08-30-10 10:41 AM
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  1. phonejunky's Avatar
    How to Confront a BlackBerry Addict - CBS MoneyWatch.com

    This article was a woman i believe having trouble watching iPhone and Blackberry Addicts. Good for reading when bored leave comments on how you would handle these situations.
    08-28-10 09:02 PM
  2. Username00089's Avatar
    Happens most of the time with my friends. One in particular. I don't hold back with
    them. I give them a good verbal lashing. Four letter words and everything.
    08-28-10 09:15 PM
  3. phonejunky's Avatar
    LMAO that's too funny

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-28-10 09:23 PM
  4. trjnberry's Avatar
    I am often guilty of using the phone at the table. What I like to do is involve my dinner companions in the reason to use the BlackBerry. So, I'll say something like, "Oh, let me look that up on Wikipedia..." or "I think I got email about that, let me check my email for it..."

    I try hard not to use my BB in place of conversation when at the dining table. I think where people feel offended, is that you are jumping on your Berry and ignoring them. I find that Wikipedia is a good cover for checking your Berry while keeping your dinner guests in the loop, because your "online research" is relevant to the conversation. I think when your Berry use is relevant to the social interaction with your guests, they are less likely to feel offended by your use of the BlackBerry.
    08-29-10 03:11 AM
  5. GlitchZero's Avatar
    I couldn't care less. I'd be really pissed if I got a text or email about an accident with a family member / friend and my phone was off so I didn't look rude. Kind of the reason I CARRY a cellphone.

    I also don't get offended if someone does the same thing.

    Really good example; my buddy is big on the etiquette, and we were talking. his phone was off while we were hanging out; mine was on. I get a call from his girlfriend who was in an unsafe situation and needed help, and couldn't get a hold of him. Had my phone been off too, I don't want to think of what could've happened. I told him from then on to pick up his phone when it goes off, regardless of how rude it may seem. Some things - scratch that- a LOT of things are more important than other people's opinions of how rude you might seem.

    However, if some jackass is playing Paper Toss or Sheep Launcher while we're talking, that's different.

    So I guess I find calls / emails / texts ok. Apps not so much.
    08-29-10 09:44 AM
  6. T
    I guess I favor a balance. I have friends who always answer their phones, and it doesn't bother me. Sometimes I eavesdrop with interest, and sometimes I'm bored by it. What perplexes me more is why they would want me knowing what they're talking about or why they would even want me to speculate with whom they're communicating. I'm an intensely private person, and I would rather not have associates even know that I might be communicating with someone with the help of my device; many of them would be nosey enough to ask, "Who's that you're chatting with?" Therefore, I take advantage of the less audible notification profiles all the time. And usually I'll let calls go to voice mail and then sneak out to check and return them unless I'm alone or only among strangers. But I'm a flexible person, and I don't mind when others take calls. I guess it bothers me more if I'm talking to people and their kids keep interrupting.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-29-10 11:23 AM
  7. BoldtotheMax's Avatar
    Kelly, why do you even have a phone? And I assume it is a smartphone no?

    Me, when I am with family and friends, I take my phone with me, it don't leave my side, however is almost always on silence/vibrate and I will check it from time to time...just to see if it is something important, but only when nobody else is talking and what not. That is rude to pull it out if they are in the middle of a convo....

    I pay a healthy bill for my family plan, we all use them quite a bit, better believe I am going to be using it as much as I can or want. If not, why would I have gotten a smartphone that requires a data plan? Pretty silly no? I refuse to waste my money....

    So kelly, if that is the case with you and seems you hardly use your phone, why not save some cheddar and get a dumbphone? If you already have one, then understandable, lol!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-29-10 12:52 PM
  8. little_monster's Avatar
    I really don't mind. The thing with my friends is that I'm the only one with a bb so their always getting txt from twitter. So for us its always common to be on our phones whenever we hang out

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-29-10 01:06 PM
  9. itsdollar's Avatar
    Funny but true article. I used to be that guy (not with my kids though) but now I have 2 friends that do it trying to get me to switch to a Android based phone. Holidays, sporting events, and any other events we are at they are always showing me a new app. The wives are the frustrated ones in my circle. Not my wife though as she is always checking her BB.
    08-29-10 01:19 PM
  10. exelant's Avatar
    Like anything we do in social and work settings, one one tailors one's behavior to the situation. When out with friends or a significant other, the device goes to vibrate and is not on the table. One can discretly monitor messages and calls. If I'm by myself around other people, I could give a rip what anyone thinks.

    Those who use their devices in a way that others in their group find inappropriate will find their friends don't invite them as often. They'll be dealt with the way bores have always been dealt with: by being ignored.
    08-29-10 02:06 PM
  11. Tiassa's Avatar
    I set my phone with different ringtones so I don't have to look at it when it goes off to know what is happening. And there is a procedure for each

    Primary (BES)-mail, I don't check it unless I'm expecting something important
    BIS account, -- pretty much ignore it, unless I've given it to someone and I'm expecting a message from them
    The wife's phone (and blackberry, she carries 2 devices due to her job), Always pick up
    Immediate family members, Check to see who it is then pick up if I'm in a place where I feel it is OK to do so.
    People who are in my contact list Pretty much same as above but I might not even check it and just let it go to VM
    SMS Messages Ignore unless I'm expecting something
    BBM I have Very few BBM contacts so I'm likely to check this as well.
    08-29-10 02:08 PM
  12. avt123's Avatar
    I couldn't care less. I'd be really pissed if I got a text or email about an accident with a family member / friend and my phone was off so I didn't look rude. Kind of the reason I CARRY a cellphone.

    I also don't get offended if someone does the same thing.

    Really good example; my buddy is big on the etiquette, and we were talking. his phone was off while we were hanging out; mine was on. I get a call from his girlfriend who was in an unsafe situation and needed help, and couldn't get a hold of him. Had my phone been off too, I don't want to think of what could've happened. I told him from then on to pick up his phone when it goes off, regardless of how rude it may seem. Some things - scratch that- a LOT of things are more important than other people's opinions of how rude you might seem.

    However, if some jackass is playing Paper Toss or Sheep Launcher while we're talking, that's different.

    So I guess I find calls / emails / texts ok. Apps not so much.
    Exactly. I don't mind when people text/email or answer the phone if they need to. It is part of life now. People are always connected, and someone might need you right away and you would never know if you didn't answer their message/call. Playing games is a different story. That is just rude.
    08-29-10 02:12 PM
  13. crbowers's Avatar
    First of all, in my opinion, one of the most rude things a person can do it correct a stranger on a manners issue.

    The way I look at it, manners are a subjective issue and what is acceptable changes between different groups of people.

    In my group of regular friends, no one has a problem with BB's or iPhones at the dinner table. When we go out to eat, everyone at the table has their phone out and conversation flows, when people aren't talking they're pounding out something on the phone. Nobody in the group is offended.

    If someone at another table is offended by our activity, I don't really care. It's none of their business. If us using our phones at our table is seriously impairing your ability to enjoy your meal, you've got issues.

    The same holds true for my immediate family, though I know that some in my extended family don't like it, and when I'm at their table, I abide by their wishes.

    If you don't like guests at your table using their phones, by all means, speak up and let them know. It is your table, and if they don't want to respect your wishes they don't belong there.

    And I'm not sure I'd go to a restaurant with a no devices policy, it would have to be a very special situation.
    08-29-10 02:19 PM
  14. T
    ... a restaurant with a no devices policy ...
    I always thought that was pretty silly if not outright hypocritical. I mean, in those restaurants, their phones still ring, and someone still answers the phones. So I guess it's okay if the establishment does business, just none of the customers can, lol.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-29-10 02:28 PM
  15. avt123's Avatar
    First of all, in my opinion, one of the most rude things a person can do it correct a stranger on a manners issue.

    The way I look at it, manners are a subjective issue and what is acceptable changes between different groups of people.

    In my group of regular friends, no one has a problem with BB's or iPhones at the dinner table. When we go out to eat, everyone at the table has their phone out and conversation flows, when people aren't talking they're pounding out something on the phone. Nobody in the group is offended.

    If someone at another table is offended by our activity, I don't really care. It's none of their business. If us using our phones at our table is seriously impairing your ability to enjoy your meal, you've got issues.

    The same holds true for my immediate family, though I know that some in my extended family don't like it, and when I'm at their table, I abide by their wishes.

    If you don't like guests at your table using their phones, by all means, speak up and let them know. It is your table, and if they don't want to respect your wishes they don't belong there.

    And I'm not sure I'd go to a restaurant with a no devices policy, it would have to be a very special situation.
    Very true. I don't see how using my device (unless I'm on a voice call) would offend someone at a different table. And strangers have no place correcting people's manners. That is extremely rude also.
    08-29-10 02:32 PM
  16. Spiral_ouT's Avatar
    I would consider it a phone addiction or a addiction to staying connected, rather than a Blackberry or iPhone addiction. I have seen equally as many people texting away on their dumbphones as I have smartphones. Kids especially.
    08-29-10 02:40 PM
  17. xSKYK1Dx's Avatar
    "I’d rather see people talk with their mouths full. At least then they’re engaged in the conversation"

    Sounds like sombody is just desperate for attention because that's just downright nasty.

    Like many other issues (women wearing jeans, young people swearing, interracial marriage, peeing in the shower, the rising cost of living, etc) this will become the norm and no one will think anything of it.
    08-29-10 06:13 PM
  18. avt123's Avatar
    "Id rather see people talk with their mouths full. At least then theyre engaged in the conversation"

    Sounds like sombody is just desperate for attention because that's just downright nasty.

    Like many other issues (women wearing jeans, young people swearing, interracial marriage, peeing in the shower, the rising cost of living, etc) this will become the norm and no one will think anything of it.
    Lol what?

    ...
    08-29-10 06:17 PM
  19. paddygirl16's Avatar
    People are forgetting to look each other in the eye and converse. I think it is down right rude to be on any device that pulls your eyes away from anyone having a conversation (wife, husband, significant other, waitress, and even a stranger asking for directions). Of course, most of us on here are semi-guilty of this I am sure. I have several people in my circle that do it, and after voicing my frustrations to no avail, I decided if u can't beat them join them. I think we will all have better relationships with all around us if we put the damn thing down and looked around. Me included

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-29-10 06:37 PM
  20. Username00089's Avatar
    "I’d rather see people talk with their mouths full. At least then they’re engaged in the conversation"

    Sounds like sombody is just desperate for attention because that's just downright nasty.

    Like many other issues (women wearing jeans, young people swearing, peeing in the shower, the rising cost of living, etc) this will become the norm and no one will think anything of it.
    AG, is that you?
    08-29-10 06:41 PM
  21. chuckh0308's Avatar
    I think there's a fine line between what is acceptable and what is not. I mean, if I'm having dinner with you and you're ignoring me while pounding away on Twitter or some other stupid thing then I'm going to be pretty annoyed, to say the least. But if your phone rings and it's an important call then I understand. Or if the conversation leads to doing a google search or something then that's OK too, as long as it is relevant to the conversation. It also depends on what type of dinner or such that it is. If you're having lunch with someone during business hours and their business revolves around them answering the phone, well then it's something you need to deal with.

    I'll give a little example. A couple nights ago we went out to dinner with some friends and their two kids. It was a casual thing so I took my phone with me, but kept it in my pocket. Normally it would stay there, but I had a friend who called (and I didn't answer) and then sent a txt. He was in a bind and trying to find a car part in a hurry (he was getting ready to leave on a road trip) that he knew I might have. So I apologized to my friends and responded via txt so that my other friend would have an answer quicker and know how he needed to proceed. Normally I would make people wait, but in this instance I felt it was acceptable given the circumstances. And I think acknowledging to my friends at dinner that I knew I was taking attention away from them for a few moments went a long way in them being OK with it.

    But again, if I'm sitting at a table trying to have a conversation with you and your Twitter or FB can't wait then there may be some tension!
    08-29-10 07:56 PM
  22. trjnberry's Avatar
    That's the point I've been stating. You don't bring a book to read to yourself during a conference with your employees or boss. Emergencies are a completely different situation. Manners are the diplomacy needed for the situation.
    Kelly, how do you know that somebody is having an emergency and trying to get a hold of you when your phone is in the car? Isn't that why we have profiles on these things? If somebody is tying to reach you, they'll try different means like texting or re-calling every few minutes or so. If you got your phone on vibrate, in your pocket or on your hip, you can determine by the number of alerts you get if you need to take the call. Then, you politely excuse yourself from the table and go check your phone. If it's in the car, you'll never know you were being called until you get to the car. By then, it could be too late.
    08-29-10 09:01 PM
  23. joemecu's Avatar
    I work with a whole team of them unfortunately. None of them shut their alerts off during meetings, and it drives me insane. I find it utterly distracting to have beeps, and other alerts going off during meetings. I dislike meetings to begin with, and them lasting longer than they have to doesn't help.

    My biggest peeve is someone who will answer their phone in a meeting. Nothing can be that important, that it can't wait 10 minutes, as far as I'm concerned. People got along fine without cell phones, years ago. Sure, it took longer to get a hold of someone, but nowadays, it's too easy to get a hold of people. I voice my displeasure of noises during meetings, but it gets me nowhere. It's bad enough hearing them all day, but if I'm at my desk, I can at least put headphones on. I can concentrate better with music, instead of people chatting, or their devices making noise all day.

    People having phones audibly ringing/alerting in restaurants is rude to me. Even worse is the person who talks on the cell phone with no regard to those around them. I'll use mine at the grocery store every so often to check with my wife on a question about an item, but I'm not going to walk around chatting on it, about nonsense.
    Last edited by joemecu; 08-29-10 at 09:10 PM.
    08-29-10 09:04 PM
  24. paddygirl16's Avatar
    Kelly, how do you know that somebody is having an emergency and trying to get a hold of you when your phone is in the car? Isn't that why we have profiles on these things? If somebody is tying to reach you, they'll try different means like texting or re-calling every few minutes or so. If you got your phone on vibrate, in your pocket or on your hip, you can determine by the number of alerts you get if you need to take the call. Then, you politely excuse yourself from the table and go check your phone. If it's in the car, you'll never know you were being called until you get to the car. By then, it could be too late.
    Mmmmmmmm. I wonder what they did prior to cell phones/smart phones?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-29-10 09:08 PM
  25. SCrid2000's Avatar
    Lol, using your phone at the table is rude, duh. But who the heck can say "Do you ever run into situations where people get frustrated when you use it at the table?" without coming off as a complete jack-a?
    Maybe I just hate it when people pretend to be polite while trying to be rude.
    08-29-10 10:28 PM
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