1. louzer's Avatar
    It's April. BB7 phones are taking a huge hit in the US. Sprint is down to the Bold 9930 and the Curve 9350. The Torch 9850 is EOL. AT&T can't give their 'flagship' Torch 9810 away. Verizon is selling nothing but Droids and iPhones.

    BB10 isn't due out until 'the end of the year'. BB7 phone sales were supposed to carry RIM over until BB10 launches. They'll still be able to sell Curves and Bolds (9790) in emerging markets, but Android is figuring a way even into that market.

    I love my 9650 but was comparing the 9930 and the 9850. I need a keyboard and a good camera. The 9930 provides the keyboard and the 9850 has a much superior camera. I finally decided that for the short haul, camera trumped keyboard since a) I've been getting pretty good at a touch keyboard with my Playbook, and b) I doubt that a new BB10 slider would get to Sprint and that I'd have a choice of only 1 BB10 phone (touch only since the slider will probably be going to AT&T). But now the phone that I chose to try has been EOL'd. My 9650 is sluggish, but functional enough to at least get me by until the end of this year.

    My point is as follows.

    Given that:
    • Everyone knows that RIM is planning a BB10 launch for the end of the year.
    • RIM is relying on BB7 sales to carry them over.
    • Someone like me whose blood runs blackberry can't even justify a BB7 phone to replace my current Blackberry for the short term.
    • People who don't frequent forums like this are going Android and iPhone.
    • Development and operations in coordinating and managing the creation of a brand new OS is extremely expensive.


    Will RIM be able to financially sustain any sort of delay past the end of this year, or even worse, a failure of BB10 to catch on? Is a late fall launch of BB10 RIM's hail mary pass with no time left on the clock?

    I just watched the WPCentral video review of the Nokia Lumia 900. I'm loving what Nokia has done with the hardware. WP7 runs smooth, is fluid, and the Amoled screen looks amazing. WP7 is certainly a different approach than Android and iOS. Microsoft has done an awesome job designing the UI in terms of color, text, and layout. It's a very appealing package.

    There are two problems about the Lumia for me, though. The first probem is that I'm on Sprint. The Lumia 900 is an AT&T exclusive and Sprint probably won't see if for at least 6 months. My second problem is that I was watching the video on my Playbook. As I was watching the video, all I was thinking was that I hope that RIM can get Nokia-like (or better) hardware design to house a similar experience that I get using my Playbook on a phone. I realized that I really like the Lumia 900, but what I really want is a BB10 phone. I really hope the hail mary pass is caught.

    BB10 has to completely rock coming out of the gate. There can't be bugs. It can't lagck any features. The ecosystem needs to be solid. And then, if they achieve this, the last step is to make sure that people both notice and adopt it. This is a pretty tall order for RIM. Come on, Thorsten. This is your chance. Miss the pass and you'll probably end up at another company as a high-ranking operations position. But if you catch this one, you can become legendary.
    04-04-12 01:36 AM
  2. phoreoneone's Avatar


    I agree! RIM has to come out sprinting and swinging without stumbling.
    04-04-12 03:59 AM
  3. xandermac's Avatar
    Click to view quoted image


    I agree! RIM has to come out sprinting and swinging without stumbling.
    Has that ever happened? I think BB10 will be adopted about as well as BB7. RIM need developers on board to make it a runaway success so I hope they spend their time between now and 2013 working on that. Based on their statement of "focusing on enterprise" I doubt that'll happen. RIM seem to have decided that they're happy being a niche player.
    04-04-12 08:02 AM
  4. lnichols's Avatar
    RIM need developers on board to make it a runaway success so I hope they spend their time between now and 2013 working on that. Based on their statement of "focusing on enterprise" I doubt that'll happen. RIM seem to have decided that they're happy being a niche player.
    You're taking that statement out of context, just like the media did. In the call, that statement was made when they were discussing the BYOD phenomena and corporate issues managing those devices, and how consumers weren't choosing Blackberry's for their personal devices in the US. So the focusing on the enterprise includes focusing on the consumer because of BYOD. They know that if consumers don't want to buy a BB10 device, then it won't be part of BYOD, which means it will continue to shrink from a corporate standpoint, and sales in the US will continue to slide. The reporting done on what was said on the call was atrocious, and basically what I expect from the lazy media.

    As for the OP, yes BB10 is make or break for RIM. It has to be a great product, has to have the major apps people expect, and it has to be marketed well. WP7 has shown that a good new platform can go nowhere fast as it has been a sales flop. Nokia and Microsoft are going to try to change this with price (Lumia 900 for $100 on contract). The funny thing is that the Lumia 900 is actually running an almost identical processor as the Bold 9900 (Single core Snapdragon with Adreno 205 GPU, clocked 200 MHz higher), but I have yet to read it being bashed for outdated specs.

