is safe if the battery is about 50% charged or more but it's always safer to use the proper charger.
    Good point, I got a couple chargers from the kiosk in the mall (non name brand) and I was worried about the same thing. It's a micro USB though and I'm hoping they'll be ok. Not sure how you find out though.
    07-07-10 10:22 AM
  8. Pi Guy 3.14's Avatar
    You're welcome.
    07-07-10 10:24 AM
  9. xs11e's Avatar
    Good point, I got a couple chargers from the kiosk in the mall (non name brand) and I was worried about the same thing. It's a micro USB though and I'm hoping they'll be ok. Not sure how you find out though.
    They'll be safe, I'm sure. Read the tiny almost invisible print on the part that plugs into the wall, compare output voltage with the charger that came with the phone. For most BBs, that'll be around 5v.
    07-07-10 10:34 AM
  10. flchick75's Avatar
    They'll be safe, I'm sure. Read the tiny almost invisible print on the part that plugs into the wall, compare output voltage with the charger that came with the phone. For most BBs, that'll be around 5v.
    Ok will do, I appreciate your help
    07-07-10 10:35 AM
  11. flchick75's Avatar
    It says 4.5 to 12.5 Output on the new one but I have to go home to compare it to my BB one
    07-07-10 10:36 AM
  12. SevereDeceit's Avatar
    Anyone else what? Want them to tell you the same answer?
    You have entirely too much time on your hands, you could of easily just answered the question instead of making yourself look like a fool. Let me break it down for you since you seem to have a hard time understanding. There is over 2 million members here, not everyone will search, just the way it is. Now run along...
    07-07-10 10:42 AM
  13. Pi Guy 3.14's Avatar
    You have entirely too much time on your hands, you could of easily just answered the question instead of making yourself look like a fool. Let me break it down for you since you seem to have a hard time understanding. There is over 2 million members here, not everyone will search, just the way it is. Now run along...
    Thank you for pointing that out to me that I do have too much time on my hands, I'm at work... But uh, I DID answer the question...

    I really don't care if you think I looked like a fool...
    07-07-10 10:46 AM
  14. SevereDeceit's Avatar
    Thank you for pointing that out to me that I do have too much time on my hands, I'm at work... But uh, I DID answer the question...

    I really don't care if you think I looked like a fool...
    You can think what you like, all I know is you and I are gonna be best friends here, I cherish the though of it. Shame out of all the two million members here you had to run into me...
    07-07-10 10:50 AM
  15. albee 1's Avatar
    The only negative effect I have seen of Lithium Ion batteries is when they are constantly drained. I plug my bb in as frequently as I can. In the days of Nicad (nickle cadmium) they had a habit of losing their ability to accept a full charge if not depleted completely the first 3 or 4 chargings. Just don't drain it completely and you will be fine.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-07-10 10:51 AM
  16. Radius's Avatar
    Yes, you CAN overcharge a cell phone battery but not with the charger that came with the phone or one that's made for the phone. Overcharging requires a charger that supplies a voltage that is too high.

    I destroyed a battery in a phone using the USB port on my PC, the battery was almost completely dead and apparently the PC USB port tried to charge the battery too fast, it swelled up like a balloon!

    I've found the USB port is safe if the battery is about 50% charged or more but it's always safer to use the proper charger.
    You are so wrong it hurts.

    This had nothing to do with the USB port, there is no danger of overcharging the phone or "charging it too fast" either from the USB cable or the wall cable.

    What you experienced was a failure in the battery protection circuit and quite possibly the BB hardware too. A LIon battery will actually dissipate voltage over its threshold to keep within it's limits but if this fails or too much current is applied too quickly then you get the problem you experienced.

    So bottom line, no, you cannot overcharge the battery and USB or wall chargers WILL NOT damage the battery no matter how long they are plugged in for unless you have a hardware defect either in the phone or the battery itself.
    07-07-10 10:54 AM
  17. Pi Guy 3.14's Avatar
    You can think what you like, all I know is you and I are gonna be best friends here, I cherish the though of it. Shame out of all the two million members here you had to run into me...
    Sweet, looking forward to it.
    07-07-10 10:54 AM
  18. pkcable's Avatar
    Yes, you CAN overcharge a cell phone battery but not with the charger that came with the phone or one that's made for the phone. Overcharging requires a charger that supplies a voltage that is too high.

    I destroyed a battery in a phone using the USB port on my PC, the battery was almost completely dead and apparently the PC USB port tried to charge the battery too fast, it swelled up like a balloon!

    I've found the USB port is safe if the battery is about 50% charged or more but it's always safer to use the proper charger.
    EXCELLENT point!!!!! Never EVER use a non OEM plug in charger, as pointed out they don't have the correct voltage regulation circuitry. USB cords are ok because the computer controls it, plus it's a trickle charge, but for the plug in charger you NEED to use the RIM one!
    07-07-10 10:55 AM
  19. Radius's Avatar
    The only negative effect I have seen of Lithium Ion batteries is when they are constantly drained. I plug my bb in as frequently as I can. In the days of Nicad (nickle cadmium) they had a habit of losing their ability to accept a full charge if not depleted completely the first 3 or 4 chargings. Just don't drain it completely and you will be fine.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    My rule of thumb is never drain it less than 25%. If a LIon battery goes below 3V then damage occurs more rapidly than normal. These batteries have a finite shelf life and wilt like lettuce over time if you want to look at it that way.

    Charge it often and keep it high.

    HOWEVER...

    If you intend to store an unused LIon battery for more than a few days outside of a device then reduce the charge to 50% before storing it. A fully charged LIon battery will drain away to nothing very quickly whereas one with a 50% charge to start with will hold that for a long time.

    Make sense? I know not really, but there's a whole ugly reason behind that.
    07-07-10 10:56 AM
  20. Pi Guy 3.14's Avatar
    I used a Motorola charger for about 4 years with a few of my BB's... no problems.
    07-07-10 10:56 AM
  21. albee 1's Avatar
    Good info Radius, and I'm sure another charger would do the job Pi if you are lucky enough to find one with identical specs, but it's so painful to try and read the damn thing! Miniature font, black on black background. Ouch.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-07-10 11:31 AM
  22. Snarfler's Avatar
    I charge mine every night, more often if they need it. one with the original RIM charger, the other with one from a Motorola bluetooth since the RIM charger for that phone only lasted about three weeks
    07-07-10 12:07 PM
  23. Pete6's Avatar
    Specifically on a modern BlackBerry overcharging does not happen. The phone manages the battery state and will shut off charging when the battery is fully charged.

    You can test this for yourselves by switching the phone off via the red call hangup button and starting the charge process. You will see the LED flasing gree/yellow on/off about every 2 seconds during the charge process.

    When the battery is fully charged the LED will go on solid green indicating that the phone knows that its battery now has a full charge.

    A further check woudl be to feel the temperature of the back of the phone (where the battery lives) whist charging and note the warmth of enegy flowing. A half an hour after the gree LED goes on solid, the warmth will have gone.
    07-07-10 12:09 PM
  24. flchick75's Avatar
    ok so normally my phone has the lightening bold when charging and then when fully charged it goes off even if its still plugged in. So if it goes off with the new charger, it should be fine right?

    Thanks for all the interesting and informative info people!
    07-07-10 12:15 PM
81 123 ...
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD