09-24-09 11:49 AM
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  1. OskahOfDisastah's Avatar
    Okay so i was reading an article that stated that cdma phones are worse than gsm phones, whats the difference? and why is it better??
    09-22-09 09:13 PM
  2. FYDave's Avatar
    You're asking for a comparison of the two networks?

    1. Code division multiple access - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    2. GSM - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The first one is CDMA and the second is GSM.
    09-22-09 11:17 PM
  3. ComfortablyNumb's Avatar
    Those links sum it up pretty well.
    09-22-09 11:19 PM
  4. luvitlo's Avatar
    My CDMA gets way better signal than any of my friends GSM. But I do like the fact that with GSM you can swap Sim cards between phones, where I have to take mine in to get programmed.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-22-09 11:55 PM
  5. smnc's Avatar
    Interestingly, the current (3rd Generation) GSM technology, UMTS, uses a CDMA-based interface called W-CDMA.

    CDMA allows a lot more data to be crammed into the same radio spectrum than the original TDMA base that GSM was built on.
    Until something better comes along, we'll all be using CDMA in one way or another, but straight CDMA/Ev-DO is a dead end. The sooner Sprint realizes it, the better everyone will be.
    Here in Canada even our main CDMA supporters (the combined Bell/Telus network) is launching a nationwide GSM/UTMS network in the very near future.
    09-22-09 11:55 PM
  6. BewitchedWitch21's Avatar
    CDMA, for the win.
    09-22-09 11:59 PM
  7. smnc's Avatar
    My CDMA gets way better signal than any of my friends GSM. But I do like the fact that with GSM you can swap Sim cards between phones, where I have to take mine in to get programmed.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    That has nothing to do with the technology, and everything to do with the individual phones being used as well as signal coverage in your location. Not to mention that EVERY 3G GSM phone is using a CDMA interface.

    Where I live I can't get more than 2 bars on any CDMA phone (even outside), but all 4 of my GSM based phone sit at 4-5 bars even in my basement.
    09-23-09 12:00 AM
  8. TaZ52083's Avatar
    I guess the only advantage gsm have over cdma is the sim card. I also heard gsm don't get any good signal like cdma does.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 12:07 AM
  9. smnc's Avatar
    I guess the only advantage gsm have over cdma is the sim card.
    Actually, the SIM card is the least of GSM's advantages.
    1)Speed - 3G GSM (HSDPA/UMTS) is MUCH faster than 3G CDMA (Ev-DO)
    2)Room to grow - UMTS is being developed into a 4G technology. CDMA has weak prospects for 4G at best
    3)INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS - C'mon, it's in the name: GSM - Global Standard for Mobile communications. CDMA phones are useless outside of North America and parts of Asia. GSM phones will work ANYWHERE. Pretty much all GSM phones are Tri or Quad band, meaning they'll work EVERYWHERE.
    4)Universal emergency number - It's nice to know that you can call 112 ANYWHERE in the world on your GSM phone and get help.
    5)Built in security - Nothing wireless is ever completely secure, but GSM calls are moderately encrypted.

    Also, since 3G GSM uses CDMA technology, any advantages that CDMA brings to the table are also available to GSM.
    09-23-09 12:20 AM
  10. Radius's Avatar
    GSM is the way to go if you do any kind of traveling. I can't imagine needing to buy a CDMA phone every time I hit a different country or potentially the contracts that go along with it. CDMA is just inferior in that respect.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 01:21 AM
  11. Nucleartx's Avatar
    Basically, if you live in the US, CDMA provides better coverage in most rural locales. The adage is, CDMA is a mile wide and an inch thick and GSM is a inch wide and a mile thick. CDMA can cover larger area's more efficiently than GSM. GSM can bring more features but doesn't cover large area's very effectively.

    In 5 years, everybody will be LTE(even Clear) so it won't matter. Its not CDMA and not GSM as it is all IP protocol(the former 2 are switch based), just GSM/UMTS is slapping their label on it.
    09-23-09 05:47 AM
  12. smnc's Avatar
    GSM is the way to go if you do any kind of traveling. I can't imagine needing to buy a CDMA phone every time I hit a different country or potentially the contracts that go along with it. CDMA is just inferior in that respect.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    That actually wouldn't work, as outside on North America, most countries don't have CDMA networks, so you NEED to use GSM for world roaming.
    09-23-09 09:27 PM
  13. 360Challenge's Avatar
    I believe that LTE will no longer use W-CDMA architecture. E-UTRA (Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access) is a new air interface designed to support LTE's capabilities of supporting voice, high-speed interactive applications (including large data transfer) and feature-rich IPTV with full mobility. UMTS is not capable of providing the bandwith to support these services.

    E-UTRA will provide a single evolution path for both UMTS and EV-DO, therefore allowing for more consumer functionality.
    09-23-09 09:43 PM
  14. CRT's Avatar
    Why do GSM phones always cause interference with a nearby radio or tv? I can always tell when my girlfriend's phone is about to ring because its causes a weird sound to come through any nearby electronics. I noticed this about my ATT phone before I moved to VZW.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 09:50 PM
  15. smnc's Avatar
    In 5 years, everybody will be LTE(even Clear) so it won't matter. Its not CDMA and not GSM as it is all IP protocol(the former 2 are switch based), just GSM/UMTS is slapping their label on it.
    I doubt all networks will be fully converted to LTE in 5 years. How long have the major carriers been upgrading to UMTS/HSDPA for?
    But yes, LTE networks are starting to roll out any time now.
    And GSM has never been anything but a label for a series of features regardless of the underlying technology.
    Originally GSM was built off a TDMA base. Then it moved up to W-CDMA with UTMS/3G. Now 3GPP LTE will use E-UTRA. Although it is a new interface (and not backwards compatible), E-UTRA is based on some of the same technologies as W-CDMA/UTMS.
    09-23-09 09:55 PM
  16. smnc's Avatar
    Why do GSM phones always cause interference with a nearby radio or tv? I can always tell when my girlfriend's phone is about to ring because its causes a weird sound to come through any nearby electronics. I noticed this about my ATT phone before I moved to VZW.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    That's one of the JOYs of GSM. Basically it has to do with the powerful radios on GSM devices causing speakers/radios/tvs whatever to act as a receiver. The noise you hear is the bursts of the TDMA signal as it connects
    Some phones are worse than others.
    My Curve is particularly bad, but my old iDEN (Nextel's network-similar technology to GSM) i530 would set of speakers 10 feet away, easily! lol...
    09-23-09 10:52 PM
  17. Coruptyed's Avatar
    Why do GSM phones always cause interference with a nearby radio or tv? I can always tell when my girlfriend's phone is about to ring because its causes a weird sound to come through any nearby electronics. I noticed this about my ATT phone before I moved to VZW.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    thats one reason i stay clear of gsm, i hate that when the phones ring and the tv sketches out, ive always had cdma no problems and really like were the upgrades for it are going
    09-23-09 10:57 PM
  18. smnc's Avatar
    My Curve usually only needs a foot or two of space from speakers to get rid of interference.

    I used CDMA longer than I've had GSM, but for me it came down to 3 things, 2 of which relate to the carriers here.

    1) Crap CDMA coverage where I live. Probably because my GSM tower is less than 1KM away (1000 yards), whereas my nearest CDMA tower is several miles away over hilly terrain.

    2) Phones selection on CDMA is crap. Partially due to it being less popular world wide, and partly due my crappy CDMA carriers in Canada

    3) I travel outside North America with some frequency. With GSM, for short trips I just go. For longer trips I just swap out my SIM card for a local one when I arrive in europe, and go. Keeping all my contacts, apps, other personal information and preferences with me.
    09-23-09 11:09 PM
  19. ace587's Avatar
    depends which work. i have both AT&T and Sprint
    09-23-09 11:31 PM
  20. o0stryxs0o's Avatar
    thats one reason i stay clear of gsm, i hate that when the phones ring and the tv sketches out, ive always had cdma no problems and really like were the upgrades for it are going
    That only happens when your phone is around cheap electronic devices that have poor shielding. That's why in the early 2000 it would happen all the time but as of late you notice it doesn't happen as frequently around certain devices. Also one of the major perks and reasons I won't switch to CDMA is the sim card! I can break a phone and buy another off craigslist in the same day and they work no issues. With CDMA I have to make sure ESN numbers are clean and get it programmed and talk to CC or whoever, way to complicated!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-24-09 03:05 AM
  21. luvitlo's Avatar
    I seriously wonder is some of you know about this or just using big acronyms to sound smart. I know places in Arkansas that no cell phone and I mean none, Cingular, AllTel, Verizon, T-Mobile, cricket, or cell south have any signal what so ever. Our phones just kill the battery as they steady search for service. This is a whole community not a small area it like a 7 to 10 mile radius, and I have family that lives in the heart of this area. They all have cell phones for work, but they don't work until they get out of that area and closer to one of the cities now why is this, can't they erect a tower in that area to give all those people cell coverage?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-24-09 03:29 AM
  22. cavingjan's Avatar
    They could. Towers are expensive and it may or may not be worth the expense.
    09-24-09 07:18 AM
  23. ace587's Avatar
    I seriously wonder is some of you know about this or just using big acronyms to sound smart. I know places in Arkansas that no cell phone and I mean none, Cingular, AllTel, Verizon, T-Mobile, cricket, or cell south have any signal what so ever. Our phones just kill the battery as they steady search for service. This is a whole community not a small area it like a 7 to 10 mile radius, and I have family that lives in the heart of this area. They all have cell phones for work, but they don't work until they get out of that area and closer to one of the cities now why is this, can't they erect a tower in that area to give all those people cell coverage?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    zoning laws, or maybe NIMBY people
    09-24-09 10:26 AM
  24. smnc's Avatar
    They could. Towers are expensive and it may or may not be worth the expense.
    Exactly. But there could also be legal issues.
    I have a cottage in a really nice area here in Ontario, but the local municipal government REFUSES to allow cell phone towers to be erected within the township limits.
    The cell phone companies have erected towers AROUND the township, but my cottage is still about half a mile out of GSM range, although you can usually get a weak CDMA signal. How's that for a kick in the pants.
    09-24-09 10:32 AM
  25. cavingjan's Avatar
    Can you get service on the roof? With a directional antennae? If so, you could install a home repeater for it.

    Had the same problem at my cabin.
    09-24-09 11:44 AM
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