    I don't know how RIM can convince consumers to give them a chance over iPhone, and the plethora of Android devices. Android has pricing covered from low end to high end, and if people come in and see a $200 on contract iPhone, and $200 on contract BB10 device, what will make them choose the BB10 device? We know the carriers aren't going to help. They need to get the CMO position filled ASAP with a great person because everything is riding on BB10's consumer acceptance IMHO.
    04-04-12 09:42 AM
  5. xandermac's Avatar
    I don't believe that I am taking it out of context. The media reported that they were giving up on the consumer market when rim clearly stated that they will focus on their strengths (enterprise). When a developer hears that they will naturally rule the blackberry out as a strong consumer platform. Had rim said they will focus purely on the consumer it might be a different story and may have left some incentive for app developers to take a good look at QNX in the future. I don't believe anyone is misconstruing anything, perception is reality.

    You're taking that statement out of context, just like the media did. In the call, that statement was made when they were discussing the BYOD phenomena and corporate issues managing those devices, and how consumers weren't choosing Blackberry's for their personal devices in the US. So the focusing on the enterprise includes focusing on the consumer because of BYOD. They know that if consumers don't want to buy a BB10 device, then it won't be part of BYOD, which means it will continue to shrink from a corporate standpoint, and sales in the US will continue to slide. The reporting done on what was said on the call was atrocious, and basically what I expect from the lazy media.

    As for the OP, yes BB10 is make or break for RIM. It has to be a great product, has to have the major apps people expect, and it has to be marketed well. WP7 has shown that a good new platform can go nowhere fast as it has been a sales flop. Nokia and Microsoft are going to try to change this with price (Lumia 900 for $100 on contract). The funny thing is that the Lumia 900 is actually running an almost identical processor as the Bold 9900 (Single core Snapdragon with Adreno 205 GPU, clocked 200 MHz higher), but I have yet to read it being bashed for outdated specs.

    I don't know how RIM can convince consumers to give them a chance over iPhone, and the plethora of Android devices. Android has pricing covered from low end to high end, and if people come in and see a $200 on contract iPhone, and $200 on contract BB10 device, what will make them choose the BB10 device? We know the carriers aren't going to help. They need to get the CMO position filled ASAP with a great person because everything is riding on BB10's consumer acceptance IMHO.
    04-04-12 09:55 AM
  6. Chrisy's Avatar
    Has that ever happened? I think BB10 will be adopted about as well as BB7. RIM need developers on board to make it a runaway success so I hope they spend their time between now and 2013 working on that. Based on their statement of "focusing on enterprise" I doubt that'll happen. RIM seem to have decided that they're happy being a niche player.
    Yes it has, with the early BlackBerry devices. Also, when have we ever seen such changes in RIM like what is going on now with new management and a large number of personal changes.

    I agree that RIM's recent past would most likely predict their future, but this isn't always so. When changes are made, new results come about.

    I just hope they're for the better. I think, personally, they will be.
    04-04-12 10:12 AM
  7. lnichols's Avatar
    I don't believe that I am taking it out of context. The media reported that they were giving up on the consumer market when rim clearly stated that they will focus on their strengths (enterprise). When a developer hears that they will naturally rule the blackberry out as a strong consumer platform. Had rim said they will focus purely on the consumer it might be a different story and may have left some incentive for app developers to take a good look at QNX in the future. I don't believe anyone is misconstruing anything, perception is reality.
    Did you actually listen to the conference call, or just read the media's misinterpretation of the call?

    Thorsten said:

    We plan to refocus on the enterprise business and capitalize on our leading position in this segment. We were delayed to the bring-your-own-device movement and we saw a significant slowing down in our enterprise subscriber growth rate as a result. I am committed with my team to reclaiming lost market share in this space.
    Later in the call:

    I know I've provided a lot of information for you to digest this afternoon, but the simple messages I want you to understand and take home is that we're making the necessary changes at the company, and that we're focused on: first, realigning the business to build on our strength including the Enterprise, driving BlackBerry 7 upgrades, onboarding new customers around the world to the BlackBerry platform and redefining our services model; second, an on-time and successful launch of our first BlackBerry 10 smartphone, which are on track for the latter part of calendar year 2012; third, aggressively reshaping the organization for increased accountability and efficiency; fourth, and evaluating a wide variety of options to drive stakeholder value.
    04-04-12 03:12 PM
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